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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2007
If you take low-dose aspirin for your heart, can you also take ibuprofen for pain? You can, but the timing is critical. If you take ibuprofen first, it fills up the same molecular site inside platelets that aspirin binds to. If ibuprofen is already there, the aspirin can't bind, which means aspirin's potent anti-clotting action can't get started. To get around this, you can take low-dose aspirin, typically 81 milligrams, in the morning, then wait an hour or two before taking ibuprofen for pain.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | April 24, 2008
My 81-year-old mom is currently prescribed allopurinol to prevent gout, enalapril and labetalol for high blood pressure, metformin for diabetes, Plavix to thin her blood, Zocor to control cholesterol, plus extra magnesium and potassium (Klor-Con). She exhibits confusion, symptoms of dementia and dizziness, and has fallen several times. I think these medications may be excessive, and at this stage, some may even be counterproductive. Opinion? Your mother's medicines could be having an impact on her overall health.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | May 29, 2005
I know that aspirin reduces the risk of heart attacks, strokes and cancer, but I am confused about the best dose. Some experts recommend a baby aspirin, while others suggest a regular aspirin daily. I am prone to stomach irritation from chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. How can I get the benefits of aspirin and minimize the risks? Is buffered aspirin better? Even low-dose aspirin (81 mg) can cause digestive-tract irritation for some people. That's why no one should undertake a lifelong aspirin program without medical supervision.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | March 27, 2008
About a month ago, my son-in-law started taking one regular Bayer aspirin each morning and one Bayer PM before going to sleep. Two weeks into this regimen, he started bleeding from the mouth while he was sleeping. He stopped taking the aspirin, and the bleeding stopped as well. Is this a possible side effect? Aspirin can thin the blood by interfering with the sticky part of blood called platelets. Some people are especially susceptible to this effect, so even a standard dose might trigger bleeding.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon & Teresa Graedon KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 6, 2005
I've heard that a daily dose of aspirin might lead to an ulcer due to the corrosive effect of aspirin on the lining of the stomach. Enteric-coated aspirin is sometimes recommended. I understand that it results in the aspirin dissolving in the intestine rather than the stomach. Why is it better to get a hole in your intestine thanyour stomach? Holes in any part of the digestive tract are undesirable! Dr. Waqar Qureshi, chief of endoscopy at Baylor College of Medicine, says that doctors mostly ignored the effect of medications on the small intestine until recently because it was so hard to examine.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 25, 2000
Q. I'm taking aspirin for my heart and ginkgo to help boost my memory. My wife says you have written that this combination is risky. Can you tell me more, so I can decide whether to continue? A. We worry that ginkgo and aspirin could interact to increase the risk of bleeding. Although there have been several cases of hemorrhage with this combination, there has not been a study to determine the significance of this possible complication. In their column, Joe and Teresa Graedon answer letters from readers.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | April 19, 1994
You might think that a drug that has been around for nearly 100 years would hold no surprises. But new discoveries about aspirin never fail to amaze us.Although many people have turned to other drugs like Tylenol or Advil for pain relief, recently published research suggests that aspirin -- the cheapest drug in the pharmacy -- may help to prevent some of the most common cancers. In addition, tantalizing preliminary reports hint that aspirin or similar anti-inflammatory agents such as Indocin could help delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease.
FEATURES
By Ron Kotulakand Jon Van and Ron Kotulakand Jon Van,Chicago Tribune | December 18, 1990
The old advice to "take two aspirin, go to bed and call me in the morning" may actually do cold sufferers more harm than good, a new study suggests. And aspirin substitutes such as Tylenol and Nuprin are no better, says the report in the December Journal of Infectious Diseases.A group of Australian researchers led by Dr. Neil M. H. Graham studied 56 volunteers infected with a cold virus and fed various pain relievers or a placebo. The doctors found that all common over-the-counter pain relievers worsened some cold symptoms and suppressed some natural responses of the body's immune system.
HEALTH
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,New York Times Syndicate | October 2, 1990
Even for those of us in excellent shape, it's common for muscles to feel sore the day after a hard workout. And although taking aspirin may relieve your pains temporarily, it also can delay your recovery.When your muscles feel sore, the best treatment is to take the day off. Don't even stretch.The soreness you feel is caused by bleeding into and damage to the microscopic fibers of your muscles. Exercising with damaged muscles can cause a larger, more serious muscle tear. Then you won't be able to exercise at all.If you are unable -- or unwilling -- to take the day off, you should exercise at a relaxed pace in another sport that stresses muscles other than the ones that feel sore.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
My wife has recently developed diabetes and watches her sugar intake carefully. She uses Equal to sweeten her coffee or iced tea. We read that Equal might be helpful against arthritis pain, but her doctor has never heard of this. He prescribed Vioxx, but it is too expensive. Aspirin and ibuprofen are cheap, but they give her heartburn. Is it true that Equal might work? If so, how much does it take? Research published in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (May 1998) showed that aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | February 14, 2008
One out of three adults takes an aspirin a day to prevent a heart attack. But after two decades of research, doctors are still divided over how much aspirin they should take. Some researchers believe a low-dose, 81-milligram "baby aspirin" is good enough to reduce the risk of heart attacks -- and they say thousands suffer from unnecessary stomach bleeding because they take a standard 325-milligram pill. "Too many people are taking a full dose of aspirin," said Dr. Jeffrey Berger, a cardiologist at Duke University Medical Center.
NEWS
June 21, 2007
INsideToday What They're saying Today's Sun Columnists Don't buy into iPhone's hype No matter how insanely great Apple's new iPhone appears, there are good reasons to wait before buying one, or deciding not to. Business baltimoresun.com/ himowitz A fresh start for Orioles? The introduction of Andy MacPhail as president of baseball operations has at least the feel of a fresh start for the Orioles. But has he really been given the reins? Sports baltimoresun.com/schmuck other voices David Steele on the OriolesSports Childs Walker on Fantasy SportsSports Dan Rodricks on Baltimore crimeMaryland Roch Kubatko, Kevin Eck blog excerptsSports BETTER THAN EZRAThe '90s rockers perform a free concert on the plaza at Power Plant Live, 34 Market Place.
FEATURES
By Sindya N. Bhanoo and Sindya N. Bhanoo,Sun Reporter | June 21, 2007
Seventy-eight-year-old Joseph Dollard golfs several times a week. He supplements that with swimming, gardening and long walks. You would not guess from his lean physique and bright eyes that he had a heart attack at age 34, or that he's been taking a daily dose of pills ever since to avoid another. Among them was a 325 milligram aspirin pill, prescribed by a cardiologist 40 years ago and continued by Dollard's current cardiologist, Dr. Paul Gurbel of Sinai Hospital. But the results of a recent study by Gurbel and his team at Sinai's Center for Thrombosis Research indicate Dollard may be better off taking half that much.
NEWS
June 18, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Taking a belated stand It shouldn't have taken until now, but players in the Orioles' clubhouse are finally deflecting some heat from their manager by accepting the blame for the club's poor start this season. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele Dealing with baggage If you plan to fly this summer, you're already steeling yourself for long lines, security hassles and endless delays, But that's nothing compared to the baggage carousel.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | April 13, 2007
My mother was admitted to the hospital recently for dehydration, bronchitis and pneumonia. When they checked her blood level of Coumadin, it was 10 times higher than normal. The doctors in the emergency room were shocked. My mother was taking Cymbalta as well as Coumadin. The doctor who prescribed the antidepressant for my mother didn't know about this interaction. It is not listed in the prescribing information. Please warn others of this drug interaction, as it may save someone's life.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Chris Emery and Jonathan Bor and Chris Emery,Sun reporters | February 20, 2007
Women should try to reduce their lifetime risk of heart attack and stroke by exercising more and watching their diet from an early age, the American Heart Association said in guidelines released yesterday. The group suggests, among other things, that women exercise a half-hour daily - not just three or four times weekly as previously recommended. The recommendation goes up to 60 to 90 minutes for those who are overweight. But the organization backed off slightly from its previous recommendations on aspirin as preventive medicine, saying women under 65 should consider taking it only if they have risk factors for stroke.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | October 27, 1992
Q: I have read about the benefits of aspirin for the prevention of heart attacks but have hesitated to take it regularly because of my diabetes. Is aspirin safe in people with diabetes?A: A study of 3,711 diabetic patients between the ages of 18 and 70 found that daily aspirin, compared with a placebo, produced a small but significant decrease in the frequency of fatal and non-fatal heart attacks over a five- to seven-year period. There was no difference between the two groups in the overall death rate.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | March 8, 1991
Aspirin, already shown to protect against heart disease and stroke, may also protect against colon cancer.Patients who took aspirin at least four times a week for at least three months were half as likely to develop colon cancer as were patients who did not take aspirin, according to Dr. Lynn Rosenberg of the School of Public Health at the Boston University School of Medicine.The exact amount of aspirin taken was not known, Dr. Rosenberg said.The 11-year study compared 1,326 colon cancer patients with 4,891 patients who had other types of cancer or no cancer at all.The study was reported in the March 6 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2007
If you take low-dose aspirin for your heart, can you also take ibuprofen for pain? You can, but the timing is critical. If you take ibuprofen first, it fills up the same molecular site inside platelets that aspirin binds to. If ibuprofen is already there, the aspirin can't bind, which means aspirin's potent anti-clotting action can't get started. To get around this, you can take low-dose aspirin, typically 81 milligrams, in the morning, then wait an hour or two before taking ibuprofen for pain.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | November 15, 2006
Even small amounts of dark chocolate might help to prevent the sort of blood clots that cause heart attacks and strokes, a finding that researchers say could make the treat a routine part of a heart-healthy diet. The benefits of a class of chemicals called flavonols, derived from cacao beans, have been emerging from research for decades. But previous studies have been laboratory investigations involving large doses of flavonols -- equivalent to eating several pounds of chocolate a day. Diane Becker, lead author of a study presented yesterday, said it is the first one to find a significant effect in people who ate chocolate in amounts that chocolate lovers more typically consume.
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