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By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2006
Walking up the dusty Hollywood canyon in 100-degree heat, inhaling great gulps of smog, I begin to wonder if I'm being punk'd. It's not that I'm famous or anything, it's just that my hiking partner is Ashton Kutcher, who created the MTV show where people are subjected to elaborate, ego-puncturing practical jokes -- they're punk'd. He's also well known for starring as the dumb brunet on That '70s Show, headlining such cinematic milestones as Dude, Where's My Car?, and marrying Demi Moore, who happens to be 15 years his senior.
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August 12, 2013
Breaking Bad is in its last season, Ashton Kutcher is old and British subjects are being pushed into "Minority Report" territory. Welcome to your online trends report for August 12, 2013. Trending now What: Breaking Bad, AMC Where: Google search, Twitter Why: "Breaking Bad," on AMC, is one of the most successful TV shows in recent memory. Sony Pictures Television grows worldwide, expanding channels into 840 million households. The man behind it all? A certain former John Carroll janitor, now at the helm of one of the biggest television studios in Hollywood.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 29, 2006
The Guardian is that rarest of cinematic commodities: an action movie displaying brains and heart and the opportunity for its stars to do something more than keep the narrative flowing between explosions. Perhaps that should come as no surprise, as it was directed by Andrew Davis, whose 1993 The Fugitive remains a high-water mark for modern action-adventure flicks. It's also one of the few in which the acting - especially Tommy Lee Jones' Oscar-winning turn as a no-nonsense U.S. marshal - was as lauded as the action.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
What Happens in Vegas is the kind of terrible mistake performers as big as Cameron Diaz and Ashton Kutcher usually make at the beginning of their careers, when they're anxious to break into the movies, or at the end, when they're struggling for a comeback. It's a screwed-up screwball farce about a slacker (Kutcher) and a go-getter (Diaz) who meet and get married one drunken night in Las Vegas. They win a $3 million jackpot with her quarter and his pull on a one-armed bandit and are sentenced to "six months hard marriage" when they try to get an annulment and sue each other for the money.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2005
Guess Who plays out the shock of a beautiful black daughter (Zoe Saldana) introducing her white fiance (Ashton Kutcher) to her formidable parents (Bernie Mac and Judith Scott) with grace and humanity, whether addressing the racial content or transcending it. Oh, it's full of stunned looks and dueling stereotypes, and the most daring, hilarious scene comes when Mac demands that Kutcher repeat some black jokes that the boy has heard around his family's dinner table. But the movie's sweetness, wit and charm go beyond its can't-we-all-just-get-along premise.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2013
Breaking Bad is in its last season, Ashton Kutcher is old and British subjects are being pushed into "Minority Report" territory. Welcome to your online trends report for August 12, 2013. Trending now What: Breaking Bad, AMC Where: Google search, Twitter Why: "Breaking Bad," on AMC, is one of the most successful TV shows in recent memory. Sony Pictures Television grows worldwide, expanding channels into 840 million households. The man behind it all? A certain former John Carroll janitor, now at the helm of one of the biggest television studios in Hollywood.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 9, 2008
What Happens in Vegas is the kind of terrible mistake performers as big as Cameron Diaz and Ashton Kutcher usually make at the beginning of their careers, when they're anxious to break into the movies, or at the end, when they're struggling for a comeback. It's a screwed-up screwball farce about a slacker (Kutcher) and a go-getter (Diaz) who meet and get married one drunken night in Las Vegas. They win a $3 million jackpot with her quarter and his pull on a one-armed bandit and are sentenced to "six months hard marriage" when they try to get an annulment and sue each other for the money.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
Tom and Sarah meet cute. They act cute. Gosh darn it, they flat-out are cute. Which is the extent of positive things to be said about Just Married, a mercilessly unappealing romantic comedy about two young people who fall in love, get married, go on the honeymoon from hell and return, each convinced that the other is the root of all evil in the world. Wonderful movies have been made from far flimsier premises. But most of them featured screenwriters who knew how to build a joke, directors who knew how to pace a sequence, characters who managed to be at least occasionally appealing and actors who could play more than one note.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | March 12, 2008
WHAT ARE we to make of Ashton Kutcher's new series, Pop Fiction? Kutcher, the creator of Punk'd - a show I dislike heartily - has now turned his trickery on the media, staging events with real celebrities (or faux celebs like Paris Hilton), fooling paparazzi and other press outlets. Kutcher says, "We're having fun, but we want to say to people, `Can you really believe everything you read and see?'" Uh. Really? I'm shocked, shocked to discover that things aren't always what they appear to be. I didn't believe Paris Hilton on Larry King, talking about changing her life, so why would her participation in a "real" stunt, change my outlook about the media, how it feeds off celebrity and how celebrity feeds off media?
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Cheaper by the Dozen is equal parts fantasy and cautionary tale, a film that manages to be uplifting and off-putting simultaneously - fortunately, more the former than the latter. The movie is based (loosely) on a popular 1948 book of the same title, about a New Jersey family whose size (12 children) humorously thwarted the efficiency-expert father's attempts to run his house like a factory. That story was made into a film in 1950, starring Clifton Webb and Myrna Loy. This modern update, with the father transformed into a football coach, suffers by losing any sense of inventiveness and playing the same old notes when it comes to the family-vs.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | March 12, 2008
WHAT ARE we to make of Ashton Kutcher's new series, Pop Fiction? Kutcher, the creator of Punk'd - a show I dislike heartily - has now turned his trickery on the media, staging events with real celebrities (or faux celebs like Paris Hilton), fooling paparazzi and other press outlets. Kutcher says, "We're having fun, but we want to say to people, `Can you really believe everything you read and see?'" Uh. Really? I'm shocked, shocked to discover that things aren't always what they appear to be. I didn't believe Paris Hilton on Larry King, talking about changing her life, so why would her participation in a "real" stunt, change my outlook about the media, how it feeds off celebrity and how celebrity feeds off media?
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 29, 2006
Walking up the dusty Hollywood canyon in 100-degree heat, inhaling great gulps of smog, I begin to wonder if I'm being punk'd. It's not that I'm famous or anything, it's just that my hiking partner is Ashton Kutcher, who created the MTV show where people are subjected to elaborate, ego-puncturing practical jokes -- they're punk'd. He's also well known for starring as the dumb brunet on That '70s Show, headlining such cinematic milestones as Dude, Where's My Car?, and marrying Demi Moore, who happens to be 15 years his senior.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 29, 2006
The Guardian is that rarest of cinematic commodities: an action movie displaying brains and heart and the opportunity for its stars to do something more than keep the narrative flowing between explosions. Perhaps that should come as no surprise, as it was directed by Andrew Davis, whose 1993 The Fugitive remains a high-water mark for modern action-adventure flicks. It's also one of the few in which the acting - especially Tommy Lee Jones' Oscar-winning turn as a no-nonsense U.S. marshal - was as lauded as the action.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 25, 2005
Guess Who plays out the shock of a beautiful black daughter (Zoe Saldana) introducing her white fiance (Ashton Kutcher) to her formidable parents (Bernie Mac and Judith Scott) with grace and humanity, whether addressing the racial content or transcending it. Oh, it's full of stunned looks and dueling stereotypes, and the most daring, hilarious scene comes when Mac demands that Kutcher repeat some black jokes that the boy has heard around his family's dinner table. But the movie's sweetness, wit and charm go beyond its can't-we-all-just-get-along premise.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Cheaper by the Dozen is equal parts fantasy and cautionary tale, a film that manages to be uplifting and off-putting simultaneously - fortunately, more the former than the latter. The movie is based (loosely) on a popular 1948 book of the same title, about a New Jersey family whose size (12 children) humorously thwarted the efficiency-expert father's attempts to run his house like a factory. That story was made into a film in 1950, starring Clifton Webb and Myrna Loy. This modern update, with the father transformed into a football coach, suffers by losing any sense of inventiveness and playing the same old notes when it comes to the family-vs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
Tom and Sarah meet cute. They act cute. Gosh darn it, they flat-out are cute. Which is the extent of positive things to be said about Just Married, a mercilessly unappealing romantic comedy about two young people who fall in love, get married, go on the honeymoon from hell and return, each convinced that the other is the root of all evil in the world. Wonderful movies have been made from far flimsier premises. But most of them featured screenwriters who knew how to build a joke, directors who knew how to pace a sequence, characters who managed to be at least occasionally appealing and actors who could play more than one note.
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February 7, 2008
48 James Spader Actor 46 Garth Brooks Country singer 43 Chris Rock Actor-comedian 30 Ashton Kutcher Actor 23 Tina Majorino Actress
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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Orlando Sentinel | September 29, 2006
Animation fans, young and old, know that there is but one question for cartoon critters, one basic truth worth pondering in an imponderable universe. That is, is it "Wabbit season," or "Duck season"? Open Season (Sony Pictures) Voiced by Martin Lawrence, Ashton Kutcher, Billy Connolly, Debra Messing, Gary Sinise. Directed by Roger Allers, Jill Culton. Rated PG. Time 89 minutes.
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