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Asian Pears

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NEWS
February 14, 1999
Q. I love Asian pears and was told that they do grow in Maryland. Would they work in a backyard garden?A. Yes, they will. There's no need to pay $3 per pound for those luscious fruits when you can grow them at home. The Asian pear makes a handsome, long-lived tree that will usually produce a lot of fruit, with little or no spraying for insects and diseases.It's very hard to find good dwarfing rootstocks for Asian pears, so you will have to prune every year to maintain the desired shape and size.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 6, 2011
This time of year school and work lunchboxes can provide a plethora of healthy local fruit that will please even the most meticulous food Nazi. Apples come to mind, but so do pears, which are readily available at the supermarket. There are almost as many varieties of pears as there are of apples, but we usually see only a few of them around here: Bosc, Bartletts, d'anjou, seckel, maybe Asian (aka Nashi) pears. Boscs generally appear later in the season, are tall, lean and have a brownish skin.
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NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
Asian pears -- the large, round, elegantly shaped fruit -- have the fragrance of a fruit tree in full bloom and the flavor of a charming wine from Alsace. What a precious treat. Is it any wonder the pears are displayed like the gems of the produce counter? Choose Asian pears carefully. Look for fruit that is bruise- and blemish-free, with no soft spots. The pear should be firm, but not rock hard. For an easy dessert, thinly slice Asian pears into wedges and serve with roasted walnuts and a glass of dessert wine.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
Asian pears -- the large, round, elegantly shaped fruit -- have the fragrance of a fruit tree in full bloom and the flavor of a charming wine from Alsace. What a precious treat. Is it any wonder the pears are displayed like the gems of the produce counter? Choose Asian pears carefully. Look for fruit that is bruise- and blemish-free, with no soft spots. The pear should be firm, but not rock hard. For an easy dessert, thinly slice Asian pears into wedges and serve with roasted walnuts and a glass of dessert wine.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | October 6, 2011
This time of year school and work lunchboxes can provide a plethora of healthy local fruit that will please even the most meticulous food Nazi. Apples come to mind, but so do pears, which are readily available at the supermarket. There are almost as many varieties of pears as there are of apples, but we usually see only a few of them around here: Bosc, Bartletts, d'anjou, seckel, maybe Asian (aka Nashi) pears. Boscs generally appear later in the season, are tall, lean and have a brownish skin.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Like the Liberty apple, Asian pears show great promise for Maryland homeowners who want to grow backyard fruit with a minimum of pesticides.Familiar varieties of pears -- like Bartlett and Bosc -- require fewer applications of pesticides than do most apples, said Dr. Christopher S. Walsh, fruits specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service University of Maryland System.But Asian pears require even less spraying. Since their attractive, ornamental foliage is not subject to disease pressures, no spraying is required until the trees start bearing.
NEWS
August 29, 1999
Q. I am crazy about Asian pears but I can hardly afford to buy them. Can I grow them in my back yard?A. Yes, Asian pear trees seem to grow well in all parts of Maryland. You'll want to grow at least two different cultivars to ensure good pollination. Hosui and Olympic are two recommended varieties for Maryland.Asian pear trees are vigorous and begin bearing fruit by the third year after planting. They tend to have fewer pest problems than peach or apple trees, but you'll need to prune and practice pest control to have successful harvests.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
We have added a few options to our round-up of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day dining options. Regi's in Federal Hill is open until 11 p.m. on Christmas Eve, offering a $30.18 holiday prix-fixe menu in addidition to its regular menu., and from from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., starting with brunch fare and moving on to big salads and dinner. Ra Sushi is open until 7 p.m. on Christmas Eve and opens at 4 p.m. on Christmas Day. And take a look at what Pazo is doing this year. Instead of the buffet-style Christmas Eve dinner the Harbor East restaurant has offered in the past, Pazo is serving a three-course fixed-price menu with main course options like Creekmore Farms hagner steak, braised pork cheeks and magret (duck breast)
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement | October 13, 2007
When should I pick my pears? Mine get mushy. Also, how do I know when to harvest apples? European pears, the type most commonly grown, should not be allowed to ripen on the tree. They will ripen indoors after picking. Harvest when the pears' background color changes and the fruit snaps easily off the branch. Seckel pears are the exception because they can ripen on the tree, though don't wait until they get too soft. Asian pears ripen like Seckel pears. Pick apples when they reach full size and color, and twist easily off the branch.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
Pity the pear. Somehow it has never achieved the popularity in the United States of that other fall fruit, the apple. Maryland agriculture officials know how many acres of apples are grown in the state, but they don't keep track of the pear crop. The orchards that do grow pears have them in quantities far smaller than apples. Yet this fruit that Homer called the "gift of the gods" brings subtle, fresh flavors to a variety of fall dishes. Poached and drizzled with raspberry coulis, pears make a sensuous and elegant dessert.
NEWS
August 29, 1999
Q. I am crazy about Asian pears but I can hardly afford to buy them. Can I grow them in my back yard?A. Yes, Asian pear trees seem to grow well in all parts of Maryland. You'll want to grow at least two different cultivars to ensure good pollination. Hosui and Olympic are two recommended varieties for Maryland.Asian pear trees are vigorous and begin bearing fruit by the third year after planting. They tend to have fewer pest problems than peach or apple trees, but you'll need to prune and practice pest control to have successful harvests.
NEWS
February 14, 1999
Q. I love Asian pears and was told that they do grow in Maryland. Would they work in a backyard garden?A. Yes, they will. There's no need to pay $3 per pound for those luscious fruits when you can grow them at home. The Asian pear makes a handsome, long-lived tree that will usually produce a lot of fruit, with little or no spraying for insects and diseases.It's very hard to find good dwarfing rootstocks for Asian pears, so you will have to prune every year to maintain the desired shape and size.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Like the Liberty apple, Asian pears show great promise for Maryland homeowners who want to grow backyard fruit with a minimum of pesticides.Familiar varieties of pears -- like Bartlett and Bosc -- require fewer applications of pesticides than do most apples, said Dr. Christopher S. Walsh, fruits specialist for the Cooperative Extension Service University of Maryland System.But Asian pears require even less spraying. Since their attractive, ornamental foliage is not subject to disease pressures, no spraying is required until the trees start bearing.
FEATURES
By Janet Hazen and Janet Hazen,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | October 9, 1996
Few fruits conjure a more clear and distinct image than the pear. With its graceful, voluptuous contour, it is easily one of the most provocative and sensuous fruits in the world.Knowing that a new crop of pears is right around the corner makes the fading of summer bearable. By late September, ruby-violet berry stains are replaced by clear, fragrant pear juice. Unlike showy flamboyant summer fruits that shout summer, pears, in their understated, refined and subtle fashion, discreetly suggest autumn.
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