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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | December 28, 1992
I'VE just returned from Aspen even though I am not a skier. haven't skied in some of the greatest winter resorts in the world. I know that this is a terrible thing to admit. It's like saying, "I'm in sales but I don't play golf." But that's the way it is.I go to places like Aspen because I enjoy sitting in hotel lobbies in front of large fireplaces, drinking hot chocolate and talking about weather conditions on the various mountains that I haven't been on.I also like to go into town and try on ski clothes and buy Briko's snow goggles to wear over my wool cap.Occasionally I'll meet another person who doesn't ski, and then we'll throw snowballs at each other.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Katrina Galsim | January 25, 2012
"The altitude's kinda giving me a bit of a headache. Does anyone got (an), Aspen ?" Oh, Steven Tyler. It was so funny I forgot to laugh. " American Idol " travels to Aspen, Colo., for the first time, where we learn about Rocky Mountain Oysters and witness the enigma that is the Magic Cyclops guy. Let us take a look at the notable auditions, shall we? Eighteen-year-old flower child Haley Smith has three jobs and loves nature. She sang "Tell Me Something Good" and I gotta say, great control, great voice.
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NEWS
By Doug Birch | February 24, 1991
Evidence uncovered by federal safety investigators suggests that a series of misjudgments by the crew preceded the Feb. 13 crash of a Lear jet in Aspen, Colo., that killed Baltimore businessman Harold N. Goldsmith, some experienced pilots said Friday."It's hard to second-guess in something like this, but it sounds like he [the pilot] got it too low, too slow and tried to fly the plane the way you can't," said Robert Cadwalader, a veteran corporate jet pilot from the Baltimore area.An ongoing National Transportation Safety Board investigation has not found any mechanical problems with the aircraft, said Arnold W. Scott, an NTSB investigator based in Denver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 26, 2010
W hen it opened in the spring of 2006, the Performing Arts Theater in the University of Baltimore's Student Center boasted an attractive, intimate ambience and good acoustics - not to mention a new, nine-foot Steinway piano chosen for the room, by no less than eminent pianist Yefim Bronfman. Different classical music enterprises have come and gone in that 200-seat space, including a chamber series featuring Baltimore Symphony Orchestra players and a piano recital series. Nothing has taken hold.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | February 15, 1991
The crash of a chartered Lear jet a half-mile short of the airport in Aspen, Colo., has killed Baltimore businessman and philanthropist Harold N. Goldsmith, co-founder of the Merry-Go-Round Enterprises clothing-store chain and owner of Eastern Savings Bank.A publicity-shy executive who was a leader in fund-raising for Jewish charities, Mr. Goldsmith, 48, grew up in East Baltimore above his father's grocery store. He was one of the "Diner" guys whose friendship was the focus of movie director Barry Levinson's 1982 film of the same name.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1998
ASPEN, Colo. -- The cards seem real enough. At least Ted Carpenter can take them out of his pocket, hold them in his hands and say he's got something to show for three nights' work at the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival. They're not tarot cards, but they might as well be for the mysterious power they suggest. As if the Hanged Man or the Emperor himself walked up to Carpenter and said: great show, nice work, let's talk.Instead, these talismans come from an agent in Beverly Hills and a manager of casting for Disney Studios, among others.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 7, 1991
A Rockville company has won a contract worth up to $139 million to help the U.S. Justice Department electronically file and catalog some of the millions of documents it churns out each year.Aspen Systems Corp., an information management firm, will build customized computer data bases to keep track of the mountains of paperwork generated by the Justice Department's Civil Division, Aspen President Albert Lampert said.The deal pays Aspen a guaranteed $300,000 for one year and gives the Justice Department the option of adding four one-year contract extensions, department spokesman Eric Donovan said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 13, 1997
County police raided a home in Shady Side Friday night and reported arresting three people and seizing a small amount of crack cocaine and drug equipment.Police said the raid at 9: 20 p.m. ended a monthlong investigation into drug activities at the home in the 4900 block of Aspen St.Arrested and charged with possession of drugs and drug paraphernalia were Michael Everett Jones, 52, and Annette Jones, 38, both of the Aspen Street address, and Carl R. Thompson, 41, of Churchton, police said.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1998
If you're looking for the most affluent communities to reside in, don't spend your time hunting around the mid-Atlantic states. Go to Aspen, Colo., Hilton Head, S.C., or even La Jolla, Calif.All of the aforementioned cities were ranked by the Robb Report -- a consumer magazine that features luxury lifestyles -- as among the 10 most affluent cities in America.Aspen was No. 1, followed by Palm Beach, Fla.; Greenwich, Conn.; Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich.; Kapalua, Hawaii; Boca Raton, Fla.; Hilton Head; Gold Coast (Chicago)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 2, 2009
Gift-wrapped bombs force evacuation ASPEN, Colo. : A onetime resident of this city who had been bitter over its transformation into a playground for the rich left four gift-wrapped bombs downtown in a bank-robbery attempt, turning New Year's Eve celebrations into a mass evacuation, police said yesterday. The bombs were made of gasoline and cell phone parts and came with notes warning of "mass death." The 72-year-old man suspected of placing them in two banks and an alleyway on Wednesday shot himself a short time later, police said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
LT. GOV. Michael S. Steele, a conservative Republican, and Montgomery County Council President Tom Perez, a liberal Democrat, will spend a lot of time together over the next two years. Steele and Perez are among the 24 promising young political leaders chosen for the inaugural class of the Aspen Institute-Rodel Fellowships in Public Leadership. Candidates for the fellowship were nominated by business, political and civic leaders and were screened by a 50-member advisory panel that included Democrats Mario Cuomo, Ann Richards and Gary Hart and Republicans Alan Simpson, Jack Kemp and John McCain.
NEWS
By DENVER POST | April 24, 2005
Just about everything in Aspen, Colo., is a cut above average, so it follows that Aspen's finest should patrol the town's star-studded streets in a ride classier than the usual Ford Crown Victoria police cruisers. Since the 1970s, the 27-officer Aspen Police Department has driven a fleet of Saab sedans. But soon the department plans to trade up to Volvo SUVs, a move echoing nearby Vail, where the Swedish-made Volvo has become the official town vehicle. Aspen Mayor Helen Klanderud said the higher-end police vehicles aren't really about maintaining an upscale image, but rather are an effort to be at the head of the pack environmentally.
NEWS
By THE DENVER POST | February 21, 2005
ASPEN, Colo. -- Hunter Stockton Thompson, who coined the term "gonzo journalism" to describe the unique and furiously personal approach to reportage exemplified in his 1972 book Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, died last night of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at his Woody Creek home. He was 67, family members said. Pitkin County Sheriff Bob Braudis, a friend of Thompson's, confirmed the death. Thompson's son, Juan, discovered his body yesterday evening. "Dr. Hunter S. Thompson took his life with a gunshot to the head.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
The crack of gunfire at dawn brought home a chilling truth yesterday for Montgomery County residents: The sniper's route of terror had come full circle as he returned to this affluent suburban community. "We were just starting to feel a little better because the guy was going south," said Jimmy Akca, a mechanic at the Shell gas station in Kensington where a young nanny was killed in the early hours of the string of shootings that started three weeks ago. But with yesterday's brazen shot that killed a bus driver preparing for his daily route, Akca and others said they feared that the sniper had doubled back from recent attacks in Virginia and put Montgomery County back into his scope.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | February 4, 1996
Two days after she graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park with a bachelor's in public relations in December 1991, Jennifer Gardner left her parents' home in Severna Park and moved to Aspen, Colo."
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1998
There are Charles Street in Baltimore and York Road in Towson, and then there's Coon Club Road in Aspen Run.Coon Club Road serves as the main thoroughfare for this very quiet neighborhood that's perched on hills on both sides of the road. It's also a reminder of when Carroll County was all farmland and woods.Its namesake, the Coon Club, is still there and still very active."We still do a little hunting on the 60 acres we have, but mainly we shoot clay birds for sport," said Glenn Caples, owner of Caples Concrete Construction and a 30-year member.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
Saul Herbert Barnett, 72, a Baltimore-born entertainment lawyer and film and theater producer, died of cancer Thursday in Aspen, Colo. Mr. Barnett was a 1947 graduate of City College, and earned his undergraduate and law degrees at New York's Columbia University in the 1950s. He practiced entertainment law in New York City and Beverly Hills, Calif., and dabbled in movies and plays, producing Give 'Em Hell Harry, a theater production starring James Whitmore, and the 1979 Richard Pryor in Concert film.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
W. R. Grace & Co., VerticalNet Inc. and Aspen Technology Inc. announced a business-to-business venture yesterday that will allow industrial customers such as oil refineries and plastics companies to purchase chemical catalysts online. e-Catalysts Inc., which the companies introduced yesterday at a National Petrochemical & Refiners Association conference in San Francisco, is the latest in a retinue of B2B exchanges that traditional companies are launching to stimulate sales online. The Internet offers marketplaces for commodities such as steel, plastics and biomedical supplies.
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