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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
A deal that would have a Laurel-based quarry company buy the asphalt-making and road-construction business of Reston, Va.-based Lafarge Corp. is taking longer to complete than insiders in the local road-construction business had expected.Industry sources say Laurel Sand & Gravel has outbid a consortium of local contractors to buy the assets, which Lafarge acquired last year when it bought Towson-based Redland Genstar Inc. as part of a $690 million deal. Lafarge put the asphalt plants and road-paving business up for sale last fall because they did not fit with Lafarge's core mining business -- and because they put the company into direct competition with customers who bought its sand and crushed stone, ingredients of concrete or blacktop for roads.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | November 20, 2006
On a crisp fall day outside Franklin Square Elementary School, children fill the playground. A group of boys and girls scout for butterflies in a garden. Others run around the grass, their bulky coats half-buttoned in the breeze. There's nothing remarkable or shocking about this scene in the large yard at the corner of Lexington and Calhoun streets in West Baltimore - but just last year, it would have been unthinkable. For decades, all of Franklin Square's 2-acre playground was asphalt - much of it cracked, covered in broken glass and weeds.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1999
County officials have given the go-ahead to a proposed asphalt plant in northern Anne Arundel County that has come under strong criticism from elected officials and residents worried about environmental pollution in the area.They maintain that important questions about the project's operations remain unanswered, and that the facility does not belong in an area that for years has been affected by poor air quality."This is another blatant attempt to pollute North County," said community activist Marcia Drenzyk, referring to the concentration of heavy industry in the area.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
Craters and cracks mar a short stretch of the new Shepherds Mill Road near Union Bridge and the surface must be removed and replaced with new asphalt by the contractor, Carroll County officials said. The 1 1/4 -mile road opened to truck traffic in April, to the relief of Union Bridge officials. The $2.2 million stretch that connects to Route 75 was designed to draw heavy cement trucks from the Lehigh Cement Co. off the town's Main Street. "There are a few areas where the surface paving has failed," said Deborah A. Butler, acting chief of the bureau of engineering for the county Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
A fatal accident and a dump truck that spilled asphalt on a roadway snarled traffic for hours yesterday in Anne Arundel County, delaying school buses and commuters throughout the morning while parts of Interstate 97 and Route 100 were closed, authorities said. Travis Stephen Dyer, 26, was killed when his pickup veered off the westbound side of Route 100 near Lake Waterford Road, struck a guardrail and overturned. Dyer, of Pasadena, was not wearing his seat belt, state police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after the 6:50 a.m. accident.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
After decades of fast growth, and all the pavement that comes with it, Howard County is accustomed to construction. Yesterday, work crews engaged in a little deconstruction. Seeking to restore a plot of county-owned land to its natural state, highway workers rolled onto an old, long unused segment of road in Columbia with an excavator and dump trucks and proceeded to rip the asphalt off the landscape. They expect to have all 640 feet of pavement hauled out by today. "It's mostly putting in for us," said Don Ashley, who has spent 30 years in the local bureau of highways, supervising the construction of curbs sidewalks and other such additions.
BUSINESS
By Josh Shaffer and Ellen Schroeder and Josh Shaffer and Ellen Schroeder,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 5, 2003
FORT WORTH, Texas - Amid the concrete and asphalt of south Arlington, traces of a howling wilderness remain. Walk five steps into the woods off Hidden Oaks Lane and the street disappears, hidden by vines and twisting branches. These oaks once stretched to Kansas in an unbroken grove, a forest too dense for the pioneer's ax and too hardy for the scorching Texas summer. Now the remnants that survived the bulldozer mingle with basketball goals and satellite dishes. The disappearance of the trees is a testament to Texas' dwindling supply of open land, from the untouched forests and prairies to the ranches and farms that replaced them.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | August 30, 1992
CARACAS, Venezuela -- The driving is easy. The road is smooth. And then, suddenly, the car spins and swirls out of control as it skates along a layer of goo that mysteriously covers highways here.Venezuelans call the goo La Mancha Negra -- the black stain -- but it's really more like a blob, a thick black sludge with the consistency of chewing gum. No one knows where it comes from. No one knows how to get rid of it.Some say it's oil from lousy asphalt. Others say it's oil from car engines.
NEWS
October 25, 1994
POLICE LOG* Elkridge: 6600 block of Route 1: An officer responding to an alarm at Dougal's Korner found that the front glass door had been smashed with a piece of asphalt Saturday. Police said there was no entry.
NEWS
September 23, 1999
THE BATTLE goes on for residents of northern Anne Arundel County. During the past 30 years, they have fought waste incinerators, fly ash, trash transfer stations and an oil refinery. Now they are waging a campaign against a proposed asphalt products plant.You have to have sympathy for North County residents, just like the Wagner's Point residents across the city-county border who were beseiged by industrial polluters until the city bought out their homes.The area has a heavy concentration of businesses that are important for job growth but that nobody wants in their backyards.
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