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By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
An auctioneer sold most of the run-down, boarded-up townhouses belonging to Arwell Court's largest landlord yesterday, marking a major step toward cleaning up one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Businessman Mark Woods of Chantilly, Va., bought 24 of Mohammad Zuberi's 30 townhouses on the Pioneer City street known for drugs, blight and gunshots. He paid about $7,000 for each, a fraction of what they were listed for when Zuberi bought them over the past three decades. The sale fell short of the $216,000 needed to pay off one of Zuberi's main creditors, Warfield Condominium Association No. 3, which governs Arwell Court.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
For much of the past decade, Arwell Court could not shake its reputation as one of Severn's most dangerous streets, a blighted block dead-ending into a court known for shootings, drug deals, broken windows and despair. But thanks to county resources, an active condominium association and an ambitious new owner, the cluster of townhouses in Pioneer City may have turned a corner. Several houses have been renovated, with new windows replacing broken glass and gleaming white doors replacing the old, paint-chipped entryways.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
The children playing kickball on the field at The Orchards at Severn know the rule: When the ball crosses over the fence and lands in Arwell Court, the game is over. They're not supposed to climb the wrought-iron bars that separate their quiet community of affordable salmon-and-khaki-colored rental townhouses from one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Here, they learn to stay away from the back yards of Arwell Court, where daytime shootings and drug deals are all too common.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
For much of the past decade, Arwell Court could not shake its reputation as one of Severn's most dangerous streets, a blighted block dead-ending into a court known for shootings, drug deals, broken windows and despair. But thanks to county resources, an active condominium association and an ambitious new owner, the cluster of townhouses in Pioneer City may have turned a corner. Several houses have been renovated, with new windows replacing broken glass and gleaming white doors replacing the old, paint-chipped entryways.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
For much of the past decade, Arwell Court could not shake its reputation as one of Severn's most dangerous streets, a blighted block dead-ending into a court known for shootings, drug deals, broken windows and despair. But thanks to county resources, an active condominium association and an ambitious new owner, the cluster of townhouses in Pioneer City may have turned a corner. Several houses have been renovated, with new windows replacing broken glass and gleaming white doors replacing the old, paint-chipped entryways.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
For much of the past decade, Arwell Court could not shake its reputation as one of Severn's most dangerous streets, a blighted block dead-ending into a court known for shootings, drug deals, broken windows and despair. But thanks to county resources, an active condominium association and an ambitious new owner, the cluster of townhouses in Pioneer City may have turned a corner. Several houses have been renovated, with new windows replacing broken glass and gleaming white doors replacing the old, paint-chipped entryways.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2002
For nearly a decade, residents and officials have battled Pioneer City's largest landlord over trash, crime and blight - with little success. In their bid to clean up Arwell Court, one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets, they have pursued Mohammad Zuberi through state and federal courts, through nuisance claims, liens and bankruptcy. The latest push: a lawsuit by the county Health Department, based on more than 1,000 alleged code violations on Arwell Court that include rodent infestations, rotting wood and malfunctioning plumbing.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
An auctioneer sold most of the run-down, boarded-up townhouses belonging to Arwell Court's largest landlord yesterday, marking a major step toward cleaning up one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Businessman Mark Woods of Chantilly, Va., bought 24 of Mohammad Zuberi's 30 townhouses on the Pioneer City street known for drugs, blight and gunshots. He paid about $7,000 for each, a fraction of what they were listed for when Zuberi bought them over the past three decades. The sale fell short of the $216,000 needed to pay off one of Zuberi's main creditors, Warfield Condominium Association No. 3, which governs Arwell Court.
NEWS
June 17, 1998
Anne Arundel County prosecutors dropped attempted-murder and related charges yesterday against a Severn man after the stabbing victim changed his story four times and no witnesses consistently corroborated his accounts."
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
The Anne Arundel County Health Department's case against a Severn landlord accused of ignoring more than 1,000 health-code violations on one of the county's most dangerous streets got off to a slow start yesterday, frustrating residents who had hoped the court would order immediate repairs. After nearly three hours of testimony, landlord Mohammad Zuberi and Assistant County Attorney Howard P. Nicholson still were arguing over the four-page list of repairs at one property -- 1800 Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
An auctioneer sold most of the run-down, boarded-up townhouses belonging to Arwell Court's largest landlord yesterday, marking a major step toward cleaning up one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Businessman Mark Woods of Chantilly, Va., bought 24 of Mohammad Zuberi's 30 townhouses on the Pioneer City street known for drugs, blight and gunshots. He paid about $7,000 for each, a fraction of what they were listed for when Zuberi bought them over the past three decades. The sale fell short of the $216,000 needed to pay off one of Zuberi's main creditors, Warfield Condominium Association No. 3, which governs Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
An auctioneer sold most of the run-down, boarded-up townhouses belonging to Arwell Court's largest landlord yesterday, marking a major step toward cleaning up one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Businessman Mark Woods of Chantilly, Va., bought 24 of Mohammad Zuberi's 30 townhouses on the Pioneer City street known for drugs, blight and gunshots. He paid about $7,000 for each, a small fraction of what they were listed for when Zuberi bought them over the past three decades.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
An auctioneer sold most of the run-down, boarded-up townhouses belonging to Arwell Court's largest landlord yesterday, marking a major step toward cleaning up one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Businessman Mark Woods of Chantilly, Va., bought 24 of Mohammad Zuberi's 30 townhouses on the Pioneer City street known for drugs, blight and gunshots. He paid about $7,000 for each, a fraction of what they were listed for when Zuberi bought them over the past three decades. The sale fell short of the $216,000 needed to pay off one of Zuberi's main creditors, Warfield Condominium Association No. 3, which governs Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
The children playing kickball on the field at The Orchards at Severn know the rule: When the ball crosses over the fence and lands in Arwell Court, the game is over. They're not supposed to climb the wrought-iron bars that separate their quiet community of affordable salmon-and-khaki-colored rental townhouses from one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets. Here, they learn to stay away from the back yards of Arwell Court, where daytime shootings and drug deals are all too common.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
The Anne Arundel County Health Department's case against a Severn landlord accused of ignoring more than 1,000 health-code violations on one of the county's most dangerous streets got off to a slow start yesterday, frustrating residents who had hoped the court would order immediate repairs. After nearly three hours of testimony, landlord Mohammad Zuberi and Assistant County Attorney Howard P. Nicholson still were arguing over the four-page list of repairs at one property -- 1800 Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
The Anne Arundel County Health Department's case against a Severn landlord accused of ignoring more than 1,000 health-code violations on one of the county's most dangerous streets got off to a slow start yesterday, frustrating residents who had hoped the court would order immediate repairs. After nearly three hours of testimony, landlord Mohammad Zuberi and Assistant County Attorney Howard P. Nicholson still were arguing over the four-page list of repairs at one property - 1800 Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2002
The Anne Arundel County Health Department's case against a Severn landlord accused of ignoring more than 1,000 health-code violations on one of the county's most dangerous streets got off to a slow start yesterday, frustrating residents who had hoped the court would order immediate repairs. After nearly three hours of testimony, landlord Mohammad Zuberi and Assistant County Attorney Howard P. Nicholson still were arguing over the four-page list of repairs at one property - 1800 Arwell Court.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
The day is made for going barefoot and spoiling dinner with ice cream cones. Eighty degrees and sunny, the afternoon is greeted on Arwell Court with open windows and children's laughter. But the drone of a distant lawn mower is shattered by loud pops of gunfire. When four bullets pierce the upper body of a 21-year-old convicted drug dealer, the happy shrieks of children riding bikes momentarily stop. Anne Arundel County Police Officer T.J. Smith speeds up in a patrol car minutes later to find dozens of people - from toddlers to grandmothers - mobbing the street.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2002
For nearly a decade, residents and officials have battled Pioneer City's largest landlord over trash, crime and blight - with little success. In their bid to clean up Arwell Court, one of Anne Arundel County's most dangerous streets, they have pursued Mohammad Zuberi through state and federal courts, through nuisance claims, liens and bankruptcy. The latest push: a lawsuit by the county Health Department, based on more than 1,000 alleged code violations on Arwell Court that include rodent infestations, rotting wood and malfunctioning plumbing.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell and Laura Barnhardt and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
The day is made for going barefoot and spoiling dinner with ice cream cones. Eighty degrees and sunny, the afternoon is greeted on Arwell Court with open windows and children's laughter. But the drone of a distant lawn mower is shattered by loud pops of gunfire. When four bullets pierce the upper body of a 21-year-old convicted drug dealer, the happy shrieks of children riding bikes momentarily stop. Anne Arundel County Police Officer T.J. Smith speeds up in a patrol car minutes later to find dozens of people - from toddlers to grandmothers - mobbing the street.
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