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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 18, 2001
"Wow," exclaimed Lesly Sajak, as she surveyed a packed party tent, "there are more people here than we expected." Some 1,000 supporters sipped cocktails and sampled an extensive buffet, before loudly applauding Sajak and her husband, Pat -- host of the TV game show "Wheel of Fortune" -- as they helped officially open the new Lesly and Pat Sajak Pavilion at the Anne Arundel Medical Center. Among those leading the applause were Sajak kids Patrick, 10, and Maggie, 6. Later, guests had a chance to get their first look inside the new pavilion, which houses the hospital's new breast center and centers for diabetes, vascular health and wellness, as well as other patient services and doctors' offices.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Antibiotics have saved countless lives over the years, but their overuse has lead to problems including antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Dr. Mary R. Clance, an epidemiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, discusses the history, troubles and appropriate uses of the drugs. How have antibiotics contributed to public health since their discovery and what is their status now? The collective memory of death from infectious disease is short-lived. Death from pneumonia, puerperal fever, post-operative infection, urinary and skin infections were commonplace just two generations ago. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death at the beginning of the 20th century.
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NEWS
July 15, 1996
Anne Arundel Medical Center now offers a full range of health care and health education services at Women's Health First, 476 Ritchie Highway in Severna Park.Dr. Louise DePodesta, a Severna Park resident, is the medical director of Women's Health First. The aim of the center is to provide a full range of health care needs at every stage of a woman's life, from a school sports physical through the childbearing years to menopause and old age.To learn more about Women's Health First, call 544-7711.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 20, 2014
Anne Arundel Medical Center has adopted a new policy that prohibits use of all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. And next year, the hospital plans to stop hiring anyone who uses tobacco products. The hospital has banned cigarette smoking on campus since 2007, like many hospitals, but the new policy in effect July 1 was expanded to include the smokeless products. And there will be no designated smoking areas in garages or on sidewalks. The policy applies to staff, as well as vendors and visitors.
NEWS
September 3, 1996
ONE DOESN'T have to be a clairvoyant to predict what the future holds for the downtown complex of the Anne Arundel Medical Center. Located in the heart of Annapolis, the hospital has nowhere to expand. As a result, more of its services -- inpatient as well as outpatient -- will move to its new Jennifer Road medical park in Parole, just beyond the city limits.It's no surprise, therefore, that hospital officials are again exploring the consolidation of all inpatient services at their suburban campus near the Annapolis Mall.
NEWS
May 25, 2009
Lyme disease, a highly preventable bacterial infection, strikes nearly 20,000 people a year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The peak incidence of Lyme disease will occur from May through early October, so now is the time to guard against the tick bites that transmit the infection. Dr. Thomas F. Hattar, of the Annapolis Center for Integrative Medicine and Anne Arundel Medical Center, offers five things to know about Lyme disease going into the summer season: * Lyme disease can usually be prevented by avoiding areas of tall grass and brush where ticks reside.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Anne Arundel Medical Center, continuing its rapid growth since moving out of downtown Annapolis three years ago, announced yesterday a $200 million expansion that hospital officials say will add operating rooms, surgical beds and more outpatient space to its campus off U.S. 50. A nine-story addition would be the centerpiece of the expansion, which would also include more parking on the campus, just outside Annapolis. The hospital would also add about 300 full-time workers to its staff of 1,695.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1999
The hulking eight-story Anne Arundel Medical Center tower has, for as long as anyone can recall, been an outcast on the leafy, residential blocks of old Annapolis.The bustle of nurses in scrubs, the flash of ambulance lights and the building itself -- drab and boxy -- have looked entirely out of place in a neighborhood where misty mornings greet residents in slippers, walking their dogs past century-old homes to the waterfront.So when hospital officials announced they would be moving to Parole after 99 years in downtown Annapolis, residents began hoping for a replacement that would blend in -- some muted, tasteful homes, unassuming townhouses, perhaps a few small shops.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
Since her twin boys were born prematurely six weeks ago, Amanda Logan has been driving 90 minutes each way from her home in St. Mary's County to Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. Her boys, Anderson Seth and Andrew Scott, have spent their entire lives in the neonatal intensive care unit there, where doctors and nurses can keep a 24-hour watch on the boys' fragile health. Usually Logan packs herself a lunch, which she eats while driving to or from the hospital. So she was happy yesterday to eat a free Mother's Day lunch for parents with babies in the neonatal intensive care unit, courtesy of Morton's The Steakhouse in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
Anne Arundel Medical Center and Johns Hopkins Medicine announced yesterday a strategic alliance, giving the Annapolis hospital a chance to take advantage of Hopkins' cachet and programs and providing Hopkins access to more suburban patients. The affiliation will mean that Arundel Medical can offer new services and that the two institutions can share the cost of developing satellite medical centers and other initiatives. It also means AMC will send some patients to Hopkins' giant East Baltimore campus for complex treatments.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
The head of aerospace technology firm ARINC and his wife have pledged at least $11 million to Anne Arundel Medical Center, the largest bequest ever to the hospital. John and Cathy Belcher of Edgewater will give the first $1 million to the hospital over the next several years.  At least $10 million will go to the hospital after the couple's death when their estate is liquidated. That amount could be higher depending on the value of the estate. The hospital will rename the Health Sciences Pavillion the “John and Cathy Belcher Pavillion," in honor of the couple's gift.
NEWS
By Dean Jones Jr., The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Officers responded to the 500 block of South Cherry Grove Avenue around 1:45 a.m. Tuesday for the report of a stabbing, Annapolis police said. The victim was walking away from the area, according to police, but did not provide any details about the stabbing or the suspect. Police said the victim had a total of five stab wounds and one laceration. The victim was transported to Anne Arundel Medical Center, police said. dean.jones@baltsun.com Orioles Insider | Live scores | Photos | Baseball app
HEALTH
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Charged with being all down-to-earth and accessible, the first thing doctors John Martin and Briana Walton did was lose the white coats. Then they got down to business. "I'm really very surprised that so many people came out," said a smiling Martin. "Absolutely," nodded a smiling Walton. And thus it went Tuesday evening at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis, as the hospital unveiled its monthly "DocsTalk" gatherings. Determined to make these informal health-information sessions as entertaining and jargon-free as possible, the hospital has come up with an approach that's equal parts "Today Show" and "Dr. Oz," but without the TV cameras.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 29, 2010
Carl Anthony "Chuck" Brunetto, former president and CEO of Anne Arundel Medical Center, died Saturday of respiratory failure at the hospital where he had worked for decades. The longtime Eastport resident was 79. Mr. Brunetto, the son of garment workers, was born and raised in Johnstown, N.Y., where he graduated in 1949 from Johnstown High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 from St. Bonaventure University in Allegany, N.Y., and completed pre-med studies at the University of Buffalo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
William F. Bruther, whose career as an Annapolis ophthalmologist spanned nearly 40 years and included having served as chief of ophthalmology at Anne Arundel Medical Center, died Thursday of liver failure at the medical center. He was 70. Dr. Bruther was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Annapolis, where his father was chief of personnel at the Naval Academy and his mother was a registered nurse. After graduating from St. Mary's High School in Annapolis in 1957, he entered Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in biology.
NEWS
November 23, 2009
Diverticulitis occurs when small, bulging pockets - or diverticula - occur within the colon and become infected. In most cases a slight or micro-perforation occurs. The majority of the time, the healthy body confines the infection to a very small space, and with time and a course of antibiotics, the infection will resolve itself. Dr. John L. Newman, a gastroenterologist with Anne Arundel Gastroenterology Associates, writes about diverticulitis. Diverticulosis, the presence of the pocket without infection, is very common as we grow older.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,Special to The Sun | November 8, 2006
Just like parents showing off their bundle of joy, Anne Arundel Medical Center is sharing its own new arrival: a $4 million neonatal intensive care unit for the hospital's tiniest patients. The bright, homey, yet high-tech NICU made its debut Sunday during a morning reception attended by an enthusiastic crowd of benefactors, medical staff and former patients who had received loving care in less-than-ideal circumstances in the hospital's former unit. At 7,000 square feet, it boasts 20 individual rooms for infants and overnight stays by parents.
NEWS
August 14, 2009
Maryland reports sixth death from swine flu Maryland health officials reported Thursday a sixth death associated with swine flu. Officials would not release details about the death, except to say it was an adult from the Washington suburbs with an underlying medical condition. As of last Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 436 deaths and 6,506 hospitalizations associated with the virus, known as H1N1. As infections continue to spread widely, the federal agency and state health departments have stopped recording confirmed flu cases that do not result in deaths or hospitalizations.
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