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Ash Disposal

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NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals yesterday issued Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. a grading permit to begin disposing of fly ash at Brandonwood Business Park on Solley Road in Glen Burnie.BGE has used fly ash, a waste product from its coal-fired generators at the Brandon Shores and Wagner Point power plants, as structural fill material on two parcels of land across from the power plant since 1982.The Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash appealed in mid-April the grading permit that would allow BGE to use a third parcel for fly ash disposal, saying the company had failed to meet a grading requirement to have on hand an overall site plan.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
State environmental officials approved new coal-ash landfill in southeast Baltimore Tuesday, saying "state-of-the-art" pollution controls there should allay nearby residents' fears that the power plant waste will blow into their neighborhoods and leak into the Patapsco River. After more than a year of deliberation, the Maryland Department of the Environment authorized the disposal of up to 650,000 tons of ash in a specially prepared section of a chemical company landfill at Hawkins Point.
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NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
A bill aimed at strictly regulating the disposal of fly ash has died quickly in committee.The bill was proposed by Del. Mary M. Rosso, an Anne Arundel County Democrat who is a longtime advocate of controlling the fine gray dust left when coal is burned.The legislation would have required owners of power plants -- namely Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. -- to build clay liners under the ash dumping ground and to monitor air and water quality.Delegates dropped the bill on a 16-2 vote Saturday in the Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 8, 2009
WASHINGTON -People in 34 states who live near 210 coal ash lagoons or landfills with inadequate lining have a higher risk of cancer and other diseases from contaminants in their drinking water, two environmental groups reported Thursday. Twenty-one states have five or more of the high-risk disposal sites near coal-fired power plants. Maryland has five. The groups - the Environmental Integrity Project and Earthjustice - said a 2002 Environmental Protection Agency document that the agency didn't release until March of this year adds information about toxic releases from these facilities to nearby water systems and data on how some contaminants accumulate in fish and deer and can harm the health of people who hunt and fish.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Solley-area residents are to congregate this afternoon at a local church to preach about their fears of fly ash contamination to an assortment of officials, including U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest and representatives of the Army Corps of Engineers.The meeting, which the Republican congressman organized, is scheduled for 2 p.m. at Solley United Methodist Church. Gilchrest said he wants to hear out residents opposed to Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s fly ash disposal site across Solley Road from the community.
NEWS
August 31, 2007
The cancer-causing metals detected in more than 50 wells in Gambrills have provided ample proof of the dangers posed by improper coal ash disposal. But now it's up to state and federal regulators to craft a solution beyond simply banning ash from Anne Arundel County. At issue is an 80-acre sand and gravel surface mine where coal ash has been used as fill material since the mid-1990s. That's not an uncommon way to dispose of ash - the fine mineral remains of coal combustion - but, in retrospect, the relatively porous and unlined excavations at Gambrills were ill-suited for this purpose.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
The state announced long-awaited rules yesterday to keep toxic substances from leaking from coal-ash dumps. The regulations require liners and runoff collection systems at all new dump sites accepting coal ash. The purpose is to prevent harmful metals and chemicals from leaching into ground water or nearby streams. Dump operators must also take steps to prevent ash from being blown onto neighboring properties. The state Department of the Environment proposed regulating coal-ash dumps after it was discovered that toxic chemicals had contaminated the wells of 23 homes near two sand-and-gravel pits in Gambrills.
NEWS
July 28, 1999
FAMILIES burying their loved ones at sea shouldn't throw caution -- or their loved ones' remains -- to the wind. Yet some people have been careless in scattering ashes -- tossing them just offshore into recreational waters without regard to the people who boat, fish or swim there.This problem has come up time and again in the Anne Arundel community of Venice on the Bay, where people sometimes toss ashes in the water even as children swim nearby. And at least once, ashes have blown onto spectators.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | March 30, 1997
PERSISTENCE is Carl Hackmann's most obvious characteristic.Mr. Hackmann is leading the charge against the third increment of BGE's fly ash disposal plan at Brandon Woods Energy Business Park.The Riviera Beach resident represents the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash, a collection of people who live or have lived along Solley Road near BGE's large Brandon Shores power plant in northern Anne Arundel County.To the chagrin of BGE executives, the Riviera Beach resident is a skeptic and a relentless fighter.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1998
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. must install a $10 million clay liner under its fly ash disposal site in the Solley area to prevent polluting leaks, the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals has ordered.The board issued the costly verdict to BGE last week after months of hearings in which Solley residents challenged the utility's use of 1.6 million tons of fly ash as filler in a new section of the Brandon Woods Industrial Park.Two other sections of the park have been filled in with fly ash but do not have clay liners.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
FROSTBURG -The state fined Constellation Energy $1 million for contaminating wells in Gambrills by dumping millions of tons of ash from its power plants in old gravel mines there. But with the state's blessing, another energy company is dumping hundreds of thousands of tons of ash into active mine pits in Western Maryland. Eighteen-wheel trucks routinely deposit steaming loads of ash from the Warrior Run power plant at a hillside coal mine overlooking the hamlet of Carlos just south of here.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 26, 2008
The state announced long-awaited rules yesterday to keep toxic substances from leaking from coal-ash dumps. The regulations require liners and runoff collection systems at all new dump sites accepting coal ash. The purpose is to prevent harmful metals and chemicals from leaching into ground water or nearby streams. Dump operators must also take steps to prevent ash from being blown onto neighboring properties. The state Department of the Environment proposed regulating coal-ash dumps after it was discovered that toxic chemicals had contaminated the wells of 23 homes near two sand-and-gravel pits in Gambrills.
NEWS
August 31, 2007
The cancer-causing metals detected in more than 50 wells in Gambrills have provided ample proof of the dangers posed by improper coal ash disposal. But now it's up to state and federal regulators to craft a solution beyond simply banning ash from Anne Arundel County. At issue is an 80-acre sand and gravel surface mine where coal ash has been used as fill material since the mid-1990s. That's not an uncommon way to dispose of ash - the fine mineral remains of coal combustion - but, in retrospect, the relatively porous and unlined excavations at Gambrills were ill-suited for this purpose.
NEWS
July 28, 1999
FAMILIES burying their loved ones at sea shouldn't throw caution -- or their loved ones' remains -- to the wind. Yet some people have been careless in scattering ashes -- tossing them just offshore into recreational waters without regard to the people who boat, fish or swim there.This problem has come up time and again in the Anne Arundel community of Venice on the Bay, where people sometimes toss ashes in the water even as children swim nearby. And at least once, ashes have blown onto spectators.
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Fly ash problem in Solley is hardly settledThe editorial, "Burying the fly ash debate" (July 16), unfortunately sounded more like Baltimore Gas and Electric Co's public-relations spin than balanced, well-researched journalism.Had the writer attended any one of the 17 hearings before three different judicial bodies or contacted one of the numerous experts, lawyers, governmental agency representatives or participants for the community, he might have been better prepared to make a judgment.1)
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
The state Board of Morticians wants to add a set of guidelines to its regulations in an attempt to stop people from using a private beach on the Chesapeake Bay to dispose of the ashes of loved ones.The board began contemplating guidelines on how to properly dispose of cremated remains last fall, after residents of a cozy Pasadena community as picturesque as its name -- Venice on the Bay -- began complaining about visitors scattering ashes from their beach.The board's guidelines remind people that even though the state does not require that cremated remains be placed in a cemetery, "this does not mean that cremated remains can be freely scattered or otherwise disposed of upon public domain, or upon the private property of another person."
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
Federal and state environmental agencies are looking into whether to require air quality controls for a fly ash disposal site in North Anne Arundel County after a meeting yesterday in which nearby residents asked the officials for an air-monitoring station.The residents, many of them members of the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash (CCCAF), fear that fly ash particles in the air could cause respiratory problems.Representatives from the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment met in South Baltimore with a local Sierra Club leader, Solley community residents and two air experts who backed the residents' request.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 8, 2009
WASHINGTON -People in 34 states who live near 210 coal ash lagoons or landfills with inadequate lining have a higher risk of cancer and other diseases from contaminants in their drinking water, two environmental groups reported Thursday. Twenty-one states have five or more of the high-risk disposal sites near coal-fired power plants. Maryland has five. The groups - the Environmental Integrity Project and Earthjustice - said a 2002 Environmental Protection Agency document that the agency didn't release until March of this year adds information about toxic releases from these facilities to nearby water systems and data on how some contaminants accumulate in fish and deer and can harm the health of people who hunt and fish.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
A bill aimed at strictly regulating the disposal of fly ash has died quickly in committee.The bill was proposed by Del. Mary M. Rosso, an Anne Arundel County Democrat who is a longtime advocate of controlling the fine gray dust left when coal is burned.The legislation would have required owners of power plants -- namely Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. -- to build clay liners under the ash dumping ground and to monitor air and water quality.Delegates dropped the bill on a 16-2 vote Saturday in the Environmental Matters Committee.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
Federal and state environmental agencies are looking into whether to require air quality controls for a fly ash disposal site in North Anne Arundel County after a meeting yesterday in which nearby residents asked the officials for an air-monitoring station.The residents, many of them members of the Coalition of Communities and Citizens Against Fly Ash (CCCAF), fear that fly ash particles in the air could cause respiratory problems.Representatives from the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment met in South Baltimore with a local Sierra Club leader, Solley community residents and two air experts who backed the residents' request.
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