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By John Dorsey | March 13, 1997
P. Randall Whitlock is a self-taught sculptor who has been influenced by Native American art and whose work is abstract and contains aspects of the mythological in its exploration of what he calls "aspects of humanness." His sculptures in the current two-person show at Resurgam include "Quiescence," shown here. The other artist is Catherine Jones, whose landscape paintings are influenced by 19th and 20th century American landscapes as well as by expressionism.At Resurgam Gallery, 910 N. Charles St., noon to 6 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays through March 29. Call (410)
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NEWS
September 19, 2014
Recent events in the news have called attention to domestic violence, particularly in association with the NFL. Ray Rice is at the forefront, but Adrian Peterson has also been charged with child abuse. In the past other star athletes have been charged with sexual abuse or even murder. As a nation we are outraged by the NFL's handling of all these events past and present. Sitting in front of our TVs waiting to see how the NFL and its executives will be punished enthralls us. But how many of us have watched what is unfolding on TV and gotten up to do something to help others who are experiencing violence in their lives, domestic or otherwise?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By [AARON CHESTER] | November 15, 2007
ign.com What's the point? -- IGN is practically an entertainment database. Focusing primarily on video games, the site offers news, reviews, previews, videos, etc. in the categories of movies, TV, games, music, sports and cars. What to look for --All that you would expect in an entertainment site for teenage through young adult males can be found. The video game features are extensive, to say the least, but virtually no aspects of lazy male enjoyment are left uncovered.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Johns Hopkins returned to the NCAA tournament after falling short of the postseason in 2013 for the first time in 42 years. But if the Blue Jays intend to make a deep run in the tournament, they have a couple of areas to address. One is the offense's woes in Saturday's 13-10 loss to Loyola Maryland. The unit was mired in scoring droughts of 16 minutes, 22 seconds spanning the first and second quarters and 17:31 stretching over the third and fourth periods as the Greyhounds mixed a zone defense with their traditional man-to-man schemes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter VIDEO It's a troll, Vern | September 5, 1992
MOVIESDafoe delivers"Light Sleeper" is either a return to form or an imitation of form. It's hard to say which. Written and directed by Paul Schrader, it seems to be another version of Schrader's revered "Taxi Driver." Still, it has some mesmerizing power. Willem Dafoe plays a drug delivery boy who, at 40, begins to wonder what's next for him. Schrader's feel for New York night life is convincing, as is Dafoe's almost childlike performance. R. ** 1/2 . Jim Varney may never be confused with either Francois Truffaut or Frances Ford Coppola or even Francis the Talking Mule, but his flubber-faced impersonation of all-around moron and good guy Ernest P. Worrell deserves some kind of recognition.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Jean Marbella | May 14, 1991
Washington -- Queen Elizabeth's desire to see a baseball game will require a short detour out of Washington during her four-day state visit, which begins today, a Buckingham Palace spokesman said. But, he added, "the queen and Prince Philip are very happy to be going to Baltimore."The queen had asked that her schedule during the U.S. visit be "varied," according to her spokesman, and include such informal events as tomorrow night's Orioles vs. Oakland Athletics game at Memorial Stadium "to enable her to see aspects of American life she hasn't seen before."
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | July 19, 2000
COLLEGE PARK -- To many, it seems perplexing that Palestinians are insisting on Israel's acceptance of the refugees' "right of return" when they should know that no Israeli government will accept the return of more than a limited number of refugees into Israel, lest its Jewish majority be undermined. Back home, many Palestinians are fearful that Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat will "sell" their right of return at Camp David, while many Israelis are fearful that Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak will jeopardize Israel's Jewish character.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 1, 1993
Mel Kendrick's wooden sculpture has been seen as a reaction against minimalism, an attempt to regain sculpture's history by reinventing the figure and incorporating aspects of such early modernist movements as cubism, futurism and constructivism.But his work can be looked at in another way, too, and the current exhibit of sculpture and (something new for him) very large drawings at Grimaldis Gallery suggests such a different approach.In addition to reclaiming history, these works appear to argue for 20th-century abstraction, the ability to express anything that any other period can express.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | January 5, 1998
IT HAS become commonplace to announce that the American public has lost interest in the rest of the world. That may change soon, and should. The American future has tipped a part of its hand. We may not know how everything will turn out in the post-Cold War world, but we can better sense what the argument will sound like.Warming issueConsider some recent situations: Environmentalists and bureaucrats assemble in Kyoto, Japan, to bleat about global warming. Congress rejects the idea of ''fast-track'' trade negotiation.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1999
The clock is running down and the mud is being slung. But Monday, the eve of the primary election that will effectively narrow the candidates for mayor to one, a new campaign will begin that focuses only on positives.While the candidates continue to field questions on how to fix the negatives that plague Baltimore -- the addicts, the exodus, the crime -- the new campaign will tout the city's successes, its pluses, its promises.But do not expect it to endorse a candidate.Monday night, the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc., a nonprofit alliance of business leaders that promotes the downtown area, will release a new media campaign that pitches a "24-hour" downtown.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
Two organizations are collaborating to provide Maryland-specific resources for transgender youth and their families grappling with the legal system. Prompted by a request from PFLAG, legal services organization FreeState Legal created trans*youth@md , a website meant to address legal questions frequently asked by transgender minors and their parents. "We want to help parents figure out what they have to do, what they can do to protect their children," said Catherine Hyde, the transgender coordinator for PFLAG's Howard County chapter and a member of PFLAG's national board of directors.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Fred Schumacher knew the race was worse than he thought it would be when he watched a group of Marines climb into a pickup truck and quit after the first few checkpoints. The first JFK 50 Mile race Schumacher ran, on March 30 1974, offered a particularly difficult challenge in the 34-degree weather and steady rain that turned to sleet for part of the event. Schumacher, a 66-year-old retired Army officer from Frederick, said he had decided to start the race out of complete ignorance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
My mom showed me the spot on her face recently diagnosed as skin cancer. "I showed it to my dermatologist last time, but he just kept saying it was psoriasis," she said. Finally, on her last visit, she insisted he take a closer look, and bingo. Basal cell. "You need a new dermatologist," I said, and she looked at me in dismay. She'd apparently already gone through three others who didn't work out to get to this one. I felt her pain. Finding new doctors is just as much fun as blind dating; you start out hopeful, but chances are good that there might be some sort of compatibility issue, such as his inability to ask you a single thing about yourself while he shares an hourlong recount of his 1993 weeklong trip to Shenzhen.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | July 18, 2013
Could "hope" be the next significant measure of a students' ability to succeed in school? Montgomery County school officials think so. According to a Washington Post story published Wednesday, the school district will be polling students in September on everything from whether they “laughed or smiled a lot yesterday” to whether they “have a best friend at school.” The county is working with Gallup to survey students about the...
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Rarely does a literary classic transfer from page to stage as eloquently as Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" does in the current production by the Annapolis Shakespeare Company at Bowie Playhouse. Everything works beautifully, beginning with Jon Jory's engaging stage adaptation, which is faithful to Austen's prose and yet holds its relevance to contemporary audiences. Sally Boyett-D'Angelo's smart direction of the dream cast she has assembled creates exciting theater, where every actor fully delivers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
Dr. Richard R. Rubin, a Johns Hopkins psychologist who counseled children and adults on how to cope with the emotional effects of diabetes, died of complications from prostate cancer March 25 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Monkton resident was 69. Born in Lima, Peru, he was the son of Goldie Rubin and Morton Rubin, a scientist who worked in meteorology in South America, Antarctica and South Africa. He lived with his parents in Pretoria, South Africa, and was a 1961 graduate of Walter Johnson High School in Bethesda.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 11, 1993
Probably nothing short of the second coming of David Letterman could live up to the hype and expectations drummed up for "And the Band Played On," the 2 1/2 -hour HBO film based on Randy Shilts' controversial best seller about AIDS.Due to the subject matter and the fact that the film has 10 times as many big-name stars as your average feature film, "And the Band Played On," which debuts tonight at 8, has been billed as the TV event of the year.L In terms of a second coming, it's a bit of a disappointment.
NEWS
By FEDERAL NEWS SERVICECOX NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 1997
ARLINGTON, Va. -- The definition emblazoned by the doorway informs visitors to the Newseum that news is "1. A report of recent events, especially unusual or notable ones."This report concerns such an event: The world's first interactive museum of news and the newest attraction in metropolitan Washington, opened Friday across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial.Vice President Al Gore was on hand for opening day festivities and President Clinton telephoned his good wishes."We are here to celebrate the press," Gore said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Robert W. Cos, a crane equipment safety consultant who raised awareness in the 1980s of the unsafe car practice called "clipping," died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Canton resident was 65. Robert William Cos, whose parents owned John's Lunch on Pier 7, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Montford Avenue in Canton. After graduating from Patterson High School in 1964, he enlisted in the Marine Corps the next year. He served in Vietnam during the war and had attained the rank of sergeant at the time of his 1969 discharge.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
After petitions sent three Maryland laws to voters this fall - the first such referendums in 20 years - state leaders said Tuesday that the process designed in the era before electronic signatures needs a fresh look. "Our forefathers never imagined everything that we did in Annapolis would be subject to referendum," Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said. Opponents of same-sex marriage, the Dream Act that granted in-state tuition to some illegal immigrants and the redrawn congressional boundaries harnessed the petition process, gathering enough signatures to place each law on the November ballot.
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