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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
An advocacy group filed a complaint Friday with the federal government alleging that a Baltimore-based company put hundreds of employees at risk by failing to protect them against asbestos. Alexandra Rosenblatt and Jonathan F. Harris, staff lawyers with the Public Justice Center, said WMS Solutions LLC required its employees, who typically earn from $11 to $14 an hour, to pay for medical exams, training and protective equipment such as gloves, goggles and respirators. If workers didn't pay upfront, the costs were deducted from their paychecks, according to the complaint.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A crew of asbestos removal workers were operating equipment that had them more than 40 feet in the air when a former Bethlehem Steel Corp. building in Sparrows Point collapsed around them, according to a Baltimore County police report. A day after the accident that sent several workers to area hospitals, police issued a preliminary report Tuesday indicating some workers may have been dismantling part of the building as others conducted asbestos removal in another area. Officials for the companies working at the site declined to offer additional details of the incident, and state officials said a full investigation could take up to four months.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 29, 1993
Westminster has had three projects in three years to remove asbestos from municipal buildings, and is starting a fourth.The $14,287 contract to remove asbestos from the newly acquired Longwell Municipal Center, the former National Guard Armory on Longwell Avenue, is Westminster's largest asbestos removal project to date.The City Council awarded the contract to Marcor Environmental Inc. of Elkridge last week.City officials knew the old armory contained asbestos before Mayor W. Benjamin Brown began negotiating to buy the building from the state in 1992.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
An advocacy group filed a complaint Friday with the federal government alleging that a Baltimore-based company put hundreds of employees at risk by failing to protect them against asbestos. Alexandra Rosenblatt and Jonathan F. Harris, staff lawyers with the Public Justice Center, said WMS Solutions LLC required its employees, who typically earn from $11 to $14 an hour, to pay for medical exams, training and protective equipment such as gloves, goggles and respirators. If workers didn't pay upfront, the costs were deducted from their paychecks, according to the complaint.
NEWS
March 22, 1997
Contractors removing asbestos from two federal government properties in Maryland have been fined a total of $25,500 for unsafe handling of the hazardous insulating material.The Maryland Department of the Environment levied a $15,500 fine against Hudak Asbestos Removal of Baltimore for violations from December 1995 to May 1996 at the Fallon federal office building at Hopkins Plaza.The company was cited for allegedly endangering its workers and the federal employees in the building by not requiring removal crews to wear protective clothing and by not wetting asbestos to prevent it from becoming airborne.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 7, 1994
The Anne Arundel County Planning Advisory Board approved a transfer of $330,000 yesterday to pay for asbestos removal and the demolition of abandoned warehouses on county-owned property on Ordnance Road in Glen Burnie.County officials will demolish nine dilapidated warehouses on property that was once part of an Army munitions depot so the federal government can proceed with the removal of radioactive soil.The 85-acre tract was the site favored by County Executive Robert R. Neall for a new detention center, but that plan was dropped after the radiation was discovered.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | August 23, 1991
They turned a standard ribbon-cutting ceremony at Walbrook Senior High School yesterday into a celebration that was part homecoming and part family reunion.A small marching band strutted up and down the sidewalk. Neighbors, politicians, and former and current students greeted each other with smiles of achievement. Finally, after more than three years and$14.2 million, the 20-year-old school at 2000 Edgewood Street in West Baltimore was open again.Samuel R. Billups Jr., the school's principal, recalled the day in May 1988 when he was called at home and told his school would be closed for asbestos removal.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
The asbestos contamination that shuttered Maiden Choice School in Arbutus this week is unusual but not unexpected in school systems such as Baltimore County's that are removing the material from aging buildings, experts said yesterday. Cleanup crews spent yesterday throwing away or cleaning metal bed frames, wheelchairs and other items that were in the hallway when it was contaminated by asbestos last week. Asbestos debris was found in the hallway Saturday after workers preparing to remove the hazardous material as part of a $2 million maintenance project accidentally broke through a wall, stirring up the fibers.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
After four months of trial, a Baltimore Circuit Court jury has begun deliberations in the city's lawsuit seeking $18 million-plus to pay for removal of asbestos from its schools, libraries, jails, police headquarters and recreation centers.The attorneys completed their closing arguments yesterday and, as they cheerfully gathered the hundreds of court exhibits, predicted a wait for a verdict of at least two days. Judge Joseph I. Pines called back the jury foreman to discuss plans for Friday.
NEWS
May 17, 1992
The Odenton Branch of the Anne Arundel County Library is closed through June 1 for roof repairs and asbestos removal.Patrons may use the nearby branches at Provinces in the Severn Square Shopping Center, Maryland City in the Maryland City Shopping Center, or Crofton in the Crofton Centre.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Walls covered in cork caught fire Thursday in a vacant brewery complex in Southeast Baltimore's Brewers Hill, a fire official said. Firefighters were called to the historic building about 2 p.m., said Capt. Roman Clark, a spokesman for the Baltimore City Fire Department. The fire was primarily confined to the third and fourth floors, he said, and was still being fought Thursday evening. Heavy fire, smoke and the collapse of interior walls created unsafe conditions and firefighters were ordered for a time from the building, part of the old Gunther Brewery complex in the 1200 block of S. Conkling St., Clark said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
A Baltimore property owner and a New York contractor have been fined a combined $1.3 million in what state officials say is the highest penalty ever levied for improper asbestos removal. After a two-day trial in Baltimore City Circuit Court, Judge Stephen J. Sfekas imposed a fine of $115,500 against the owner of 2315 St. Paul St. and $1.2 million against Erie Vera LLC, a New York demolition contractor, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. Acting on an anonymous tip, an MDE inspector in September 2007 found a large amount of improperly removed abestos in the six-story building, which was being converted to apartments.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2002
The asbestos contamination that shuttered Maiden Choice School in Arbutus this week is unusual but not unexpected in school systems such as Baltimore County's that are removing the material from aging buildings, experts said yesterday. Cleanup crews spent yesterday throwing away or cleaning metal bed frames, wheelchairs and other items that were in the hallway when it was contaminated by asbestos last week. Asbestos debris was found in the hallway Saturday after workers preparing to remove the hazardous material as part of a $2 million maintenance project accidentally broke through a wall, stirring up the fibers.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2002
A recent asbestos leak has led school officials to close Maiden Choice School in Arbutus, which has 120 students with special needs, for the rest of the week. The leak apparently occurred when workers broke through a hallway wall as part of a $2 million maintenance project at the 51-year-old school Thursday night, said Douglas J. Neilson, a school system spokesman. After a weekend cleanup, tests indicated asbestos levels in the hallway are back below federal standards, Neilson said. But the school will remain closed so testing can be done throughout the building and asbestos elsewhere in the school removed.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2002
Centerpoint, the highly publicized retail and residential project that is considered a key to reviving downtown Baltimore's west side, is back on track after the developer smoothed over late-summer glitches. A new asbestos-removal firm has been hired to clean nine buildings that will be restored. Bank of America, the developer, fired the first company after a dispute, turning the site into a ghost town for weeks. Behind the scenes, the bank has lined up $4 million in additional state and city funds to close a budget gap revealed in September.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2000
Barrels of hazardous chemicals were removed from a South Baltimore warehouse yesterday morning, as the building's owner yielded to pressure from city and state officials after negotiating with them late into the night before. Residents who live near the warehouse believe they are getting sick from chemicals stored and dumped there, and have been asking city and state officials to clean up the site. Mayor Martin O'Malley promised he would have the drums of chemicals removed by noon if the owner didn't do it. It took four workers from CleanVenture Inc., a hazardous materials handler, 20 minutes to pull 11 barrels containing substances believed to be hydrochloric acid and paint waste out of the building at 1700 Clarkson St. The job was completed at noon.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
Councilwoman Virginia P. Clagett last night introduced a new rubble landfill bill that incorporates changes suggested by community members, including lowering a landfill's height and shortening its hours of operation.The bill replaces a measure introduced in the County Council last month by Mrs. Clagett. Both bills incorporate suggestions from a citizens task force that studied the issue for three years.Mrs. Clagett, D-West River, said the bill recognizes the need for landfills that take in rubble generated by construction and seeks to impose environmental and operating controls that minimize annoyance to nearby residents.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
A Baltimore property owner and a New York contractor have been fined a combined $1.3 million in what state officials say is the highest penalty ever levied for improper asbestos removal. After a two-day trial in Baltimore City Circuit Court, Judge Stephen J. Sfekas imposed a fine of $115,500 against the owner of 2315 St. Paul St. and $1.2 million against Erie Vera LLC, a New York demolition contractor, according to the Maryland Department of the Environment. Acting on an anonymous tip, an MDE inspector in September 2007 found a large amount of improperly removed abestos in the six-story building, which was being converted to apartments.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
The City Council approved last night $2 million to pay for cost overruns on the $27 million renovation of police headquarters. Before the council voted on the appropriation, Councilman Nicholas D'Adamo read from a Planning Department staff report that said the renovation project could cost another $10 million. Baltimore has hired a claims consultant to review the project's records and to determine if the city can reduce some of the projected $12 million in cost overruns, Deputy Mayor David Scott said.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Gerard Shields and Eric Siegel and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
Baltimore residents will vote Tuesday on whether the city should borrow up to $45 million on a range of projects, from city home buying to cultural investment. The issues -- 10 on the ballot -- are so numerous that they outnumber the contested local races for offices in the general election.Only six state legislative races -- out of 31 in the city -- were not determined by September's primary. Voters in the 1st, 3rd and ** 7th congressional districts, which encompass parts of the city, will choose their representatives.
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