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By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
Raising concerns among neighbors who say it wasn't what they had in mind for western Anne Arundel County, a sand and gravel company has applied to state officials to build an asphalt manufacturing plant in Annapolis Junction. Laurel Sand and Gravel, which owns the property off Brock Bridge Road near Route 32 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, wants to open a 400-ton-per-hour asphalt plant to complement its asphalt manufacturing operations at a plant in Prince George's County. The plant would produce blacktop for roads and rooftops.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
Raising concerns among neighbors who say it wasn't what they had in mind for western Anne Arundel County, a sand and gravel company has applied to state officials to build an asphalt manufacturing plant in Annapolis Junction. Laurel Sand and Gravel, which owns the property off Brock Bridge Road near Route 32 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, wants to open a 400-ton-per-hour asphalt plant to complement its asphalt manufacturing operations at a plant in Prince George's County. The plant would produce blacktop for roads and rooftops.
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NEWS
November 12, 1999
STRANGE things are sprouting in Marylands farm fields. Like an asphalt plant in a Kent County cornfield. Like a golf course on a Carroll County farm. Like mobile communication towers all over the countryside.And, of course, the burgeoning crops of houses and subdivisions on once green acres.Less land is needed these days for agricultural production; other uses are more lucrative -- for the developer and the county treasury. And for local employment. So in spite of high-sounding rhetoric about farmland preservation by Maryland and the counties, the states agricultural open spaces continue to shrink.
NEWS
November 12, 1999
STRANGE things are sprouting in Marylands farm fields. Like an asphalt plant in a Kent County cornfield. Like a golf course on a Carroll County farm. Like mobile communication towers all over the countryside.And, of course, the burgeoning crops of houses and subdivisions on once green acres.Less land is needed these days for agricultural production; other uses are more lucrative -- for the developer and the county treasury. And for local employment. So in spite of high-sounding rhetoric about farmland preservation by Maryland and the counties, the states agricultural open spaces continue to shrink.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
MASSEY -- The Kent County planning board has approved plans for building an asphalt plant in a cornfield on the edge of this town near the Delaware line. Neighbors fear an environmental disaster.The approval came last week after the county commission rewrote the zoning law in July to accommodate David C. Bramble, a prominent Eastern Shore paving contractor.Opponents say a plant at the headwaters of Swantown Creek, a tributary of the Sassafras River, would destroy wetlands and habitat for salamanders, pollute water and affect the flavor of the milk from Lester "Bucky" Jones' cows on an adjacent farm.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | October 11, 1991
The residents of Rosedale and Chesaco in eastern Baltimore County say they don't want the solution to a national environmental problem built in their backyard.The problem is the millions of tons of soil contaminated with gasoline from leaking underground tanks across the state and nation. Several companies think one practical solution is to put the soil into a kiln and burn off the petroleum.Residents call it incineration. The companies call it soil reclamation.The Bryn Awel Corp. wants to build a plant at Pulaski Highway and Todd Lane that will take about 300,000 tons of contaminated soil a year and turn it into asphalt and crushed stone.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1999
County officials have given the go-ahead to a proposed asphalt plant in northern Anne Arundel County that has come under strong criticism from elected officials and residents worried about environmental pollution in the area.They maintain that important questions about the project's operations remain unanswered, and that the facility does not belong in an area that for years has been affected by poor air quality."This is another blatant attempt to pollute North County," said community activist Marcia Drenzyk, referring to the concentration of heavy industry.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
State environmental officials have given preliminary approval to a Quebec company's proposal to build a $10 million asphalt manufacturing plant near Curtis Bay in northern Anne Arundel County.The proposed site near 6000 Pennington Ave. is in a heavily industrial area, and was previously owned by Crown Central Petroleum Corp.The state's Air and Radiation Management Administration has tentatively decided to approve the application for a construction permit filed by the company, Bitumar Inc.Emissions dataEmissions released as part of the manufacturing process for a Bitumar product -- called Ecoflex asphalt cement -- are within limits set by state and federal environmental agencies, according to the permit application.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 22, 2005
About 23,000 gallons of hot asphalt spilled onto the base of a smokestack in a southeast Baltimore asphalt plant yesterday, starting a fire that sent black clouds of smoke skyward and brought a hazardous materials task force to the scene, the city Fire Department reported. No one was injured in the fire, which was reported about 3:15 p.m. at the GAF Materials Corp. plant at 1500 S. Ponca St., which makes asphalt roof shingles. The spilled asphalt was contained within a walled area made of bricks, the Fire Department said.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
An asphalt manufacturer, seeking permission to expand its 35-year-old gravel mining business, insisted yesterday it has answered the noise and traffic concerns of its Gambrills neighbors.But residents told a county hearing officer that they still oppose the request by BBSS Inc., which operates the Reliable Asphalt plant at Route 3 and Brickhead Road, to mine another 72 acres between Brickhead and Evergreen roads.Willis Montgomery, 70, who lives on Evergreen Road, complained that his community is being encircled by "these big holes," referring to BBSS' existing 130-acre sand and gravel operation and other mines in the vicinity.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
MASSEY -- The Kent County planning board has approved plans for building an asphalt plant in a cornfield on the edge of this town near the Delaware line. Neighbors fear an environmental disaster.The approval came last week after the county commission rewrote the zoning law in July to accommodate David C. Bramble, a prominent Eastern Shore paving contractor.Opponents say a plant at the headwaters of Swantown Creek, a tributary of the Sassafras River, would destroy wetlands and habitat for salamanders, pollute water and affect the flavor of the milk from Lester "Bucky" Jones' cows on an adjacent farm.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1999
County officials have given the go-ahead to a proposed asphalt plant in northern Anne Arundel County that has come under strong criticism from elected officials and residents worried about environmental pollution in the area.They maintain that important questions about the project's operations remain unanswered, and that the facility does not belong in an area that for years has been affected by poor air quality."This is another blatant attempt to pollute North County," said community activist Marcia Drenzyk, referring to the concentration of heavy industry.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1999
State environmental officials have given preliminary approval to a Quebec company's proposal to build a $10 million asphalt manufacturing plant near Curtis Bay in northern Anne Arundel County.The proposed site near 6000 Pennington Ave. is in a heavily industrial area, and was previously owned by Crown Central Petroleum Corp.The state's Air and Radiation Management Administration has tentatively decided to approve the application for a construction permit filed by the company, Bitumar Inc.Emissions dataEmissions released as part of the manufacturing process for a Bitumar product -- called Ecoflex asphalt cement -- are within limits set by state and federal environmental agencies, according to the permit application.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | October 11, 1991
The residents of Rosedale and Chesaco in eastern Baltimore County say they don't want the solution to a national environmental problem built in their backyard.The problem is the millions of tons of soil contaminated with gasoline from leaking underground tanks across the state and nation. Several companies think one practical solution is to put the soil into a kiln and burn off the petroleum.Residents call it incineration. The companies call it soil reclamation.The Bryn Awel Corp. wants to build a plant at Pulaski Highway and Todd Lane that will take about 300,000 tons of contaminated soil a year and turn it into asphalt and crushed stone.
SPORTS
By Jennifer Lenhart and Jennifer Lenhart,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1991
NAPLES, Fla. -- It's not a done deal yet, but Baltimore Orioles officials spoke officially and optimistically yesterday about plans for a spring-training complex.Orioles officials, confirming reports that leaked out Saturday, said they had agreed in principle to join with Florida Rock Industries Inc. in a deal to move the team to a new complex in Naples.Florida Rock will provide the land -- 310 acres, of which about 85 will be used to build a 6,000- to 7,000-seat stadium and five or six practice fields for the Orioles.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1999
County officials have given the go-ahead to a proposed asphalt plant in northern Anne Arundel County that has come under strong criticism from elected officials and residents worried about environmental pollution in the area.They maintain that important questions about the project's operations remain unanswered, and that the facility does not belong in an area that for years has been affected by poor air quality."This is another blatant attempt to pollute North County," said community activist Marcia Drenzyk, referring to the concentration of heavy industry in the area.
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