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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
John Thomas "Dick" Burda, a retired asbestos worker and former Howard County resident, died Sunday of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised in Edmondson Village, Mr. Burda attended city public schools. He served with the Marine Corps in Korea during the Korean War, where he was wounded. He was later awarded the Purple Heart. For 35 years until retiring in 1989, Mr. Burda worked out of Pipe Coverers' Union 11, which is now Local 24. The longtime Ellicott City resident moved to Ocean Pines 15 years ago. He was an avid golfer and enjoyed fishing and crabbing with his family.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A crew of asbestos removal workers were operating equipment that had them more than 40 feet in the air when a former Bethlehem Steel Corp. building in Sparrows Point collapsed around them, according to a Baltimore County police report. A day after the accident that sent several workers to area hospitals, police issued a preliminary report Tuesday indicating some workers may have been dismantling part of the building as others conducted asbestos removal in another area. Officials for the companies working at the site declined to offer additional details of the incident, and state officials said a full investigation could take up to four months.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Columbia chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. reported profits Wednesday of $94.1 million last year, a big slide from 2011 that was driven by the company's $365 million non-cash charge for asbestos liabilities. But the charge, announced in January, was lower than expected for the fourth quarter. Wall Street seemed pleased by the earnings report and the company's rosier outlook for 2013 - Grace's stock was up nearly 4 percent in late morning trading, to about $75.40 a share. The company said it expects adjusted earnings before interest and taxes for this year will rise 8 to 12 percent over the same measure last year.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
State environmental officials and the owners of the Sparrows Point peninsula are moving toward a settlement to correct alleged regulatory violations at the former steelmaking site. Regulators say an array of problems have occurred over the past year on the 2,300-acre peninsula, including illegal open dumping of industrial sludge, improper handling of hazardous materials and the running of an unlicensed scrap tire operation. "We are drafting a settlement in the form of a consent order which will provide terms and a schedule for corrective actions - and which will include a financial penalty," Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson said in a statement.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun | September 25, 1990
The $15.9 million asbestos-removal and reconstruction project at Walbrook High School is continuing, with a contractor now replacing heating, ventilation, water and other mechanical systems.The school is due to reopen on schedule Sept. 1, 1991, when Walbrook students who have been temporarily sharing Southwestern High School are to move back into their own building.The building, designed for 2,500 students, was the subject of a major asbestos-removal project that got under way in March 1989.
NEWS
April 30, 1991
A pool of about 250 potential jurors arrived yesterday morning at Baltimore's Circuit Court, facing the possibility of six months' duty on an asbestos case in the nation's largest consolidated trial.The case, a consolidation of more than 9,000 personal injury claims against a dozen major asbestos manufacturers, began with asbestos-injury plaintiffs briefly picketing the courthouse.The picket signs prompted a defense motion to throw out the whole jury panel on the grounds that it might have been prejudiced.
NEWS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 5, 1992
NEW YORK -- A federal appeals court overturned lat yesterday the compensation plan for the massive Johns-Manville Corp. settlement trust, which was created in 1988 to pay thousands of asbestos disease claimants."
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Parents of the children at Sussex Elementary School in Essex are understandably worried. Late last month, officials closed the school after finding levels of asbestos fiber in a kindergarten classroom that were 30 times the amount considered acceptable. School officials' repeated attempts to allay fears are of little consolation: Parents, who know that related health problems do not show up for decades, have no idea whether their children were exposed to asbestos fibers and, if so, how much.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | April 29, 2008
Officials from the state's largest union say they have filed a complaint with a state health agency on behalf of employees at the city's child welfare services office, 1510 Guilford Ave., citing reports of active asbestos found in the building over the weekend. Joe Lawrence, a spokesman for the Maryland chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said contractors worked on the building and found what they believed to be asbestos on pipes. But Brian Wilbon, deputy secretary for operations for the Department of Human Resources, said no contractors worked on the building this weekend, and that the building was inspected twice in the past year and no asbestos was found.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | July 7, 1992
Early yesterday, a bus left the Steelworkers Hall in Dundalk carrying Lawrence Smith and 30 other people who have a stake in the nation's largest asbestos personal injury trial. They went to Baltimore Circuit Court to hear the closing arguments in the 4-month-old case, but the arguments were rescheduled for today.As Mr. Smith stood outside the courtroom in the Clarence Mitchell Jr. Courthouse, he said he and the others were not upset by the delay."They're not angry about it because they figured something like this would come up," said Mr. Smith, a 65-year-old plaintiff who claims to have contracted an asbestos-related disease during almost 43 years of work at the Bethlehem Steel Corp.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A Baltimore circuit judge rejected Wednesday a plan by the law firm of Peter G. Angelos to combine more than 10,000 asbestos-related lawsuits, questioning whether the cases caught in a massive backlog have enough in common to be heard in concert. "This Court is well aware of the need to provide justice for the large number of parties whose cases still languish on this docket," Judge John M. Glynn wrote. "But the current proposal is entirely too vague and unsupported to inspire confidence.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Peter Angelos, the personal injury lawyer who owns the Baltimore Orioles, donated $2.5 million to MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center to establish a lung disease treatment center in his name, he and hospital officials announced Wednesday. The gift, the largest single donation in the hospital's 115-year history, will more than pay for renovating a 3,000-square-foot space where doctors from various disciplines related to lung disease will collaborate and see patients. Those diseases include cancers like mesothelioma that are caused by asbestos exposure, the specialty of Angelos' Baltimore law firm.
BUSINESS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The law firm of Peter G. Angelos has scaled back its request for a Baltimore judge to group together almost 13,000 asbestos cases, asking the court to look only at cases where the plaintiffs alleged they contracted cancer as a result of their exposure to the poisonous material. The modified plan would still involve lumping together 4,600 cases, according to recent filings in the case. The remaining cases, which involve plaintiffs that have lung diseases other than cancer, could be handled in a similar way later on, Angelos lawyer Theodore M. Flerlage, Jr. wrote in court documents.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
A labor group is alleging that a supervisor with an asbestos abatement contractor at Dundalk High School pressured workers to drink alcohol on the job and violated safety standards. The company's attorney called the accusation "totally false" and said it is part of the group's strategy to unionize asbestos workers. The Laborers' Mid-Atlantic Regional Organizing Coalition said that some workers complained last month that the Colt Insulation site supervisor brought alcohol to the location.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 7, 2013
A contractor began to take down a house slated for demolition as part of a highway upgrade project in Aberdeen Tuesday and then abruptly stopped when the crew found some hidden asbestos. The home, at the corner of Route 22 and Graceford Drive, is one of 18 to be razed along Route 22 (Aberdeen Thruway) between Beards Hill Road and the Aberdeen Proving Ground gate in conjunction with BRAC-related intersection improvements along the highway. The ranch-style home at 355 Graceford was slated to be the first home demolished, according to a Maryland State Highway Administration media advisory sent Monday afternoon.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The Orioles' team doctor, William H. Goldiner, tended to orange-clad ballplayers at the same time as he diagnosed thousands of blue-collar workers with asbestos-related illnesses whose cases were taken up by prominent lawyer and team owner Peter G. Angelos. Angelos' firm is seeking to revive thousands of dormant asbestos cases, but some of the underlying diagnoses are facing new scrutiny from defense lawyers. They say Goldiner's dual roles call the integrity of his work into question - a contention he says is "insulting and absolutely false.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | January 20, 2002
Melvin Rice of Baltimore asks whether it's better to remove or to side over the asbestos shingle siding on his house when vinyl siding is installed. Half of the contractors he's talked with recommend removing the shingles, but the others say to leave them and side over. Asbestos-cement shingle siding is common on houses built or re-sided from the 1940s generally through the 1960s. In general, it was a very successful siding material and continues to perform well on many houses. As it ages, the factory finish deteriorates, but even then the shingles can be painted.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Fletcher and Kenneth R. Fletcher,Capital News Service | December 26, 2007
Maryland schools officials say they could be forced to test every new tile, pipe or wall put into school buildings for asbestos, under new guidance on Environmental Protection Agency regulations. State schools have relied in the past on material safety data sheets from manufacturers to determine whether hazardous materials, including asbestos, are in the products they are buying. But the EPA said it never accepted the data sheets under asbestos regulations. After the Maryland Department of the Environment asked the EPA a "clarifying question," Maryland schools were notified in September 2006 that the manufacturer's sheets could not be used to determine whether products contain asbestos, said EPA spokeswoman Donna Heron.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2013
Columbia chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. reported profits Wednesday of $94.1 million last year, a big slide from 2011 that was driven by the company's $365 million non-cash charge for asbestos liabilities. But the charge, announced in January, was lower than expected for the fourth quarter. Wall Street seemed pleased by the earnings report and the company's rosier outlook for 2013 - Grace's stock was up nearly 4 percent in late morning trading, to about $75.40 a share. The company said it expects adjusted earnings before interest and taxes for this year will rise 8 to 12 percent over the same measure last year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
Chemical maker W.R. Grace & Co. said Thursday it will adjust the estimated cost of settling its asbestos-related liabilities to $2 billion from the previous estimate of $1.7 billion. The increase reflects higher estimated values of a common stock warrant and deferred payment obligations to be paid to a trust to compensate personal-injury claimants and property owners under the company's bankruptcy reorganization. The company filed for Chapter 11 protection in 2001, partly as a result of asbestos-related lawsuits filed by residents of Libby, Mont., and others.
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