Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAsbury Park
IN THE NEWS

Asbury Park

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
Sandy, the aurora is rising behind us This pier lights our carnival life forever Oh, love me tonight and I promise I'll love you forever.- From "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)," by Bruce Springsteen ASBURY PARK, N.J. - This is the story of a love affair of sorts between a rock legend and this gritty beach town of 17,000, some 40 miles south of New York. Yet sometimes, as on this overcast morning just before Christmas, you wonder what the rocker, Bruce Springsteen, sees in the old girl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Katharine W. Dougherty, a retired University of Maryland, Baltimore County office worker, died Aug. 28 at her Millersville home of chronic myeloid leukemia. She was 77. The daughter of G. Theodore Weis, a Baltimore City psychiatric court clerk, and Gladys D. Weis, who took over her husband's job after his death, the former Katharine Amelia Weis was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. She left Eastern High School in the 11th grade and took a job in the admissions office at the Johns Hopkins University.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ronald Smothers and Ronald Smothers,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 1998
ASBURY PARK, N.J. -- In the last dozen years this long-sagging New Jersey shore city has seen an eclectic bunch of would-be rescuers, with plans ranging from the mundane to the sublime.There was the Indian tribe that wanted to open a boardwalk casino. There were the followers of the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi who bought a beachfront hotel in a plan to create transcendental meditation center.And there was the developer who proposed a series of entertainment pavilions along the boardwalk, saying the family of Michael Jackson would operate one and Jacques Cousteau's organization another.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  CATARRH As I struggle with the sinus infection that I have been battling for more than two weeks,* I offer you catarrh  (pronounced kuh-TAR), the traditional word for the abundant production of mucus as a consequence of the inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose and throat.  It is a word that comes into English with a lng pedigree: the Old French ca tarrhe , the Latin catarrhus , and the Greek Katarrous , ultimately from the Greek katarrein , "to flow down.
TRAVEL
By Marion Winik and Marion Winik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2002
Today I saw a ghost. I saw the white sands of Asbury Park, N.J., filled with bright bikinis, striped umbrellas, children with pails and shovels. Lifeguards on a wooden platform monitored a throng of boogie boarders and wave jumpers, as judges with clipboards and sunglasses reviewed the entries in a sand- castle contest: a mermaid astride a dolphin, a stylish art deco couple kissing inside a deep hole, a bathing beauty. Up on the boardwalk, a queue awaited the next batch of french fries at the Mayfair snack bar. This was not just another day at the beach; it was an out-and-out apparition, for there has been nothing like it in my hometown for a long, long time.
NEWS
April 8, 1998
The Sun's "Reading by 9" series has been named a co-winner of the 1998 James K. Batten Award for Excellence in Civic Journalism.The Sun shared the award, given by the Pew Center for Civic Journalism in Washington, with a group of newspapers and television stations in Idaho and the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press."Reading by 9," which examined shortcomings in how reading is taught in Maryland schools, was called a "clear example of activist journalism" by the editors and television news executives who selected the series from 83 entries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard | January 13, 2005
More greetings from Asbury Park They've been called "One of the best bands out of Asbury Park in recent years" by the New York Press. No, we're not talking about Springsteen. This time, Asbury Park gave birth to deSol, a rock band with a Latin soul that is performing Sunday at Rams Head Live. This seven-member band blends English and Spanish lyrics with Latin beats to provide "the perfect crash course in moving ... , Latin-style" according to Pulse Weekly. The group's self-titled album will be released in April.
NEWS
July 4, 2008
LARRY HARMON, 83 Bozo the Clown entrepreneur Larry Harmon, who appeared as Bozo the Clown for decades and licensed the name to other Bozos around the world, died yesterday at his home of congestive heart failure, his longtime publicist, Jerry Digney, told the Associated Press. Although not the first person to play Bozo, Mr. Harmon took on the famous clown's persona and, as an entrepreneur, he licensed the character to others, particularly TV stations. Those stations then recruited their own Bozos for local shows.
NEWS
September 18, 2003
On September 13, MARJORIE STORY THOMASON, died at her home in Chevy Chase, MD at the age of 77. The daughter of J. Howard Story and Helen Story of Asbury Park, NJ, she graduated from Asbury Park High School in 1944, a classmate of her future husband of 57 years, Robert A. Thomason. From 1956 to 1967 she was active as a volunteer in the Head start and mental health programs in Baltimore and served in numerous voluntary roles at the Park School, of which Mr. Thomason was headmaster. In 1969 she co-founded the Lambert's Cove Inn on the Island of Martha's Vineyard and during the ensuing decade became widely known as a charming hostess and an extraordinary chef.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  CATARRH As I struggle with the sinus infection that I have been battling for more than two weeks,* I offer you catarrh  (pronounced kuh-TAR), the traditional word for the abundant production of mucus as a consequence of the inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose and throat.  It is a word that comes into English with a lng pedigree: the Old French ca tarrhe , the Latin catarrhus , and the Greek Katarrous , ultimately from the Greek katarrein , "to flow down.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2010
Rosalea Della, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric worker who was recognized by President George H.W. Bush for her many hours of volunteer service, died of a pulmonary embolism Tuesday at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 93 and had lived in Pasadena. She was born Rosalea Muriel Streckfus in Baltimore and lived her early years in Canton. Several years ago she wrote a memoir of her life in which she recalled her family's basement kitchen: "The black iron range was always kept burning hot in the winter.
NEWS
July 4, 2008
LARRY HARMON, 83 Bozo the Clown entrepreneur Larry Harmon, who appeared as Bozo the Clown for decades and licensed the name to other Bozos around the world, died yesterday at his home of congestive heart failure, his longtime publicist, Jerry Digney, told the Associated Press. Although not the first person to play Bozo, Mr. Harmon took on the famous clown's persona and, as an entrepreneur, he licensed the character to others, particularly TV stations. Those stations then recruited their own Bozos for local shows.
NEWS
October 16, 2007
A little more than two weeks before the eyes of the entire horse racing world will be trained on Monmouth Park for the Breeders' Cup, a study commissioned by Gov. Jon Corzine questioning the viability of the New Jersey horse racing industry was released. That's hardly a way to celebrate the sport's premier attraction. Racing is the lifeblood of the state's $3.2 billion horse industry, which has fallen on hard times, largely because of competition from neighboring states where the tracks draw fans to "racinos."
NEWS
By Jenny Hopkinson and Jenny Hopkinson,Sun reporter | August 13, 2007
What's the best way to create the perfect skate park? Don't make it look like a skate park. Turns out that concrete skate bowls, pre-fabricated ramps and half-pipes are so yesterday. Many who've been weaned on ESPN's X-Games would rather ride and grind in a "skate plaza" with benches, stairs and rails as props for their acrobatics -- essentially the same type of public places from which skateboarders are often banished for upsetting pedestrians. "The city of Baltimore probably has a plaza that's really good to skateboard," said Gary Ream, president of USA Skateboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Lidard | January 13, 2005
More greetings from Asbury Park They've been called "One of the best bands out of Asbury Park in recent years" by the New York Press. No, we're not talking about Springsteen. This time, Asbury Park gave birth to deSol, a rock band with a Latin soul that is performing Sunday at Rams Head Live. This seven-member band blends English and Spanish lyrics with Latin beats to provide "the perfect crash course in moving ... , Latin-style" according to Pulse Weekly. The group's self-titled album will be released in April.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Katharine W. Dougherty, a retired University of Maryland, Baltimore County office worker, died Aug. 28 at her Millersville home of chronic myeloid leukemia. She was 77. The daughter of G. Theodore Weis, a Baltimore City psychiatric court clerk, and Gladys D. Weis, who took over her husband's job after his death, the former Katharine Amelia Weis was born in Baltimore and raised in Waverly. She left Eastern High School in the 11th grade and took a job in the admissions office at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jenny Hopkinson and Jenny Hopkinson,Sun reporter | August 13, 2007
What's the best way to create the perfect skate park? Don't make it look like a skate park. Turns out that concrete skate bowls, pre-fabricated ramps and half-pipes are so yesterday. Many who've been weaned on ESPN's X-Games would rather ride and grind in a "skate plaza" with benches, stairs and rails as props for their acrobatics -- essentially the same type of public places from which skateboarders are often banished for upsetting pedestrians. "The city of Baltimore probably has a plaza that's really good to skateboard," said Gary Ream, president of USA Skateboard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.