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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
ASHCROFT, Colo. - The big noise here is the wind in Castle Creek Valley, nothing more. The chief activity consists of occasional gusts of snow, skimming along the creek edge like running ground fog. Look way down the valley and chances are you won't see another soul. Stop if you like and take in the jagged mountaintops in the distance playing peek-a-boo with winter sun and clouds. Or shuffle on at your own pace. This, too, is skiing.True, it's not the sort of thing pictured on the Aspen travel posters, trending as they do toward images of skiers hurtling down slopes at acute angles, powder exploding, poles flying like javelins in a moment of exhilarating speed.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
ASHCROFT, Colo. - The big noise here is the wind in Castle Creek Valley, nothing more. The chief activity consists of occasional gusts of snow, skimming along the creek edge like running ground fog. Look way down the valley and chances are you won't see another soul. Stop if you like and take in the jagged mountaintops in the distance playing peek-a-boo with winter sun and clouds. Or shuffle on at your own pace. This, too, is skiing.True, it's not the sort of thing pictured on the Aspen travel posters, trending as they do toward images of skiers hurtling down slopes at acute angles, powder exploding, poles flying like javelins in a moment of exhilarating speed.
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NEWS
March 1, 1995
Friedl Pfeifer, 83, a founder of the ski industry in Aspen, Colo., died of colon cancer Sunday in Paradise Valley, Ariz. A three-time U.S. slalom champion, he helped organize construction of the first chairlift on Aspen Mountain in 1947. The native of Austria also started the Aspen Ski School and the Aspen Ski Club. He was inducted into the Aspen Hall of Fame in 1987.Dr. Joseph Wortis, 80, who introduced insulin shock treatment for schizophrenia in the United States, died Feb. 22 of prostate cancer in New York.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
ASPEN, Colo. - The Mountain Chalet is still the Mountain Chalet, a fixture in town since the days of the $8 room and the $1.50 lift ticket. But what happened to the mountain? Chalet guests on the south side of the building cannot see Aspen Mountain from their windows any longer, not since the big luxury hotel across the road went up and up, red stones rising four stories, blocking a splendid view.On the other hand, there's a study in contrast: the humble, 51-room Chalet with its wooden faux Tyrolean facade next to the St. Regis Aspen, all 257 rooms of it, commanding the mountain base with the hauteur of a European castle.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 1, 1998
Michael L. Kennedy, brother of Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, was killed in a skiing accident in Aspen, Colo., yesterday afternoon.Kennedy suffered a major head injury when he crashed into a tree while downhill skiing with unidentified family members about 4 p.m."Ethel Kennedy and her family are mourning the loss of their beloved Michael, who was fatally injured while skiing with his family in Aspen," according to a statement released by the family last night.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service * | November 17, 1991
Paragliding -- in which participants take off from a mountain slope and float to the valley below -- will be offered to visitors signing up for a three-day course at Aspen, Colo., this winter. Paragliders can control their descent by manipulating the wing, as if they were coming down by parachute.The lessons, scheduled to begin at Thanksgiving, will be given by the Aspen Paragliding School at the base of Tiehack-Buttermilk Mountain and at the Snowmass Lodge and Golf Course. The twice-weekly courses will cost $375 a person and consist of one day of ground school, with students learning how to handle the canopylike wing without flying, and two days of short flights originating at either Tiehack-Buttermilk or Snowmass.
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye and Susan Kaye,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 1996
The upstart resort called Vail on the other side of the Sawatch Mountains is stealing headlines with its massive buyout of Breckenridge and Keystone.Overnight, Aspen, Colo. -- the grande dame of Western ski resorts -- is the little guy on the block.But before Vail was even a gleam in a developer's eye, Aspen had a star-studded following that raved about its extraordinary ski mountain and the eccentric town at its base.This winter, Aspen celebrates its 50th year as a ski resort. There will be parties, parades, fireworks and hoopla.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | November 29, 1998
ASPEN, Colo. - The Mountain Chalet is still the Mountain Chalet, a fixture in town since the days of the $8 room and the $1.50 lift ticket. But what happened to the mountain? Chalet guests on the south side of the building cannot see Aspen Mountain from their windows any longer, not since the big luxury hotel across the road went up and up, red stones rising four stories, blocking a splendid view.On the other hand, there's a study in contrast: the humble, 51-room Chalet with its wooden faux Tyrolean facade next to the St. Regis Aspen, all 257 rooms of it, commanding the mountain base with the hauteur of a European castle.
NEWS
March 1, 1999
Richard R. Shinn, 81, who joined MetLife as a $15-a-week mailroom employee in 1939 and rose to become chairman and chief executive officer, died Friday in Greenwich, Conn.Under his leadership, MetLife became the industry's foremost provider of group insurance and entered the property and casualty insurance and reinsurance business.He assumed key roles in national and state public policy issues, including membership on the panel that averted New York City's financial crisis in the mid-1970s.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
Two days after she graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park with a bachelor's in public relations in December 1991, Jennifer Gardner left her parents' home in Severna Park and moved to Aspen, Colo."
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 1, 1998
Michael L. Kennedy, brother of Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and son of the late Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, was killed in a skiing accident in Aspen, Colo., yesterday afternoon.Kennedy suffered a major head injury when he crashed into a tree while downhill skiing with unidentified family members about 4 p.m."Ethel Kennedy and her family are mourning the loss of their beloved Michael, who was fatally injured while skiing with his family in Aspen," according to a statement released by the family last night.
FEATURES
By Susan Kaye and Susan Kaye,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 17, 1996
The upstart resort called Vail on the other side of the Sawatch Mountains is stealing headlines with its massive buyout of Breckenridge and Keystone.Overnight, Aspen, Colo. -- the grande dame of Western ski resorts -- is the little guy on the block.But before Vail was even a gleam in a developer's eye, Aspen had a star-studded following that raved about its extraordinary ski mountain and the eccentric town at its base.This winter, Aspen celebrates its 50th year as a ski resort. There will be parties, parades, fireworks and hoopla.
NEWS
March 1, 1995
Friedl Pfeifer, 83, a founder of the ski industry in Aspen, Colo., died of colon cancer Sunday in Paradise Valley, Ariz. A three-time U.S. slalom champion, he helped organize construction of the first chairlift on Aspen Mountain in 1947. The native of Austria also started the Aspen Ski School and the Aspen Ski Club. He was inducted into the Aspen Hall of Fame in 1987.Dr. Joseph Wortis, 80, who introduced insulin shock treatment for schizophrenia in the United States, died Feb. 22 of prostate cancer in New York.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service * | November 17, 1991
Paragliding -- in which participants take off from a mountain slope and float to the valley below -- will be offered to visitors signing up for a three-day course at Aspen, Colo., this winter. Paragliders can control their descent by manipulating the wing, as if they were coming down by parachute.The lessons, scheduled to begin at Thanksgiving, will be given by the Aspen Paragliding School at the base of Tiehack-Buttermilk Mountain and at the Snowmass Lodge and Golf Course. The twice-weekly courses will cost $375 a person and consist of one day of ground school, with students learning how to handle the canopylike wing without flying, and two days of short flights originating at either Tiehack-Buttermilk or Snowmass.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
From the street, 707 Hillstead Drive in Lutherville appears as a lovely Swiss chalet. Located on more than 2 acres of a tree-filled and manicured lawn, the entrance is lined with rounded evergreens, set at intervals along a flagstone path to a pair of heavy wood doors with multi-paned glass. The half-timber exterior and partial A-frame structure will not disappoint those desiring an Aspen-like mountain ambience. "This home is like two houses," noted listing agent Cindy Conklin of Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty in Federal Hill.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | January 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - Our family spent winter vacation in Colorado, and one day I saw the most unusual sight: two women marching around the Aspen Mountain ski lift, waving signs protesting against war in Iraq. One sign said: "Just War or Just Oil?" As I watched this two-woman demonstration, I couldn't help noticing the auto traffic whizzing by them: one gas-guzzling SUV or Jeep after another, with even a Humvee or two tossed in for good measure. The whole scene made me wonder whether those two women weren't - indeed - asking the right question: Is the war that the Bush team is preparing to launch in Iraq really a war for oil?
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