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By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
The forecast for today's 105th annual Grand National Steeplechase in Butler is considerably brighter than last year's. The rain that fell on last year's race is not on the radar. The Maryland Amateur Timber Association, with a sponsorship from Union Memorial Hospital, has spiced the proceedings with a $30,000 bonus to the owner if a horse wins both today's Grand National and next Saturday's Maryland Hunt Cup. "The goal is to link the Grand National and Hunt Cup," said Peter Fenwick, secretary to Maryland Steeplechasing.
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By Kent Baker, For The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
The day couldn't have turned out better for owner Irv Naylor. And it wasn't too shabby for jockey James Slater, either. With Slater in the saddle, Naylor's Alfa Beat captured the 111th running of the Grand National Steeplechase in Butler, adding a punctuation mark to a four-win performance at the Middleburg (Va.) Spring Races that shot Naylor into the national lead among owners in purses won. All four Naylor horses who prevailed in Virginia were trained by Slater's wife, Brianne.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
Trainer Tom Voss' winning streak at My Lady's Manor ended at four yesterday. Sam Sullivan, the defending champion trained by Voss, provided his customary honest effort, but it was New Zealand-bred Askim who survived a three-sided battle down the stretch to win the 94th running under sunny skies in Monkton. Formerly a rider at the state's flat tracks, Charlie Fenwick III out-dueled two female rivals down the lane to prevail over Joe At Six with Sam Sullivan finishing an additional stride back in third.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
A decade ago, Irv Naylor fell off his mount during a timber race and broke his neck. He has not walked since. Naylor could have quit the sport. Instead, the one-time jockey became an owner, twice winning the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. Saturday, Naylor will watch the 113th running of the race in Glyndon and root hard for his horse, Askim. A victory would give Naylor the Challenge Cup, a 2-foot silver trophy awarded to an owner with three Hunt Cup victories. That has not been done since 1983.
SPORTS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 29, 2008
Because of an editing error, Sunday's article on the Maryland Hunt Cup ended in the middle of a sentence. Here is the complete article. There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. On Saturday, in the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 24, 2009
A decade ago, Irv Naylor fell off his mount during a timber race and broke his neck. He has not walked since. Naylor could have quit the sport. Instead, the one-time jockey became an owner, twice winning the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. Saturday, Naylor will watch the 113th running of the race in Glyndon and root hard for his horse, Askim. A victory would give Naylor the Challenge Cup, a 2-foot silver trophy awarded to an owner with three Hunt Cup victories. That has not been done since 1983.
SPORTS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2008
There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. Yesterday at the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500. All those years of training with his parents paid off as Fenwick and his mount, Askim, who is trained by Stewart, held off a late surge by Coal Dust and won the race by a length.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 20, 2008
Others owned the credentials, but it was Private Attack who owned the course during the 106th running of the Grand National steeplechase yesterday in Butler. Lightly regarded in the field of eight and without a previous victory in a sanctioned race, the 9-year-old gelding carried 58-year-old rider Billy Santoro to an impressive score over two previous Grand National winners, Askim and Bubble Economy, as well as the highly regarded Coal Dust. Askim finished second, Bubble Economy third and Coal Dust fifth in the $35,000 race.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
His great-grandfather, Redmond Stewart, was one of the founders of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. His grandfather built the property on which today's 104th Grand National Steeplechase will be conducted. His father, Charlie Fenwick Jr., has been a prominent rider and trainer in jumping circles for decades. So, steeplechasing is clearly ingrained in the blood of Charlie Fenwick III, who is scheduled to ride Askim while defending the jockey title in today's feature at Butler. The younger Fenwick will be aboard for his mother, Ann D. Stewart, who trains Askim, and competing against his father, who trains Make Your Own, during the 3 1/4 -mile test over timber fences that will be the final tuneup for the Hunt Cup next weekend.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, For The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
The day couldn't have turned out better for owner Irv Naylor. And it wasn't too shabby for jockey James Slater, either. With Slater in the saddle, Naylor's Alfa Beat captured the 111th running of the Grand National Steeplechase in Butler, adding a punctuation mark to a four-win performance at the Middleburg (Va.) Spring Races that shot Naylor into the national lead among owners in purses won. All four Naylor horses who prevailed in Virginia were trained by Slater's wife, Brianne.
SPORTS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 29, 2008
Because of an editing error, Sunday's article on the Maryland Hunt Cup ended in the middle of a sentence. Here is the complete article. There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. On Saturday, in the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500.
SPORTS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2008
There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. Yesterday at the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500. All those years of training with his parents paid off as Fenwick and his mount, Askim, who is trained by Stewart, held off a late surge by Coal Dust and won the race by a length.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 20, 2008
Others owned the credentials, but it was Private Attack who owned the course during the 106th running of the Grand National steeplechase yesterday in Butler. Lightly regarded in the field of eight and without a previous victory in a sanctioned race, the 9-year-old gelding carried 58-year-old rider Billy Santoro to an impressive score over two previous Grand National winners, Askim and Bubble Economy, as well as the highly regarded Coal Dust. Askim finished second, Bubble Economy third and Coal Dust fifth in the $35,000 race.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 19, 2008
When Coal Dust was a youngster of 3, flat trainer Jimmy Murphy recommended that he be shifted to jumping, an unusual suggestion for a horse of that age. He even thought the horse could someday win the Maryland Hunt Cup. "Jimmy rode jumpers, so he knows what they look like," said Thomas Voss, who accepted his friend's view and converted Coal Dust into a steeplechaser. "On the flat, the horse was just a big, old rambling thing, and Jimmy thought he could be a pretty good timber horse. He did me a favor."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
The forecast for today's 105th annual Grand National Steeplechase in Butler is considerably brighter than last year's. The rain that fell on last year's race is not on the radar. The Maryland Amateur Timber Association, with a sponsorship from Union Memorial Hospital, has spiced the proceedings with a $30,000 bonus to the owner if a horse wins both today's Grand National and next Saturday's Maryland Hunt Cup. "The goal is to link the Grand National and Hunt Cup," said Peter Fenwick, secretary to Maryland Steeplechasing.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
On a miserable, rainy day in Butler, jockey Charles Fenwick III, trainer Ann D. Stewart and owner Irv Naylor left the 104th running of the Grand National Steeplechase with the sunniest dispositions. That trio combined to send out Askim to win the $30,000 feature in come-from-behind fashion before a crowd noticeably thinned by the weather. The New Zealand-born import prevailed by a comfortable margin over Sky And Sea, who set a leisurely pace after the early front-runner, Salmo, refused the water jump and sent rider Roger Horgan flying over the fence alone midway through the race.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
On a miserable, rainy day in Butler, jockey Charles Fenwick III, trainer Ann D. Stewart and owner Irv Naylor left the 104th running of the Grand National Steeplechase with the sunniest dispositions. That trio combined to send out Askim to win the $30,000 feature in come-from-behind fashion before a crowd noticeably thinned by the weather. The New Zealand-born import prevailed by a comfortable margin over Sky And Sea, who set a leisurely pace after the early front-runner, Salmo, refused the water jump and sent rider Roger Horgan flying over the fence alone midway through the race.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 19, 2008
When Coal Dust was a youngster of 3, flat trainer Jimmy Murphy recommended that he be shifted to jumping, an unusual suggestion for a horse of that age. He even thought the horse could someday win the Maryland Hunt Cup. "Jimmy rode jumpers, so he knows what they look like," said Thomas Voss, who accepted his friend's view and converted Coal Dust into a steeplechaser. "On the flat, the horse was just a big, old rambling thing, and Jimmy thought he could be a pretty good timber horse. He did me a favor."
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
His great-grandfather, Redmond Stewart, was one of the founders of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup. His grandfather built the property on which today's 104th Grand National Steeplechase will be conducted. His father, Charlie Fenwick Jr., has been a prominent rider and trainer in jumping circles for decades. So, steeplechasing is clearly ingrained in the blood of Charlie Fenwick III, who is scheduled to ride Askim while defending the jockey title in today's feature at Butler. The younger Fenwick will be aboard for his mother, Ann D. Stewart, who trains Askim, and competing against his father, who trains Make Your Own, during the 3 1/4 -mile test over timber fences that will be the final tuneup for the Hunt Cup next weekend.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
Trainer Tom Voss' winning streak at My Lady's Manor ended at four yesterday. Sam Sullivan, the defending champion trained by Voss, provided his customary honest effort, but it was New Zealand-bred Askim who survived a three-sided battle down the stretch to win the 94th running under sunny skies in Monkton. Formerly a rider at the state's flat tracks, Charlie Fenwick III out-dueled two female rivals down the lane to prevail over Joe At Six with Sam Sullivan finishing an additional stride back in third.
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