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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
Four armed, young Asian-American men broke into the townhouse of an Asian-American family in Cockeysville early today, tied up the family members, ransacked the house and took money, jewelry and a videocassette recorder, Baltimore County police say.The robbery is similar to another break-in involving Asian-American victims and robbers in Cockeysville in May, but police investigators are not sure if the two cases are related."
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 12, 2012
In the scramble to make the GOP more diverse, a lot of people are looking at Asian-Americans, whom many believe are a natural constituency for the party. I would love it if Asian-Americans converted en masse to the Republican Party, but the challenge for Republicans is harder than many appreciate. President Barack Obama did spectacularly well with Asian-Americans, garnering nearly three-quarters of their vote. This runs counter to a lot of conventional wisdom on both the left and the right.
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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | July 18, 1992
Four armed, young Asian-American men broke into the town house of an Asian-American family in Cockeysville early yesterday, tied up the family members, ransacked the house and took money, jewelry and a videocassette recorder, Baltimore County police say.The robbery is similar to another break-in involving Asian-American victims and robbers in Cockeysville in May, "The connection is that they're Asian," police spokesman E. Jay Miller said. "Whether they're related, it's hard to say. We're still exploring any possible connections."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
Baltimore Sticky Rice opened last month in the old Friends space in Fells Point. The first Sticky Rice, in Richmond, Va., was opened in 1999 by John Yamashita and Jason Henry. Located near Virginia Commonwealth University, the restaurant's giddy mix of Asian noodle dishes, salads, pub grub and a full sushi bar caught on quickly with the student population. A menu considerate of vegan and vegetarian tastes and appetites also contributed to Sticky Rice's popularity, as did the restaurant's cheeky, rascally atmosphere.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- As a Japanese-American growing up in East Los Angeles, Don Nakanishi dreaded going to school on Dec. 7."Inevitably, some teacher would mention that Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and all the eyes in the class would turn to me," said Mr. Nakanishi, director of the Asian-American Studies Center at the University of California, Los Angeles.He thought that part of his life was over when he enrolled at Yale University, which he believed to be a great center of liberalism and tolerance.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | May 3, 1992
An article in Sunday's Sun should have stated that an Asian-American conference in Arlington, Va., was sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Heritage Council Inc.The Sun regrets the error.ARLINGTON, Va. -- An essential thread linking many of the workshops at the first national conference of Asian-Americans yesterday was the Rodney King trial and its aftermath.The issues up for discussion -- the "glass ceiling" above which minorities do not rise, career development, Japan-bashing, the 1990 census and its consequences -- were overshadowed by a sense of injustice at the King verdict and an awareness that the violence could have erupted close to home.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
Just in for the hip Asian-American man is the new magazine XO, touted as the first national publication targeted at a readership often perceived as industrious, servile and square.Varying parts Men's Health, Scientific American, Playboy and Omni, the first issue of the California-based magazine includes articles such as "Are Men Obsolete?" (a lengthy essay about women's empowerment fueling "a needless war between the sexes") and "Japan's Last Chance" (about the change required for the country to remain an economic powerhouse)
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Special to The Sun | June 17, 1991
SAN FRANCISCO -- History is made in moments large and small, and Tom Hsieh, the first Asian-American to campaign seriously for mayor of a major U.S. city, is having several small moments here at the Old Timers Club.The men at the club are Irish and Italian, most of them retired, all of them former baseball players, many of them also former firefighters. Mr. Hsieh, running for mayor of San Francisco, is an elegant man with a bow tie, a Chinese accent and a name pronounced "Shay."He gives Al Salido a quick slap on the back.
FEATURES
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
You're starring in a movie that's being hailed as the most important Asian-American film in a decade. It opened last week in big cities such as Los Angeles and New York and earned stellar reviews. Better yet, it earned good box-office receipts, mainly because of an underground marketing campaign focused on Asian-Americans. Hoping to capitalize on that success, you visit as many colleges as you can, including the Johns Hopkins University, urging students to see the movie because it will open doors and keep Asian-American actors from being pigeonholed into playing, say, bulletproof monks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | July 3, 2000
Checking Asian-American Web sites isn't just a hobby for Nelson Wong, it's "a passion." Wong spends about 20 hours a week surfing sites that are produced by or for the most wired ethnic group in the United States: Asian-Americans. On his site, AArising.com, probably the oldest of them all, Wong has posted links to about 2,500 sites. They range from "blogs" - a new Net term for personal e-zines, or "Web logs," that offer comment on everything from TV shows to cars to love - to the high-profile commercial venture aOnline.
NEWS
By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2010
This summer, Rosa Park fulfilled a lifelong dream to become a police officer, and in doing so, became the first Asian woman on the Baltimore County force. Park, 27, a native of Cockeysville, said she first became aware of the need for more diversity in the field when she was a teenager and her parents owned a number of liquor stores in Baltimore City. One of the stores was robbed, but when her parents called the police, they felt little was done to find the perpetrator. Park believed her parents were brushed off because their English wasn't very good.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | November 20, 2008
New York Yankees right-hander Mike Mussina is retiring, multiple media outlets reported yesterday. Mussina will make his decision official later this week, according to FoxSports.com, which cited unidentified major league baseball sources and was the first to report the retirement. ESPN.com, citing an unidentified baseball source, also reported that Mussina has decided to retire. Mussina, a former Orioles star who turns 40 on Dec. 8, is coming off the first 20-win season of his 18-year career.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 15, 2008
Calvin Chin, a veteran Chinese community leader and retired tax assessor and restaurant co-owner, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Guilford resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Paca Street, he was the son of Chin Quon and Lee Young Ho, who were early Chinese settlers in Baltimore. As a young man, he worked in the family business, the old China Clipper Restaurant at Charles and Eager streets. He also assisted in other family enterprises, the China Tea Import Co. on Park Avenue and the old Palais D'or, a West Lexington street restaurant.
NEWS
By Stephanie Tracy and Stephanie Tracy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 30, 2003
Melanie Lo went to high school in Alabama and had trouble finding many people who could identify with her experiences as an Asian-American. Now a student at the University of Maryland, College Park, she had to adjust to living farther north, and to being part of a larger Asian-American community, something she did not have in high school. "I always felt like the outsider looking into all these other cultures," Lo said. "Coming here to Maryland, I found a lot of different organizations and finally felt like I was part of a community."
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2003
Asian-Americans, long known for their soaring math scores, are cheering the fact that they are finally above average verbally. This is the first year Asian-Americans collectively scored above average, according to the College Board, which oversees the SATs, the college entrance exams. Even though the group's national average score of 508 was only one point above the mean for college-bound students, some say it's a landmark because it debunks the stereotype that all Asian-Americans are math whizzes and proves that the group has the language skills to fully integrate into mainstream America.
FEATURES
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2003
Better Luck Tomorrow, the highly touted independent film featuring an all Asian-American cast, did brisk business in its second weekend, according to industry estimates. The film, which opened in Baltimore last weekend after premiering in big cities like Los Angeles and New York on April 11, grossed an estimated $515,000, according to Paramount Classics, which is distributing the movie with MTV Films. Some worried that the film, which centers on a group of Asian-Americans in Orange County, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 23, 2000
As someone who's played with Barbies all my life -- well, actually, I stopped when I turned 23 -- I was thrilled to learn about the popular doll's latest incarnation, Barbie for President 2000. Toymaker Mattel Inc. launched the doll in April to show girls across America that they can aim for a position in the White House, and not just as first lady -- or intern. To prove that point, the new Barbie is spiffily dressed in a sharp blue business suit that says "I know the meanings of budget deficit and nuclear weapons!"
NEWS
By EMIL GUILLERMO | January 5, 1997
THE WITCH HUNT is on.If you gave money to the Democratic National Committee last year, and you happen to be an Asian-American, you'd better have a good reason.Saying that you believe in the American system, apple pie as well as kimchi, doesn't cut it.Saying that you just wanted to support your favorite candidate, felt a mad compulsion toward civic involvement and had a little extra cash won't save your butt this time.You're an Asian-American in the era of John Huang, James Riady and the Lippo Group.
FEATURES
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2003
You're starring in a movie that's being hailed as the most important Asian-American film in a decade. It opened last week in big cities such as Los Angeles and New York and earned stellar reviews. Better yet, it earned good box-office receipts, mainly because of an underground marketing campaign focused on Asian-Americans. Hoping to capitalize on that success, you visit as many colleges as you can, including the Johns Hopkins University, urging students to see the movie because it will open doors and keep Asian-American actors from being pigeonholed into playing, say, bulletproof monks.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - Asian-American lawyers have taken a strong stand on university affirmative action in the case to be heard by the Supreme Court this week - and on opposite sides of the issue. Based in Northern California, the Asian American Legal Foundation agrees with the white plaintiffs and urges the court to end race-based admissions policies. "The Constitution protects individuals, and individuals should not be judged on their race," says Alan Tse, a San Francisco lawyer. But National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium, a coalition of 25 Asian civil rights groups, sides with the University of Michigan and urges the court to preserve affirmative action.
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