Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAruba
IN THE NEWS

Aruba

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 18, 2007
Deflating experience. Sidney Ponson was nowhere to be seen in Aruba on Friday night, though it's important to point out that I'm referring to the popular nightspot on Fort Lauderdale beach and not the Caribbean island that brought you Sir Sidney and fellow former Orioles Eugene Kingsale, Calvin Maduro and Radhames Dykhoff. It's a fun place. If you're waiting for a table, they give you a balloon on a string with a number written on it so they can find you in the crowd, which I thought was kind of cool until someone in our party suggested that the restaurant could save a balloon by writing the number on my giant head.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By TONI STROUD SALAMA and TONI STROUD SALAMA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 12, 2006
KRALENDIJK, Bonaire, Dutch Antilles -- I was taking what seemed like a country back road, dodging wide puddles left by the previous day's downpour. The scenery included barbed wire, prickly pears and darned if there wasn't a windmill rising above the scrub. It was the typical springtime drive in Central Texas -- except that I was on Bonaire. There was a similar moment on Curacao, where the rural vegetation coagulated in a weird coming-together of Baja cactus and Yucatan jungle so thick only lizards can penetrate it. Over on Aruba -- which is the most well-known of these three islands -- the landscape struck me very much like Southern Arizona, except for the brilliant blue of the Caribbean.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 14, 2005
When Sidney Ponson hit a judge and went to jail last winter, I was dispatched to Aruba to check things out. Someone had to do it. The trail led me to a jail in a touristy neighborhood called Noord where Ponson spent most of his 11 days behind bars. It wasn't exactly a hard-time hellhole. The one-story building was small, quiet, clean. A beach was a half-mile away. Palm trees fluttered nearby. A watch commander at the front desk smiled and said "all the guys in the back" liked Ponson, as if they were frat brothers.
TRAVEL
November 13, 2005
Hard-hat special in California The final stage of renovation at the Oaks at Ojai Spa in Ojai, Calif., brings with it a hard-hat special of 20 percent off room rates starting at $135 a night (normally $169) until Dec. 16. Although three daily spa meals are included, spa services are extra. Taxes of 10 percent and a service charge of 14 percent are also extra. For more information: 800-753-6257; oaksspa.com. Los Angeles Times Aruba deal includes airfare Aruba is recovering from negative publicity that followed the disappearance of a young American woman in May. Through the end of December, Renaissance Aruba Resort & Casino has a rate of $1,007 for a five-night stay, including airfare from BWI. Guests get a complimentary room upgrade at the Marina Hotel, plus a $100 food and beverage voucher.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005
Jean and Jim Baker, of College Park, MD and Ronald Wilkins, of Balt., MD, announce the marriage of their daughter Odyssey, to Joshua Johnson, son of Mildred and the late Robert Johnson, of Baltimore, MD, on August 6, 2005. The couple will honeymoon in Aruba.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 8, 2005
PITTSBURGH - The search for a missing Alabama teenager in Aruba may seem to some like it's going on a world away from the Orioles' clubhouse, but not to Sidney Ponson. The disappearance of Natalee Holloway has focused international attention on Ponson's home island, which depends heavily on its reputation as a safe, friendly vacation getaway to support its 72,000 citizens. Ponson said yesterday that his first concern is the safety of the young woman who vanished May 30, and he checks in daily with family, friends and police contacts in Aruba to keep up on the situation.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The first spring training start for Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson lasted three innings. That much was planned. The unexpected came when Ponson was moved to a back field, where he faced teammates in a simulated game. In a surprising development, the Orioles were notified yesterday by the commissioner's office that Ponson couldn't make his Grapefruit League debut because he hadn't obtained the work visa that allows him to pitch in games where admission is charged.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - With a cup of coffee in his hand and the usual mischievous grin on his face, Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson was back in his element. He returned to camp yesterday knowing that the worst was behind him, that he wouldn't serve any more jail time related to his Christmas Day arrest in Aruba. He could begin concentrating on baseball again, just as he has tried to do since the start of spring training. A judge postponed the assault case on Thursday, giving Ponson until May to reach an out-of-court settlement.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Though he has no intention of shunning his homeland, Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson can't possibly view the island of Aruba in quite the same way. Not after being detained by police for 11 days, scrutinized by the locals since he was a child. Not when his instincts keep telling him to look over his shoulder. Unable to address specifics of the Christmas Day fight that led to his arrest before his scheduled hearing on March 3, Ponson said after yesterday's workout that he plans on returning to Aruba for occasional visits.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | January 18, 2005
ORANJESTAD, Aruba - Chu Halabi wheeled his SUV into a parking space near his chiropractor's office one morning last week. "Got to get my back whacked before I leave town," the Orioles' longtime Aruban scout said. He was headed for Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where he would stay with Orioles pitcher Sidney Ponson, whom Halabi signed years ago and still counsels. His job was to attach himself to Ponson, who was recently detained for 11 days in Aruba after a beach fight. Parenting Ponson meant Halabi also would be catching Ponson during some of the pitcher's workouts before spring training.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.