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NEWS
August 27, 2014
In response to your recent editorial on the threat posed by the emerald ash borer to Baltimore's tree canopy, I would like to respond to questions regarding the impact of insecticide treatments on the Chesapeake Bay and groundwater supplies ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 25). The method we are recommending the city use is one utilized by most cities that are treating their trees -- a sealed trunk injection with TREE-äge insecticide. This product is very different in terms of how it is applied and how it reacts in the environment.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
Doing something about the imminent slaughter of the city's ash trees as a result of arrival of the emerald ash borer in Baltimore should be a rallying cry for citizens to get educated about trees ( "Enemy at the gates," Aug. 26). Through understanding comes action, and what this town needs is more TreeKeepers. Free city-wide TreeKeepers classes are offered this September and I urge everyone to become educated about ash trees, the insects that threaten them and how trees really do function as the lungs of our city.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Like the arrival of a Medieval plague, alien invaders are knocking on Baltimore's door. No, we are not talking about foreign armies storming the beaches or bug-eyed creatures from outer space bent on global domination. But it's almost as bad. We are referring, of course, to the recent appearance in Baltimore of the emerald ash borer, a species of voracious Asian beetle that since 2006 has killed millions of white and green ash trees in its relentless march across North America. In June, city arborists trapped a couple of the critters in Druid Hill Park, a sure sign that more are on the way. If nothing is done, some 290,000 ash trees on city owned property could be at risk of being wiped out over the next few years.
EXPLORE
June 24, 2011
Where Prince George's County has used a large scalpel, Howard County is hoping to cure the patient — the indigenous ash tree — with a less invasive chemical treatment. For now, at least, this approach is prudent. Although, officials must be prepared to move quickly if more aggressive measures become necessary. Prince George's was the entry point in Maryland for the emerald ash borer in 2003, and its larvae have been eating ash trees alive there ever since. After a quarantine failed to stop the spread of this pest, officials there made the call in 2006 to fell every ash tree within a five-mile radius of the infested area.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 14, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the spread of a voracious ash tree-killing beetle to a wooded region of northern Charles County. Previously, the pest, commonly called the emerald ash borer, had been limited to a site south of Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County. In recent years, the beetle has been blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. The latest detection is in a wooded area of Charles County just over the border from Prince George's.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Just weeks after it turned up in Howard County, the emerald ash borer has been detected in Anne Arundel and Allegany counties. Maryland agriculture officials have responded by placing all Maryland counties west of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay under quarantine. Movement of ash wood and trees, and all hardwood firewood, out of the zone is banned, and all movement of hardwood firewood within the zone is discouraged. "Buy it where you burn it," officials urged. The quarantine is "the best way to secure Maryland's Eastern Shore, where EAB has not been found to date, and protect our riparian forest buffer plantings," said state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
Armed with a map and a big box of traps, Mickey Kopansky and Charles Pickett are on the hunt for the Green Menace. Emerald ash borers have already killed tens of millions of ash trees across the United States. The invasive species of beetle from Asia was introduced through wood packing material in 2002 in Michigan and through nursery trees a year later in Maryland. If they're not stopped, the carnage will continue around the country and perhaps even in metropolitan Baltimore, where ash trees are the most common tree, frequently used for landscaping and fire wood, as well as tool handles, flooring and baseball bats.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 22, 2012
With Memorial Day about to kick off the unofficial start of summer, agriculture officials are warning the public not to take firewood with them if they go on camping or cookout trips - those logs could harbor some unseen, tree-destroying hitchhikers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has declared this Emerald Ash Borer Awareness Week, in hopes it will slow the spread of this destructive beetle from Asia, which officials say has killed tens of millions of ash trees so far. Probably brought in on some imported packing material, the borer was first spotted in Michigan in 2002, but has spread to 14 other states since, including Maryland.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Just weeks after it turned up in Howard County, the emerald ash borer has been detected in Anne Arundel and Allegany counties. Maryland agriculture officials have responded by placing all Maryland counties west of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay under quarantine. Movement of ash wood and trees, and all hardwood firewood, out of the zone is banned, and all movement of hardwood firewood within the zone is discouraged. "Buy it where you burn it," officials urged. The quarantine is "the best way to secure Maryland's Eastern Shore, where EAB has not been found to date, and protect our riparian forest buffer plantings," said state Agriculture Secretary Buddy Hance.
EXPLORE
June 24, 2011
Where Prince George's County has used a large scalpel, Howard County is hoping to cure the patient — the indigenous ash tree — with a less invasive chemical treatment. For now, at least, this approach is prudent. Although, officials must be prepared to move quickly if more aggressive measures become necessary. Prince George's was the entry point in Maryland for the emerald ash borer in 2003, and its larvae have been eating ash trees alive there ever since. After a quarantine failed to stop the spread of this pest, officials there made the call in 2006 to fell every ash tree within a five-mile radius of the infested area.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
Armed with a map and a big box of traps, Mickey Kopansky and Charles Pickett are on the hunt for the Green Menace. Emerald ash borers have already killed tens of millions of ash trees across the United States. The invasive species of beetle from Asia was introduced through wood packing material in 2002 in Michigan and through nursery trees a year later in Maryland. If they're not stopped, the carnage will continue around the country and perhaps even in metropolitan Baltimore, where ash trees are the most common tree, frequently used for landscaping and fire wood, as well as tool handles, flooring and baseball bats.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | September 14, 2008
The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the spread of a voracious ash tree-killing beetle to a wooded region of northern Charles County. Previously, the pest, commonly called the emerald ash borer, had been limited to a site south of Andrews Air Force Base in Prince George's County. In recent years, the beetle has been blamed for the destruction of 25 million ash trees, including about 25,000 in Maryland. The latest detection is in a wooded area of Charles County just over the border from Prince George's.
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