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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2002
Dr. Eduard Ascher, a psychiatrist who taught at the Johns Hopkins University for 49 years, died Thursday in a Towson nursing home of congestive heart failure. He was 86. A native of Vienna, Austria, Dr. Ascher emigrated to the United States in 1938 to escape the Nazis' domination of his country. "He always said, `Bred in Vienna, a crumb in Baltimore,'" said his wife, Amalie Adler Ascher. He was a specialist in group therapy and a nationally known expert on Tourette's syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes people to make involuntary movements or sounds, including uttering profanity in some cases.
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BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2005
Amalie Adler Ascher hails from a family of collectors. Still, this fact does not prepare a guest for a visit to her home. Beyond the front door of her two-bedroom apartment in Towson's retirement community of Edenwald are bright splashes of fabric color, the high-polish gleam of antique furniture and walls peppered with tapestries, paintings and porcelain. "The residents who see [my place] call this the Edenwald Museum," says Ascher, 78, and a former gardening columnist for The Sun. Yet, this "museum" is actually a downsized version of her former life.
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NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | April 6, 1991
John B. Ascher's campaign for mayor got off to a rocky start yesterday.Mr. Ascher, a follower of political extremist Lyndon LaRouche, arrived to make his official announcement in City Hall Plaza just as a light rain began to fall.Moments later, a City Hall guard strode across the plaza to inquire -- with a scowl -- just what he and his half-dozen supporters were doing.And although Mr. Asher eagerly offered campaign literature to anyone who looked his way as they hurried past, few people bothered to take it.One man who did take his campaign handout read a few lines before crumpling it into a ball.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
When the weekly coffee klatch at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson folded in December, Amalie Ascher, a regular contributor, turned to friends to eat her rum balls and meringues. But there was only so much they could do. Ascher -- a dessert diva who never cooks the same sweet twice -- was running out of mouths to feed. "I was literally going around the building and asking people, `Would you like to try this?' `Would you like to try that?'" the 77-year-old widow said recently.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
On March 27, 2004, RUTH SCHAFFER (nee Hutzler); beloved wife of the late Dr. Alexander J. Schaffer; beloved mother of Anna Schaffer Ascher, of NY and the late Louis H. Schaffer; devoted sister of Jane Hutzler Wolf, of Baltimore, MD and the late Charles G. Hutzler, III; loving grandmother of Natalie Schaffer O'Neill, Michael W. Schaffer, Andrew L. Schaffer, Deborah Ascher Barnstone, Rachel Ascher, Stephen L. Ascher. Also survived by eight great-grandchildren. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 14, 2005
Amalie Adler Ascher hails from a family of collectors. Still, this fact does not prepare a guest for a visit to her home. Beyond the front door of her two-bedroom apartment in Towson's retirement community of Edenwald are bright splashes of fabric color, the high-polish gleam of antique furniture and walls peppered with tapestries, paintings and porcelain. "The residents who see [my place] call this the Edenwald Museum," says Ascher, 78, and a former gardening columnist for The Sun. Yet, this "museum" is actually a downsized version of her former life.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
When the weekly coffee klatch at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson folded in December, Amalie Ascher, a regular contributor, turned to friends to eat her rum balls and meringues. But there was only so much they could do. Ascher -- a dessert diva who never cooks the same sweet twice -- was running out of mouths to feed. "I was literally going around the building and asking people, `Would you like to try this?' `Would you like to try that?'" the 77-year-old widow said recently.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | May 7, 1991
Two years ago, members of a fund-raising organization called Southeast Literature Sales befriended Helen B. Overington, a Baltimorean in her 80s who lived alone in an apartment across from the Johns Hopkins University athletic fields.They would visit her often in the Broadview Apartments on West University Parkway to assure her that her concerns about political upheaval in Eastern Europe and other problems were worth caring about -- and worth lots of money in donations for solutions.Soon, the sums the organization asked of her were astronomical.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J WYNN ROUSUCK | August 13, 1993
"Camera Obscura"When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 7 p.m. Sundays; through Aug. 22Where: AXIS Theatre, 3600 Clipper Mill RoadTickets: $8 and $9Call: (410) 243-5237*** "What I remember didn't happen, and what happened, I don't remember," says the protagonist in K. Siobhan Wright's "Camera Obscura," AXIS Theatre's second production in the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.The reliability of memory -- particularly childhood memory -- is one of the more intriguing issues in this domestic drama, which is set during the emotionally charged Christmas season.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | August 29, 1991
Gene L. Michaels can't find a fare anywhere. That's not good for his candidacy for mayor.A cab driver on and off for 30 years, Michaels conducts his campaign for mayor of Baltimore from the front seat of his Checker cab. When he gets a fare, the fare gets his spiel. When he drives around for 90 minutes on a hot August afternoon and can't find a single fare, a reporter gets it."I definitely think I have a chance to win," Michaels said, as his eyes searched the sidewalk for a lost and befuddled face.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
On March 27, 2004, RUTH SCHAFFER (nee Hutzler); beloved wife of the late Dr. Alexander J. Schaffer; beloved mother of Anna Schaffer Ascher, of NY and the late Louis H. Schaffer; devoted sister of Jane Hutzler Wolf, of Baltimore, MD and the late Charles G. Hutzler, III; loving grandmother of Natalie Schaffer O'Neill, Michael W. Schaffer, Andrew L. Schaffer, Deborah Ascher Barnstone, Rachel Ascher, Stephen L. Ascher. Also survived by eight great-grandchildren. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2002
Dr. Eduard Ascher, a psychiatrist who taught at the Johns Hopkins University for 49 years, died Thursday in a Towson nursing home of congestive heart failure. He was 86. A native of Vienna, Austria, Dr. Ascher emigrated to the United States in 1938 to escape the Nazis' domination of his country. "He always said, `Bred in Vienna, a crumb in Baltimore,'" said his wife, Amalie Adler Ascher. He was a specialist in group therapy and a nationally known expert on Tourette's syndrome, a neurological disorder that causes people to make involuntary movements or sounds, including uttering profanity in some cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J WYNN ROUSUCK | August 13, 1993
"Camera Obscura"When: 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 7 p.m. Sundays; through Aug. 22Where: AXIS Theatre, 3600 Clipper Mill RoadTickets: $8 and $9Call: (410) 243-5237*** "What I remember didn't happen, and what happened, I don't remember," says the protagonist in K. Siobhan Wright's "Camera Obscura," AXIS Theatre's second production in the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.The reliability of memory -- particularly childhood memory -- is one of the more intriguing issues in this domestic drama, which is set during the emotionally charged Christmas season.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | August 29, 1991
Gene L. Michaels can't find a fare anywhere. That's not good for his candidacy for mayor.A cab driver on and off for 30 years, Michaels conducts his campaign for mayor of Baltimore from the front seat of his Checker cab. When he gets a fare, the fare gets his spiel. When he drives around for 90 minutes on a hot August afternoon and can't find a single fare, a reporter gets it."I definitely think I have a chance to win," Michaels said, as his eyes searched the sidewalk for a lost and befuddled face.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | May 7, 1991
Two years ago, members of a fund-raising organization called Southeast Literature Sales befriended Helen B. Overington, a Baltimorean in her 80s who lived alone in an apartment across from the Johns Hopkins University athletic fields.They would visit her often in the Broadview Apartments on West University Parkway to assure her that her concerns about political upheaval in Eastern Europe and other problems were worth caring about -- and worth lots of money in donations for solutions.Soon, the sums the organization asked of her were astronomical.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | April 6, 1991
John B. Ascher's campaign for mayor got off to a rocky start yesterday.Mr. Ascher, a follower of political extremist Lyndon LaRouche, arrived to make his official announcement in City Hall Plaza just as a light rain began to fall.Moments later, a City Hall guard strode across the plaza to inquire -- with a scowl -- just what he and his half-dozen supporters were doing.And although Mr. Asher eagerly offered campaign literature to anyone who looked his way as they hurried past, few people bothered to take it.One man who did take his campaign handout read a few lines before crumpling it into a ball.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 17, 2009
The grounds and gardens around the Edenwald Retirement Community in Towson are perfectly manicured, but not by the residents. Though many of them gardened at their own homes, gardening is something they left behind when they went to live at Edenwald. That is, until Amalie Adler Ascher, who has been a resident for seven years, suggested a Parsley Club. She proposed it last summer in a "Flower Talk" column she writes for the newsletter, and now it is one of the most successful clubs at the 400-resident community.
NEWS
August 1, 1991
Declare war on crime, Culotta urges mayorSaying it's time to stop violent criminals from playing "Russian Roulette" with innocent people, Republican mayoral hopeful Samuel A. Culotta wants Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to put his foot down about crime.Culotta says the mayor should ask Gov. William Donald Schaefer to declare a state of emergency in Baltimore.The reason? The order would allow "a minimum of 200 to 400" State Police or state militia members to be deputized as city police officers for six months.
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