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By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 2007
Those bags of prepacked greens aren't just for salads. Some lend themselves to form the base of nutritious and delicious dressings for salads and sandwiches. Here, we're combining baby arugula and using its peppery flavor with the oniony tang of chives and orange juice. The beauty of these bold ingredients is that you can substitute low-fat mayonnaise for the full-fat variety and not miss a beat of flavor. Because we squeezed a fresh navel orange to supply our juice quotient, we decided to use the rest of the fruit as a garnish.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | March 12, 2013
President Barack Obama had a dinner date last week with a dozen of his worst enemies, thus proving that the governmental stalemate in Washington, D.C., is driving him to unusual acts of political creativity -- or desperation. The president personally picked up the tab for the private dinner at the Jefferson Hotel, and the guests were all Republican senators, including John McCain (Ariz.), Lindsey Graham (S.C.), Tom Coburn (Okla.), Bob Corker (Tenn.), Kelly Ayotte (N.H.), Dan Coats (Ind.)
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NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 12, 2004
A good break from the ubiquitous deboned, skinned chicken breasts are thighs. They can do about anything breasts can do, but will cook faster and have a richer flavor. This dish with chicken thighs can be cooked in one skillet and served in one bowl. When wilting the arugula, take care not to overcook. This green is tender and will lose all character if wilted as long as spinach. A little balsamic vinegar adds a lot of flavor, its sweetness complementing the chicken and the arugula. Cooking the onion just briefly allows it to keep its crunch, a nice contrast to the tender chicken.
EXPLORE
October 27, 2011
Espresso Amaretto Sundae (Serves 4) 4-6 ounces heavy whipping cream, whipped 3-4 tablespoons amaretto liquor 4 large scoops of good vanilla ice cream 8 amaretti or almond cookies, crumbled and separated 8 tablespoons hot espresso coffee Directions: * Whip the cream with a whisk, if making from scratch. When thick, fold in the amaretto liquor one tablespoon at a time and continue to whip. * Using four wine or martini glasses, crumble one cookie at the bottom of each glass.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 11, 2004
I am a bona fide food magazine junkie. Not only do I enjoy a number of American monthlies, but I'm also crazy about foreign publications. I read French culinary magazines during stays in France, and lately have been purchasing English and Australian issues at local bookstores. I'm always on the lookout for new trends in food and entertaining that can be turned into ideas for this column or for new recipes. My curiosity usually pays off, as it did a few weeks ago. While leafing through an Australian glossy, I spotted a potato salad with arugula and pancetta accents.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 19, 1999
You can make a great meal faster than you can pick up dinner at a Chinese carryout.But if that's not enough to convince you to get into the kitchen, how about a stronger argument? You can make a great meal that is cheaper, quicker and probably more healthful than one you buy.Since you're no doubt convinced, here's the menu: Cucumber and Arugula Salad and Noodles With Baby Bok Choy and Pork Tenderloin. The recipes serve two, but feel free to double or triple them for your needs.First, make the salad, a combination of delicately flavored cucumber and zesty arugula.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 14, 2003
More than a decade ago, I wrote an appetizer cookbook called First Impressions. The title reflects the way I feel about the little nibbles that begin a menu or stand alone when offered with drinks. Starters, I believe, are often afterthoughts, relegated to marginal importance, but, in fact, they deserve more attention since they are the first food (sometimes the only fare when served at a cocktail party) our guests sample. For me, perfect hors d'oeuvres should have three basic characteristics.
FEATURES
By JANE TALARICO and JANE TALARICO,MARYLAND COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE | October 27, 2007
Arugula, or Rocket Salad(Eruca sativa) Arugula's popularity has "rocketed" in recent years. An excellent late-season crop for home gardeners, arugula adds a zesty punch to dishes whether it's served raw (as in salads) or cooked, thanks to the spicy, peppery flavor of its leaves. Maybe that punch is why ancient Egyptians and Romans considered arugula seed oil to be an aphrodisiac. Plant seeds every few weeks in early spring or fall. Thin seedlings to 6-9 inches apart. Harvest the green, deeply cut, compound leaves when plants reach 8 to 10 inches, about six weeks after planting.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 17, 2005
Take a tip from the Italians, who like to serve arugula in salads, on top of pizza, or under grilled or sauteed meat. The slightly bitter greens make a great contrast to rich foods. Baby arugula has a less-bitter flavor and more tender leaves. We've teamed the greens with sliced strip steak for an easy summer dinner salad. Lemon, mustard and olive oil flavor the greens, and a topping of pecorino cheese, a hard sheep's milk cheese, finishes the dish. This is a dish with endless variations.
EXPLORE
October 27, 2011
Espresso Amaretto Sundae (Serves 4) 4-6 ounces heavy whipping cream, whipped 3-4 tablespoons amaretto liquor 4 large scoops of good vanilla ice cream 8 amaretti or almond cookies, crumbled and separated 8 tablespoons hot espresso coffee Directions: * Whip the cream with a whisk, if making from scratch. When thick, fold in the amaretto liquor one tablespoon at a time and continue to whip. * Using four wine or martini glasses, crumble one cookie at the bottom of each glass.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | August 25, 2011
Although it should be against the law to start classes before Labor Day, summer is over for most families here in the Free State. While the lunar calendar affords us a few more weeks until the autumnal equinox, the school calendar forces us to get back to some sort of mealtime routine. And that usually means supper in a hurry to fit our more regimented schedules. Indeed, even those of us without brilliant little students at home tend to adopt a slightly more regular schedule when school starts up again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
Visiting Milk & Honey Market, a new cafe and high-end grocery on Cathedral Street, reminded me of Morton's, a food and wine shop that once was located a few blocks away on West Eager Street. Both were in Mount Vernon, both dealt in high-quality food, both had pleasant vibes. There were some differences. Morton's, which was in business from 1984 to 1993, had shelves loaded with wine and spirits. Milk & Honey, which opened in November in the old Medical Arts Pharmacy at Cathedral and Read, has shelves stacked with groceries — most of it organic and locally sourced..
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | June 8, 2010
It happens every June: the invasion of the salad greens. Those little seeds that seemed so inconsequential back in April when you scattered them on the moist garden ground have now come to life, and with a vengeance. This year the combination of abundant moisture and relatively cool days have produced lush crops of lettuce and other greens. Even if you don't grow your own, the mounds of lettuce and its verdant relatives that appear at area farmers markets are signs that is a good season for salads.
FEATURES
By JANE TALARICO and JANE TALARICO,MARYLAND COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE | October 27, 2007
Arugula, or Rocket Salad(Eruca sativa) Arugula's popularity has "rocketed" in recent years. An excellent late-season crop for home gardeners, arugula adds a zesty punch to dishes whether it's served raw (as in salads) or cooked, thanks to the spicy, peppery flavor of its leaves. Maybe that punch is why ancient Egyptians and Romans considered arugula seed oil to be an aphrodisiac. Plant seeds every few weeks in early spring or fall. Thin seedlings to 6-9 inches apart. Harvest the green, deeply cut, compound leaves when plants reach 8 to 10 inches, about six weeks after planting.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 30, 2007
When we returned after being away on vacation for several weeks, some good friends suggested that we all catch up by having a pizza supper together. The hosts offered to pick up several varieties of pies from a local pizzeria (one that specializes in inventive creations) and to make a couple of sorbets for dessert. I volunteered to be in charge of the salad. At first I was going to toss together my mainstay "insalata" of mixed greens coated with a red-wine dressing, but in the back of my mind was the memory of an unusual recipe for a salad of arugula and baby spinach dressed in sherry vinaigrette garnished with thinly sliced cantaloupe and prosciutto.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,Tribune Media Services | August 5, 2007
On the first night my husband and I spent in Paris this summer, we unpacked our bags and headed out for supper. Tired from traveling, we ended up in a small Left Bank place that specializes in pizza and pasta. I was tempted by one of the day's specials listed on a blackboard --penne with fresh tomato sauce, arugula and parmesan. When I arrived back home several weeks later, I prepared a version that was close to the original. This simple main course does not take long to prepare, so it's ideal to use for warm weather entertaining when you want to minimize your time in the kitchen.
NEWS
By David Weisner | June 28, 2000
Editor's note: Close encounters with farm produce may be the result of one girl's science experiment. The place is Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey. The year is 1999. On May 11, after months of careful research and planning, Holly Evans launches vegetable seedlings into the sky. On May 18, the young scientist reports on her experiment. Holly intends to study the effects of extraterrestrial conditions on vegetable growth and development. She expects the seedlings to stay aloft for several weeks before returning to earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | June 8, 2010
It happens every June: the invasion of the salad greens. Those little seeds that seemed so inconsequential back in April when you scattered them on the moist garden ground have now come to life, and with a vengeance. This year the combination of abundant moisture and relatively cool days have produced lush crops of lettuce and other greens. Even if you don't grow your own, the mounds of lettuce and its verdant relatives that appear at area farmers markets are signs that is a good season for salads.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | March 11, 2007
Chris Richards selected a grilled flank steak with chimichurri sauce, grit cake with bacon and artichokes and Tomato Capote. Emica Boutilier held her plate out for a serving of arugula salad topped with orange fennel vinaigrette. "The salad is wonderful," said Boutilier, as she rustled through the arugula leaves with a fork. "I'm so excited. It wasn't made with iceberg lettuce." The salad wasn't the only dish that diners were gushing over in the McDaniel College cafeteria last week. Richards and Boutilier joined hundreds of other people who flooded the Englar Dining Hall during an Iron Chef Competition.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 2007
Those bags of prepacked greens aren't just for salads. Some lend themselves to form the base of nutritious and delicious dressings for salads and sandwiches. Here, we're combining baby arugula and using its peppery flavor with the oniony tang of chives and orange juice. The beauty of these bold ingredients is that you can substitute low-fat mayonnaise for the full-fat variety and not miss a beat of flavor. Because we squeezed a fresh navel orange to supply our juice quotient, we decided to use the rest of the fruit as a garnish.
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