Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAspin
IN THE NEWS

Aspin

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 10, 1993
Tucked away in Defense Secretary Les Aspin's proposed Pentagon budget reductions are increases for at least two politically charged weapons programs still awaiting justification. Congress will have to determine if another Seawolf nuclear submarine, at $2 billion a pop, fulfills real defense needs or just a Clinton campaign promise. It should also decide whether former Defense Secretary Dick Cheney was right, after all, in opposing a V-22 Osprey aircraft program that could cost $30 billion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 22, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Far more serious than the short-term consequences of some poorly armored vehicles in Iraq are the potential long-term consequences of putting female soldiers in ground combat units. Critics of placing women in combat units say the Army is manipulating language in rules governing such placement to achieve a social objective that would substantially and significantly change the way America fights wars and possibly put all soldiers -- men and women -- at greater risk. What has raised concerns is a Nov. 29 briefing by a senior Army officer responsible for Army personnel issues at the Pentagon, along with a civilian.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 17, 1993
Devotees of the "Peter Principle," which posits that people rise to their level of incompetence, will be fortified by the sad story of Les Aspin's woes as secretary of Defense and eagerly watching whether his designated successor, retired Adm. Bobby Ray Inman, also has limits yet to be revealed. Both men are brilliant, steeped in the esoterica of military science and dedicated to a strong defense. Where they differ is in method and personality.Mr. Aspin gives the appearance of a rumpled professor, ever searching for new ideas and enjoying the interplay of his intellect with the great game of politics.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The lingering memory of 30 years of association with the late Les Aspin, the Wisconsin congressman who served for nearly a year as President Clinton's first secretary of defense, is one of a man endlessly pushing a boulder uphill.The first encounters came in the mid-1960s when he was toiling as an eager-beaver 27-year-old "whiz kid" under Defense Secretary Robert McNamara at the Pentagon. He was then, as he continued to be thereafter, an intense, earnest and intellectual student of military problems and strategies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 16, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Les Aspin's sudden departure as secretary of defense yesterday was preceded by a loss of confidence in his leadership by senior U.S. military commanders, an unwillingness on his part to make deeper cuts in Pentagon spending and a fateful decision that may have cost American lives in Somalia.Shortly after President Clinton announced he was accepting Mr. Aspin's resignation, one veteran defense official who knew Mr. Aspin well sought to sum up his brief Pentagon stint."Les was just in over his head," the official said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The departing defense secretary, Les Aspin, may be staying on the Pentagon payroll after all.Mr. Aspin has told his designated successor, Bobby Ray Inman, that he would like to serve on a high-level Pentagon commission that will study how to reduce duplication in the roles and missions of the armed forces, perhaps even as the panel's HTC chairman. Congress created the panel when it approved the military budget last year.Associates say Mr. Inman, who is expected to be confirmed as defense secretary by the Senate later this month, is "intrigued" by the idea of appointing Mr. Aspin to study one of the most vexing problems facing the military.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After earlier rejecting a proposal that he found too restrictive, Defense Secretary Les Aspin now has approved a new general policy that will allow women to serve in some ground units during combat, say Pentagon officials.Kathleen deLaski, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said yesterday that the new policy will be announced later this week -- coming just before Mr. Aspin is scheduled to resign from his post this month.Throughout his yearlong tenure, Mr. Aspin has pushed hard for opening up more combat opportunities for female soldiers and last April announced that women would be permitted to serve in combat aviation jobs and on warships.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Les Aspin ordered a top-level review yesterday into mismanagement of the $81 billion Defense Business Operations Fund, which senior defense officials said could lead to the replacement of the troubled financial management system.Mr. Aspin announced the review after The Sun reported Sunday that the fund, which was created two years ago to help the Pentagon fix planes, feed troops and buy toilet paper more efficiently, has become such a financial mess that it has no credible records of the way tax dollars are being spent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, has tried to slip classified information into 14 of his letters from prison, Defense Secretary Les Aspin has told the White House.In one of his final acts in office, Mr. Aspin told President Clinton in a confidential letter last week that Pollard should not be given leniency, as American Jewish groups and the Israeli government have requested, because the Pentagon still considers him to be a security risk and because of the severity of his offenses.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 24, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The lingering memory of 30 years of association with the late Les Aspin, the Wisconsin congressman who served for nearly a year as President Clinton's first secretary of defense, is one of a man endlessly pushing a boulder uphill.The first encounters came in the mid-1960s when he was toiling as an eager-beaver 27-year-old "whiz kid" under Defense Secretary Robert McNamara at the Pentagon. He was then, as he continued to be thereafter, an intense, earnest and intellectual student of military problems and strategies.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Deputy Defense Secretary William J. Perry, the leading candidate to succeed Les Aspin as secretary, told the White House on Saturday that he did not want the job, Pentagon officials reported yesterday, but the administration has mounted a major effort to change his mind.Mark D. Gearan, the White House communications director, said last night that the administration considers Mr. Perry "very much the running" for the job. He said preliminary vetting of his record had begun. But a close friend of Mr. Perry said the deputy secretary was "still quite reluctant on this."
NEWS
January 20, 1994
The nation can consider itself fortunate that retired Adm. Bobby Ray Inman will not be the next secretary of defense. While we welcomed his nomination in these columns and mistakenly described him as "cool and orderly," his bizarre withdrawal from consideration revealed he is anything but.His suspicions that Republican Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole and New York Times columnist William Safire conspired against him bordered on the paranoid. His attack on a "new McCarthyism" in the press clashed with the favorable treatment given his selection in the media and his own years as a trusted and trusting inside source on security matters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The departing defense secretary, Les Aspin, may be staying on the Pentagon payroll after all.Mr. Aspin has told his designated successor, Bobby Ray Inman, that he would like to serve on a high-level Pentagon commission that will study how to reduce duplication in the roles and missions of the armed forces, perhaps even as the panel's HTC chairman. Congress created the panel when it approved the military budget last year.Associates say Mr. Inman, who is expected to be confirmed as defense secretary by the Senate later this month, is "intrigued" by the idea of appointing Mr. Aspin to study one of the most vexing problems facing the military.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon announced a new policy yesterday that would allow women to serve in some combat support jobs, but skeptics immediately questioned how fully the Army and Marine Corps -- both of which are reluctant to make any sweeping changes -- would carry it out.Under the new plan, which will take effect next Oct. 1, women still would be barred from direct ground combat assignments. But they no longer would be excluded from other military specialties merely because the jobs are dangerous.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After earlier rejecting a proposal that he found too restrictive, Defense Secretary Les Aspin now has approved a new general policy that will allow women to serve in some ground units during combat, say Pentagon officials.Kathleen deLaski, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said yesterday that the new policy will be announced later this week -- coming just before Mr. Aspin is scheduled to resign from his post this month.Throughout his yearlong tenure, Mr. Aspin has pushed hard for opening up more combat opportunities for female soldiers and last April announced that women would be permitted to serve in combat aviation jobs and on warships.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, bowing to opposition from conservatives, has decided to drop the controversial nomination Morton H. Halperin as assistant secretary of defense for peacekeeping, officials here say.The White House was expected to announce today that Mr. Halperin, 55, a former National Security Council staffer and civil libertarian, has asked that his name be withdrawn from consideration.Administration officials said the Pentagon also will eliminate the new peacekeeping post, which had been created by outgoing Defense Secretary Les Aspin when officials expected heavy U.S. participation in such operations.
NEWS
By James R. Carroll and James R. Carroll,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- An Air Force general was fired and two other generals and a top civilian official were disciplined yesterday for nearly $450 million in improper payments to the contractor for the C-17 cargo plane, McDonnell Douglas Corp.The actions followed a Pentagon inspector general's report alleging that the nation's largest defense contractor was paid for C-17 work not done, and that some transactions between the company and the government were possibly illegal.Defense Secretary Les Aspin removed Maj. Gen. MichaelButchko Jr. as commander of the Air Force Development Test Center at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida as punishment for poor management of the contract for the plane.
NEWS
By Richard H.P. Sia and Richard H.P. Sia,Washington Bureau | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Les Aspin said yesterday he would not resign amid continued criticism of his failure to grant a request for tanks that might have saved U.S. Rangers in Somalia."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, has tried to slip classified information into 14 of his letters from prison, Defense Secretary Les Aspin has told the White House.In one of his final acts in office, Mr. Aspin told President Clinton in a confidential letter last week that Pollard should not be given leniency, as American Jewish groups and the Israeli government have requested, because the Pentagon still considers him to be a security risk and because of the severity of his offenses.
NEWS
By SUZANNE GARMENT | December 26, 1993
Washington. -- Secretary of Defense Les Aspin has quit. The White House definitely wielded the hook; one day after the resignation, President Clinton cheerfully presented the nation with Mr. Aspin's successor.Still, Mr. Aspin was not dragged off the stage kicking and screaming. Rather, he seemed wearily resigned, burdened by his own mistakes and his wounds from the political battles he had been forced to fight.The news media portrayed the change as a "classic White House shuffle." Yet, Mr. Clinton has suffered several high-level losses since summer, in a pattern that makes his administration something of an anomaly on the Washington scene.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.