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By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland Casualty Co. officials figured they were free and clear. Their policy covering a Baltimore mechanical contracting firm now being sued by asbestosis victims had expired years ago.But the state Court of Appeals reshaped their thinking a bit yesterday. The company must pay legal fees to defend Lloyd E. Mitchell Inc., in each of the 3,000 asbestos cases filed against it and must pay any judgments against the firm, within policy limits, Maryland's highest court ruled.The "bodily injury" that plaintiffs cited in their suits occurred while Maryland Casualty's policies were in effect, even if the disease resulting from those injuries didn't surface for more than a decade, the unanimous court held.
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NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 15, 2007
When guests arrived at the National Federation of the Blind's Jernigan Institute for the organization's "2007 Celebration," they were faced with some difficult choices. Should they check out the silent auction first? Maybe they should start at the food stations, sampling some of the fabulous dishes offered by local chefs? And what about all those old friends to catch up with? Honorary chair Don Frieson and his wife, Marilyn, had gone the auction route first thing. Frieson, a senior vice president of Wal-Mart, already had his bid in on a "very special cognac" in the silent auction.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
Dr. James P. Keogh, who exposed cases of asbestosis and lung cancer in steel and construction workers, leading to nationwide lawsuit settlements, died Monday of liver cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 49.Dr. Keogh, who last served as associate professor of medicine and director of the University of Maryland Occupational Health Project, was a young specialist and director of the old City Hospitals' occupational and environmental health program when, during the late 1970s, he became increasingly alarmed at the high incidence of asbestosis and lung cancer in steel workers from Local 2610 whom he was examining for retirement benefits.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
Anthony LaBue, who operated a popular downtown dry cleaning establishment in the heart of The Block in Baltimore during the 1960s, died of complications from carotid artery surgery Wednesday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 72. Frequented by ship captains, judges and exotic dancers, Ben-Tone Cleaners was a fixture on East Baltimore Street for a decade, in a spot occupied since by the Jewel Box nightclub. Mr. LaBue ran the business with his wife, the former Irma Lynch, and the two of them -- he of Sicilian origin, she a red-haired Irishwoman -- made a good team, said daughter Michele DeShong of Perry Hall.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
A group of Aberdeen Proving Ground employees braved the heat yesterday to protest the potential loss of up to 558 jobs because of the Army's decision to privatize some nonmilitary work at the Harford County base.The rally, organized by the Vietnam Veterans of Aberdeen Proving Ground/Edgewood Area, drew about 100 people who held signs and waved to honking drivers outside the base's gate on Route 24.Clint Smith, one of the organizers of yesterday's protest, said the group wants to draw attention to the disruption for workers at Aberdeen, which is among the county's largest employers.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2001
Anthony LaBue, who operated a popular downtown dry cleaning establishment in the heart of The Block in Baltimore during the 1960s, died of complications from carotid artery surgery Wednesday at Mercy Medical Center. He was 72. Frequented by ship captains, judges and exotic dancers, Ben-Tone Cleaners was a fixture on East Baltimore Street for a decade, in a spot occupied since by the Jewel Box nightclub. Mr. LaBue ran the business with his wife, the former Irma Lynch, and the two of them -- he of Sicilian origin, she a red-haired Irishwoman -- made a good team, said daughter Michele DeShong of Perry Hall.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | April 15, 2007
When guests arrived at the National Federation of the Blind's Jernigan Institute for the organization's "2007 Celebration," they were faced with some difficult choices. Should they check out the silent auction first? Maybe they should start at the food stations, sampling some of the fabulous dishes offered by local chefs? And what about all those old friends to catch up with? Honorary chair Don Frieson and his wife, Marilyn, had gone the auction route first thing. Frieson, a senior vice president of Wal-Mart, already had his bid in on a "very special cognac" in the silent auction.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 8, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Owens-Illinois Inc. has suffered another setback in its ongoing struggle to shake itself free of asbestos lawsuits.The Maryland Court of Appeals yesterday upheld most of the damages against the Toledo manufacturer won by two former Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard employees who suffer from asbestosis, an incurable lung disease.The state's highest court ruled that Othello Armstrong, 76, of Baltimore, a former welder, and Forrest Wood, 79, of Kissimmee, Fla., a retired rigger, were entitled to compensatory damages.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1995
Terry Theis has always been a tough guy, whether hoisting a 400-pound pipe at a job site or throwing his shoulder into a fullback on the football field. A steamfitter by trade, he was an all-star strong safety for the Baltimore Eagles, the only player to have his number retired by the semi-pro football club.Now he's lucky if he can walk to the courthouse without gasping for air.At 54, Terry Theis has asbestosis. His lungs are scarred by tiny asbestos fibers, and he is slowly suffocating. His breath sometimes is so shallow that he lies awake, careful not to wake his wife, and wonders what it's like to be buried alive.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
A state appeals court ordered a Baltimore Circuit Court judge yesterday to reconsider the asbestos suit filed by the family of a deceased Bethlehem Steel shipyard worker, ruling that the date of the injuries might not bar the claim. The Court of Special Appeals ordered that Judge Richard T. Rombro more thoroughly review a 1992 asbestos verdict before ruling on whether to dismiss the suit filed by Joyce Ragin of Baltimore. Ragin filed a wrongful-death suit in 1990 against Porter Hayden Co. of Baltimore, alleging that her father, Flemmie Pettiford, suffered from asbestosis as a result of exposure to asbestos while he was a rigger at Bethlehem Steel's Fairfield shipyard from 1943 to 1945.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
A group of Aberdeen Proving Ground employees braved the heat yesterday to protest the potential loss of up to 558 jobs because of the Army's decision to privatize some nonmilitary work at the Harford County base.The rally, organized by the Vietnam Veterans of Aberdeen Proving Ground/Edgewood Area, drew about 100 people who held signs and waved to honking drivers outside the base's gate on Route 24.Clint Smith, one of the organizers of yesterday's protest, said the group wants to draw attention to the disruption for workers at Aberdeen, which is among the county's largest employers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
Dr. James P. Keogh, who exposed cases of asbestosis and lung cancer in steel and construction workers, leading to nationwide lawsuit settlements, died Monday of liver cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 49.Dr. Keogh, who last served as associate professor of medicine and director of the University of Maryland Occupational Health Project, was a young specialist and director of the old City Hospitals' occupational and environmental health program when, during the late 1970s, he became increasingly alarmed at the high incidence of asbestosis and lung cancer in steel workers from Local 2610 whom he was examining for retirement benefits.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1995
Terry Theis has always been a tough guy, whether hoisting a 400-pound pipe at a job site or throwing his shoulder into a fullback on the football field. A steamfitter by trade, he was an all-star strong safety for the Baltimore Eagles, the only player to have his number retired by the semi-pro football club.Now he's lucky if he can walk to the courthouse without gasping for air.At 54, Terry Theis has asbestosis. His lungs are scarred by tiny asbestos fibers, and he is slowly suffocating. His breath sometimes is so shallow that he lies awake, careful not to wake his wife, and wonders what it's like to be buried alive.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | April 8, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Owens-Illinois Inc. has suffered another setback in its ongoing struggle to shake itself free of asbestos lawsuits.The Maryland Court of Appeals yesterday upheld most of the damages against the Toledo manufacturer won by two former Bethlehem Steel Corp. shipyard employees who suffer from asbestosis, an incurable lung disease.The state's highest court ruled that Othello Armstrong, 76, of Baltimore, a former welder, and Forrest Wood, 79, of Kissimmee, Fla., a retired rigger, were entitled to compensatory damages.
BUSINESS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland Casualty Co. officials figured they were free and clear. Their policy covering a Baltimore mechanical contracting firm now being sued by asbestosis victims had expired years ago.But the state Court of Appeals reshaped their thinking a bit yesterday. The company must pay legal fees to defend Lloyd E. Mitchell Inc., in each of the 3,000 asbestos cases filed against it and must pay any judgments against the firm, within policy limits, Maryland's highest court ruled.The "bodily injury" that plaintiffs cited in their suits occurred while Maryland Casualty's policies were in effect, even if the disease resulting from those injuries didn't surface for more than a decade, the unanimous court held.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove | October 25, 1992
The best thing about asbestos is the worst thing about asbestos.Its fibers are nearly indestructible, which is why the mineral was such a desirable element in fireproofing and insulation material. Once someone inhales the fibers, they cannot be broken down or dislodged. Over time, the lungs become inflamed, scarred and finally too stiff to force adequate oxygen into the bloodstream.Called asbestosis, this condition is the most common illness associated with asbestos. In a worst-case scenario, it literally chokes its victim to death.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2005
The asbestos inhaled by residents of Libby, Mont., was never good for much - not for strengthening concrete, soundproofing buildings or insulating boilers, brake pads or clutches. But if someone were to design an asbestos fiber that stood a good chance of triggering cancers and respiratory disorders, experts say, he could hardly have done better. Nature made six types of asbestos, magnesium silicates that exist in nature as bundles of tiny fibers that can fray or be picked apart. The kind that occurred in the W.R. Grace & Co. vermiculite mine is known as tremolite, but not all tremolite is created equal.
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