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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
Q. I was amazed to read in one of your articles that aspartame can provide pain relief. You also said it prolongs bleeding time and might lower a fever. I asked my doctor about this, and he looked at me in disbelief. Then I contacted the makers of $H NutraSweet and they responded that their product is very safe.I bruise easily and worry that aspartame in my diet sodas may be affecting my blood. Where can I find the research you talked about?A. The study demonstrating that aspartame can prolong bleeding time was published in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (May 1998; pp. 580)
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | June 14, 2007
I have read that aluminum seems to be associated with Alzheimer's disease. Could the aluminum in antiperspirants increase the risk? What else can you use to reduce underarm sweating and odor? The aluminum/Alzheimer's connection has been debated for decades. Although there is no definitive proof, scientists have linked elevated levels of aluminum to the development of dementia (Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, May). It is not clear whether enough aluminum is absorbed from antiperspirants to pose a problem.
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By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | June 25, 1991
Larry Taylor's mysterious seizures, hives, headaches and blurred vision eluded medical explanation for nearly three years. He lost his job. He had to quit driving.In 1986, at his doctor's suggestion, the Arlington, Texas, man stopped drinking his normal six diet soft drinks a day. "From that day forward I never had another visual disturbance, headache, seizure or anything again," he said.Mr. Taylor blames his problems on aspartame, the decade-old artificial sweetener that Monsanto Co. markets under the brand names NutraSweet and Equal.
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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
My wife has recently developed diabetes and watches her sugar intake carefully. She uses Equal to sweeten her coffee or iced tea. We read that Equal might be helpful against arthritis pain, but her doctor has never heard of this. He prescribed Vioxx, but it is too expensive. Aspirin and ibuprofen are cheap, but they give her heartburn. Is it true that Equal might work? If so, how much does it take? Research published in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (May 1998) showed that aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2004
My wife has recently developed diabetes and watches her sugar intake carefully. She uses Equal to sweeten her coffee or iced tea. We read that Equal might be helpful against arthritis pain, but her doctor has never heard of this. He prescribed Vioxx, but it is too expensive. Aspirin and ibuprofen are cheap, but they give her heartburn. Is it true that Equal might work? If so, how much does it take? Research published in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (May 1998) showed that aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet)
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: My son is hyperactive and a friend suggested that this can be caused by an allergy to aspartame. We do let him drink a lot of diet soda so I wonder if he should be tested.A: Many parents of hyperactive children (the term doctors now tend to use is attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity) wonder whether additives in food could be responsible for their children's condition. To date, however, scientists have not been able to establish any clear-cut relationship between these additives and the observed behavior.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun King Features Syndicate | June 21, 1998
Q.I have noticed that my joints hurt less when I am using aspartame. At first I thought it was just a coincidence, but I am now convinced that Equal relieves my arthritis.A.Aspartame (Equal) appears to have analgesic activity. A report in May's Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics demonstrated significant relief from arthritis pain with aspartame compared to placebo. Researchers gave arthritis sufferers either four or eight tablets (totaling 76 or 152 milligrams) of the sweetener.Aspartame appears to have some aspirin-like effects on bleeding and fever as well.
FEATURES
By King Features Syndicate | May 17, 1998
Q.I read your article on mixing grape juice with Certo for arthritis. It worked for me. I learned about this home remedy back in the 1970s from my mother-in-law. At that time my knee was swollen double even after taking Motrin and Clinoril, so I tried the grape juice and Certo. The knee returned to normal size within a month. I took one tablespoon of Certo in 8 ounces of unsweetened grape juice once a day. I still use this treatment if and when the occasion arises.A.We had no idea the Certo and grape juice remedy went back so far. Certo is used to thicken homemade jams and jellies and is found in the canning section of the supermarket.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 1998
Q.I read with interest a note in a recent column of yours from a person with a serious constipation problem (over two weeks). A year ago I had a similar problem and tried everything including Metamucil, Ex-Lax, milk of magnesia and a Fleet enema with no results. A visit to the doctor resulted in a prescription but still no relief.Then I remembered: Prunes are a laxative. I bought some prune juice with pulp and drank 4 ounces a day with plenty of water. Within a few days I got back to normal.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | September 24, 1991
At a dinner party recently, we played "What ever happened to . . ." regarding nutrition issues that had been really hot in the past, but seem to have vanished without resolution.Sweeteners were of particular interest to the group, since all have young children.Here are some formerly burning issues raised by consumer groups, and their scientific resolutions.Everybody knows that sugar causes hyperactivityWrong.The sugar issue was raised in the days of the Feingold Diet, when we believed sugar made kids hyperactive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken McAlpine and Ken McAlpine,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2001
Certainly the Internet is a terrific source of information, but so is Mrs. McGinty's Tuesday morning bridge club. In just a few hours of surfing, staffers at the Federal Trade Commission found 1,200 Web sites that offered questionable medical advice. Had they focused their navigating on nutrition information, their travels might have been even more enlivening. Type "aspartame" into that humming search engine and, after coming up for air, you will learn that the pervasive low-calorie sweetener is: A. Safe for the general public, including diabetics, pregnant and nursing women, and children.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
Q. I was amazed to read in one of your articles that aspartame can provide pain relief. You also said it prolongs bleeding time and might lower a fever. I asked my doctor about this, and he looked at me in disbelief. Then I contacted the makers of $H NutraSweet and they responded that their product is very safe.I bruise easily and worry that aspartame in my diet sodas may be affecting my blood. Where can I find the research you talked about?A. The study demonstrating that aspartame can prolong bleeding time was published in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics (May 1998; pp. 580)
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 1998
Q.Last year my granddaughter caught lice at school. I read about using petroleum jelly and told my daughter about it. Well, the whole family tried it together. What a nightmare! Nothing will wash it out!I called the 800 number on the jar, and someone told me they had had a rash of calls because of the article in the paper. The whole family had to go to work and school with petroleum jelly in their hair.I felt awful, because I was the one who told them about your article.A.Guilty as charged.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 1998
Q.I read with interest a note in a recent column of yours from a person with a serious constipation problem (over two weeks). A year ago I had a similar problem and tried everything including Metamucil, Ex-Lax, milk of magnesia and a Fleet enema with no results. A visit to the doctor resulted in a prescription but still no relief.Then I remembered: Prunes are a laxative. I bought some prune juice with pulp and drank 4 ounces a day with plenty of water. Within a few days I got back to normal.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun King Features Syndicate | June 21, 1998
Q.I have noticed that my joints hurt less when I am using aspartame. At first I thought it was just a coincidence, but I am now convinced that Equal relieves my arthritis.A.Aspartame (Equal) appears to have analgesic activity. A report in May's Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics demonstrated significant relief from arthritis pain with aspartame compared to placebo. Researchers gave arthritis sufferers either four or eight tablets (totaling 76 or 152 milligrams) of the sweetener.Aspartame appears to have some aspirin-like effects on bleeding and fever as well.
FEATURES
By King Features Syndicate | May 17, 1998
Q.I read your article on mixing grape juice with Certo for arthritis. It worked for me. I learned about this home remedy back in the 1970s from my mother-in-law. At that time my knee was swollen double even after taking Motrin and Clinoril, so I tried the grape juice and Certo. The knee returned to normal size within a month. I took one tablespoon of Certo in 8 ounces of unsweetened grape juice once a day. I still use this treatment if and when the occasion arises.A.We had no idea the Certo and grape juice remedy went back so far. Certo is used to thicken homemade jams and jellies and is found in the canning section of the supermarket.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | June 14, 2007
I have read that aluminum seems to be associated with Alzheimer's disease. Could the aluminum in antiperspirants increase the risk? What else can you use to reduce underarm sweating and odor? The aluminum/Alzheimer's connection has been debated for decades. Although there is no definitive proof, scientists have linked elevated levels of aluminum to the development of dementia (Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, May). It is not clear whether enough aluminum is absorbed from antiperspirants to pose a problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken McAlpine and Ken McAlpine,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2001
Certainly the Internet is a terrific source of information, but so is Mrs. McGinty's Tuesday morning bridge club. In just a few hours of surfing, staffers at the Federal Trade Commission found 1,200 Web sites that offered questionable medical advice. Had they focused their navigating on nutrition information, their travels might have been even more enlivening. Type "aspartame" into that humming search engine and, after coming up for air, you will learn that the pervasive low-calorie sweetener is: A. Safe for the general public, including diabetics, pregnant and nursing women, and children.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1994
Q: My son is hyperactive and a friend suggested that this can be caused by an allergy to aspartame. We do let him drink a lot of diet soda so I wonder if he should be tested.A: Many parents of hyperactive children (the term doctors now tend to use is attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity) wonder whether additives in food could be responsible for their children's condition. To date, however, scientists have not been able to establish any clear-cut relationship between these additives and the observed behavior.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | September 24, 1991
At a dinner party recently, we played "What ever happened to . . ." regarding nutrition issues that had been really hot in the past, but seem to have vanished without resolution.Sweeteners were of particular interest to the group, since all have young children.Here are some formerly burning issues raised by consumer groups, and their scientific resolutions.Everybody knows that sugar causes hyperactivityWrong.The sugar issue was raised in the days of the Feingold Diet, when we believed sugar made kids hyperactive.
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