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By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
Mount Airy Middle School's new principal says she doesn't plan any immediate changes in the 700-student school, but she does have some long-term goals."
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
At home, you might find Matt Ashmore reaching into his tool chest for the right socket wrench to speed up the restoration of his 1969 Dodge Polara. But at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the 30-year-old aerospace engineer has spent the past several years developing a sleek new power screwdriver for spacewalking NASA astronauts. They'll need it to pop the hoods of two broken-down scientific instruments on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Ashmore heads a team of more than 35 in Goddard's Crew Aids and Tools Development office in Greenbelt.
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NEWS
September 10, 1998
THE LACK OF attention being paid to the primary election for seats on Howard County's Board of Education belies the importance of the race.County schools are as much an attraction to families as all the new residential development between Baltimore and Washington found here. Howard schools consistently rank among the top in Maryland. The makeup of the school board is vital to the system's continued success.The primary election is nonpartisan, with candidates running at large. Seven candidates are seeking four spots on the general election ballot.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
On May 13, 2006 DORIS L. (nee Kougl) beloved wife of the late Frederick E. Schneider, devoted mother of Deborah D. Blake, loving grandmother of Michael E. Fogus, Jamie Renee Blake and Tina Ashmore, loving great grandmother of Keita Fogus, Gary and Amanda Ashmore. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME P.A., 237 East Patapsco Ave (Brooklyn) on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where funeral services will be held on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. Interment Crownsville Cemetery.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
On May 13, 2006 DORIS L. (nee Kougl) beloved wife of the late Frederick E. Schneider, devoted mother of Deborah D. Blake, loving grandmother of Michael E. Fogus, Jamie Renee Blake and Tina Ashmore, loving great grandmother of Keita Fogus, Gary and Amanda Ashmore. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME P.A., 237 East Patapsco Ave (Brooklyn) on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where funeral services will be held on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. Interment Crownsville Cemetery.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs were embedded in hardened mud. Three men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A full day after learning that her school was awarded a Blue Ribbon of Excellence, Principal Virginia Ashmore of Mount Airy Middle was "still just floating." Officials at the Maryland State Department of Education had summoned Ashmore, her staff and representatives of eight other Maryland middle and high schools to Baltimore on Tuesday, supposedly to talk about the programs of the schools that were finalists for the annual Blue Ribbon awards. "We went down armed with all of our papers and accumulated data," Ashmore recalled.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs embedded in hardened mud. Three men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs embedded in hardened mud. Three men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2000
THANKS TO community support and the dedication of parent volunteers, pupils at Mount Airy Middle School begin each school day with a six-minute morning news program called "Mount Airy Live." Each morning since school reopened after the winter holiday break, televisions in each homeroom have been tuned to Channel 4 for the pupil-run broadcast originating in the school's media center. Pupils read the news, and help directors and videographers plan and present the daily newscasts. The budding broadcast journalists are advised by Frank Tippet, Extended Enrichment teacher.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs embedded in hardened mud. Three men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs embedded in hardened mud. Three men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Jessica Valdez and Jessica Valdez,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2003
Crumbling stone slabs formed the broken walls of a ruined shelter in Savage Park, the floor was carpeted with dead leaves and twigs embedded in hardened mud. Three middle-aged men clutched their GPS electronic navigation units as they strode into the wall-encircled clearing. Their searching gazes suggested they weren't far from their goal. Jason Ashmore's eyes scanned every crevice in the stone walls. He paused and suddenly bent down, reached into a hole under a stone slab and pulled out a white plastic container marked in bold black letters, "GEOCACHING.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2002
Fourteen months ago, when the last batch of MSPAP scores were released, Virginia Ashmore and her staff at Mount Airy Middle School thought they had things figured out. Their eighth-graders' scores on Maryland's annual assessment examinations went up in each of six tested categories, from a modest 3.7-point gain in reading to a whopping 22.1-point leap in writing. "Last year, we thought we really had it. It was, `Ah, hah, we know what we're doing,'" Ashmore recalled. "But this year, it was, `Boom,' and we're right back to not being able to figure things out."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A full day after learning that her school was awarded a Blue Ribbon of Excellence, Principal Virginia Ashmore of Mount Airy Middle was "still just floating." Officials at the Maryland State Department of Education had summoned Ashmore, her staff and representatives of eight other Maryland middle and high schools to Baltimore on Tuesday, supposedly to talk about the programs of the schools that were finalists for the annual Blue Ribbon awards. "We went down armed with all of our papers and accumulated data," Ashmore recalled.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2000
THANKS TO community support and the dedication of parent volunteers, pupils at Mount Airy Middle School begin each school day with a six-minute morning news program called "Mount Airy Live." Each morning since school reopened after the winter holiday break, televisions in each homeroom have been tuned to Channel 4 for the pupil-run broadcast originating in the school's media center. Pupils read the news, and help directors and videographers plan and present the daily newscasts. The budding broadcast journalists are advised by Frank Tippet, Extended Enrichment teacher.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
At home, you might find Matt Ashmore reaching into his tool chest for the right socket wrench to speed up the restoration of his 1969 Dodge Polara. But at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the 30-year-old aerospace engineer has spent the past several years developing a sleek new power screwdriver for spacewalking NASA astronauts. They'll need it to pop the hoods of two broken-down scientific instruments on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Ashmore heads a team of more than 35 in Goddard's Crew Aids and Tools Development office in Greenbelt.
NEWS
September 10, 1998
THE LACK OF attention being paid to the primary election for seats on Howard County's Board of Education belies the importance of the race.County schools are as much an attraction to families as all the new residential development between Baltimore and Washington found here. Howard schools consistently rank among the top in Maryland. The makeup of the school board is vital to the system's continued success.The primary election is nonpartisan, with candidates running at large. Seven candidates are seeking four spots on the general election ballot.
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