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Asiago Cheese

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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2009
While visiting Baltimore in 2003, Patti Kress from Osprey Fla., had an incredibly good cheese spread that she purchased at a cheese stand at the Cross Street Market. She thinks it contained asiago cheese, cream cheese and chives. Since she doesn't get to Baltimore often, she was hoping to find a recipe for the spread so she could re-create it at home. Tracy Morgan from Santa Rosa, Calif., says she came up with a delicious cheese spread that sounds very close to what Kress described. The spread is very simple to make and reminded me of a homemade Boursin cheese.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
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NEWS
November 13, 2005
Barry Fleischmann, executive chef and owner of Innovative Gourmet in Owings Mills, offers this recipe for meatballs that can be used as an appetizer or entree. Lamb and Roasted Garlic Meatballs With Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Asiago Cheese Makes 8 servings if used as an appetizer, 4 servings if used as an entree 2 pounds ground lamb 3 ounces chopped sun-dried tomatoes 2 ounces roasted garlic cloves, pureed 1/4 pound shredded Asiago cheese, plus more for garnish 1/2 pound day-old small bread cubes 2 eggs salt to taste pepper to taste 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley olive oil, to saute Roasted Onion Tomato Sauce (recipe below)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Open only since last month, Luigi's Italian Deli in Hampden avoids any of the missteps that invariably are part of a new restaurant. Luigi's, and several of the small restaurants on 36th Street in Hampden, aka The Avenue, belie the old adage that patrons are reluctant to walk up stairs to a restaurant. At the top of these steps is a pleasant porch furnished with four tiny tables. Sipping a Blood Orange Pellegrino and tackling one of the specialty sandwiches makes scaling a few steps a small price to pay. There is also a spacious patio out back.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, for The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Steaming, boiling and stir frying are the go-to cooking methods for broccoli, but oven roasting produces a much better result. Roasting broccoli brings out the muscle in the veggie by condensing the flavor and giving it crispy little browned spots packed full of flavor. This recipe is the missionary that will convert the holdouts from childhood who never became fans of these crunchy cruciferae. The trick to this recipe is keeping the broccoli dry. Wet broccoli will steam, so if it's not visibly dirty, skip washing it or wash and meticulously dry it. The garlic paste in the vinaigrette is slightly cooked by the hot broccoli, softening its bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
FOOD snobs often turn up their noses at the prospect of going to a chain restaurant, dismissing such a place as nothing more than a food factory for hungry hoi polloi. In doing so, they're failing to acknowledge the beauty of a decent chain, and that is the consistent comfort zone it creates. For example, you're alone, you're in a strange place and you're hungry. In such a situation, the restaurant you're familiar with looks mighty appealing. A good chain to get familiar with is Panera Bread, a St. Louis company that used to be affiliated with Au Bon Pain.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
There's a new restaurant in town - at least, that's what Mike Strati, manager of Blue Pointe Grille, wants everyone to think. The former Hunter's Lodge restaurant closed during the summer to reopen recently as Blue Pointe Grill. "We absolutely redid everything, rethought everything we were doing," Strati says. "We changed the appearance of the place, inside and out, and brought our prices down so that anyone can go there anytime." Changes to the menu, Strati says, include a new emphasis on seafood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Open only since last month, Luigi's Italian Deli in Hampden avoids any of the missteps that invariably are part of a new restaurant. Luigi's, and several of the small restaurants on 36th Street in Hampden, aka The Avenue, belie the old adage that patrons are reluctant to walk up stairs to a restaurant. At the top of these steps is a pleasant porch furnished with four tiny tables. Sipping a Blood Orange Pellegrino and tackling one of the specialty sandwiches makes scaling a few steps a small price to pay. There is also a spacious patio out back.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
It's the holiday season, your house has been turned into Grand Central Station with guests dropping by at all hours. You need to whip up food in a flash. What to do? First, don't panic. Next, check your pantry and fridge. Believe it or not, you probably have the makings of some fabulous appetizers already in-house. Ritz crackers and Cheez Whiz are only for desperate scenarios, and that's not the situation you'll be in if you follow the advice of these local party pros. "There's nothing here that even the most inexperienced cook, just out of college or just married, can't do," says Harriet Dopkin, president and co-owner of the Classic Catering People in Owings Mills.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 24, 1997
Cleaning up image of chocolate milkAmerica's trendiest kid, Jonathan Lipnicki of "Jerry McGuire" fame, will soon be sporting the first chocolate milk mustache, part of a new campaign by the National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Board to restore chocolate milk's somewhat tarnished image. Studies have found that low-fat or fat-free chocolate milk is as nutritious as unflavored milk -- an excellent source of calcium and other important vitamins and minerals. It also has less sugar than cola.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2009
While visiting Baltimore in 2003, Patti Kress from Osprey Fla., had an incredibly good cheese spread that she purchased at a cheese stand at the Cross Street Market. She thinks it contained asiago cheese, cream cheese and chives. Since she doesn't get to Baltimore often, she was hoping to find a recipe for the spread so she could re-create it at home. Tracy Morgan from Santa Rosa, Calif., says she came up with a delicious cheese spread that sounds very close to what Kress described. The spread is very simple to make and reminded me of a homemade Boursin cheese.
NEWS
November 13, 2005
Barry Fleischmann, executive chef and owner of Innovative Gourmet in Owings Mills, offers this recipe for meatballs that can be used as an appetizer or entree. Lamb and Roasted Garlic Meatballs With Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Asiago Cheese Makes 8 servings if used as an appetizer, 4 servings if used as an entree 2 pounds ground lamb 3 ounces chopped sun-dried tomatoes 2 ounces roasted garlic cloves, pureed 1/4 pound shredded Asiago cheese, plus more for garnish 1/2 pound day-old small bread cubes 2 eggs salt to taste pepper to taste 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley olive oil, to saute Roasted Onion Tomato Sauce (recipe below)
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
It's the holiday season, your house has been turned into Grand Central Station with guests dropping by at all hours. You need to whip up food in a flash. What to do? First, don't panic. Next, check your pantry and fridge. Believe it or not, you probably have the makings of some fabulous appetizers already in-house. Ritz crackers and Cheez Whiz are only for desperate scenarios, and that's not the situation you'll be in if you follow the advice of these local party pros. "There's nothing here that even the most inexperienced cook, just out of college or just married, can't do," says Harriet Dopkin, president and co-owner of the Classic Catering People in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 25, 2001
There's a new restaurant in town - at least, that's what Mike Strati, manager of Blue Pointe Grille, wants everyone to think. The former Hunter's Lodge restaurant closed during the summer to reopen recently as Blue Pointe Grill. "We absolutely redid everything, rethought everything we were doing," Strati says. "We changed the appearance of the place, inside and out, and brought our prices down so that anyone can go there anytime." Changes to the menu, Strati says, include a new emphasis on seafood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
FOOD snobs often turn up their noses at the prospect of going to a chain restaurant, dismissing such a place as nothing more than a food factory for hungry hoi polloi. In doing so, they're failing to acknowledge the beauty of a decent chain, and that is the consistent comfort zone it creates. For example, you're alone, you're in a strange place and you're hungry. In such a situation, the restaurant you're familiar with looks mighty appealing. A good chain to get familiar with is Panera Bread, a St. Louis company that used to be affiliated with Au Bon Pain.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 10, 1998
* Item: Monterey Pasta Co. Refrigerator Case Pastas and Sauces* What you get: 9 ounces pasta, 15 ounces sauce* Cost: $2.19 to $3.99* Preparation time: 6 to 9 minutes* Review: California-based Monterey offers its own nouvelle spin on refrigerated pastas and sauces. The Sweet Tomato Basil Sauce, for instance, is seasoned with honey and Burgundy wine. The tangy, chunky sauce complimented the two pastas we tried: Garlic Basil Fettuccine and Sun Dried Tomato & Asiago Cheese Tortelloni in Tomato Basil Pasta.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | December 31, 1997
* Item: Elite Foods Polenta* Servings per package: 4* Cost: $3.19* Preparation time: 10 to 15 minutes* Review: If you're ready to broaden your culinary horizons, try polenta -- an Italian side dish made from cornmeal mush. Preparation of this product couldn't be simpler. Refrigerated plastic-sealed tubes allow you to slice the stuff, then bake, grill or fry it in olive oil or butter. Despite the chanterelle, shiitake, porcini and oyster mushrooms in the wild mushroom polenta, I found it lackluster when served plain.
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