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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 2004
It takes a certain nerve to name an orchestra after Arturo Toscanini, the iconic Italian conductor who dominated the classical-music world during the first half of the 20th century, setting the gold standard for technical precision and expressive fire. But it became clear early on during its U.S. debut Monday night at the Kennedy Center that the Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini has earned the right to bear such a venerable title. The orchestra is a recent venture of the Toscanini Foundation, based in the same Emilia- Romagna region where Toscanini was born.
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December 20, 2004
The soprano Renata Tebaldi, one of the most beloved opera singers of all time - Arturo Toscanini, hard to please, said she had "the voice of an angel" - died yesterday in the Republic of San Marino, her doctor said. She was 82. At her best, in roles like Puccini's Mimi and Tosca and Verdi's Desdemona and Alice Ford, Tebaldi was a singer of overwhelming expressivity and matchless vocal allure; arguably, hers was the most sumptuously beautiful lirico-spinto soprano voice (one combining lighter lyrical and weightier dramatic qualities)
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By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 1997
FORMER ANNE Arundel resident Michael Impellizzeri has moved from amateur shutterbug to professional photographer with the self-publication of his book, "Impressions of the Natural World: An Inspirational Journey."The book contains 64 outdoor photos taken from Maryland to Yellowstone National Park.Each is accompanied by a quotation."There's no political message except that we have a beautiful country out there," said Impellizzeri.He lived in Anne Arundel for 25 years before he moved to Florida last year after retiring from the federal Department of Transportation.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 2004
It takes a certain nerve to name an orchestra after Arturo Toscanini, the iconic Italian conductor who dominated the classical-music world during the first half of the 20th century, setting the gold standard for technical precision and expressive fire. But it became clear early on during its U.S. debut Monday night at the Kennedy Center that the Filarmonica Arturo Toscanini has earned the right to bear such a venerable title. The orchestra is a recent venture of the Toscanini Foundation, based in the same Emilia- Romagna region where Toscanini was born.
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By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1994
British maestro John Eliot Gardiner found a dictionary that defines the word "conductor" as "a current passed from one sphere to another."While that definition comes from physics, Mr. Gardiner maintains it's an apt way to characterize the person who stands in front of an orchestra and, through various bodily gyrations, gets that orchestra to produce musical sounds.Mr. Gardiner makes his observation in "The Art of Conducting: Great Conductors of the Past," a splendid video just released on the Teldec label.
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December 20, 2004
The soprano Renata Tebaldi, one of the most beloved opera singers of all time - Arturo Toscanini, hard to please, said she had "the voice of an angel" - died yesterday in the Republic of San Marino, her doctor said. She was 82. At her best, in roles like Puccini's Mimi and Tosca and Verdi's Desdemona and Alice Ford, Tebaldi was a singer of overwhelming expressivity and matchless vocal allure; arguably, hers was the most sumptuously beautiful lirico-spinto soprano voice (one combining lighter lyrical and weightier dramatic qualities)
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By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 4, 1998
The Walters Art Gallery has received four grants, totaling $840,000, from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Getty Grant Program and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.The grants are earmarked to support ancient and medieval art collections at the Walters."While public funding for the arts continues to be the subject of much scrutiny, these resources are invaluable for the Walters to uphold its vital role in the national cultural community," said Walters director Gary Vikan.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2000
Usually, when the soloist walks onto the stage to perform a concerto, the conductor is already at the podium, waiting. But when pianist Andras Schiff takes the stage with the Baltimore Symphony this evening, to perform concertos by Beethoven and Bach, there will be no one waiting at the podium. In fact, there won't even be a podium, because Schiff will be conducting the orchestra himself, from the keyboard. "It is uncommon, yes," says the pianist. At least, it's uncommon today. But when these pieces were written, it was expected that the orchestra leader would also be the soloist.
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By Rip Rense and Rip Rense,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Michael Bolton contorts his way through a new album ofoperatic arias. Aretha Franklin struggles through Puccini's "Nessun Dorma" at the Grammy Awards. The Three Tenors are && almost as popular as Elvis.Opera is no longer longhair (or blue hair) music. At sellout performances across the country, Verdi and Leoncavallo are often the hottest dates in town. And the matinee idol/tenor who first made operatic singing a hot date with mass audiences 48 years ago -- Mario Lanza -- seems to be making a comeback.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 25, 1999
Who was the greatest American composer of the 20th century? Some would say it was Aaron Copland, who evoked the American landscape as vividly in music as John Ford did in film. Others would argue that it was Charles Ives, who composed music unlike anything heard before or since. Still others would strike up the band for George Gershwin, who brought the blues to symphony hall.Yet as admirable as those men were, another composer towers over them: Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington, who was born in Washington 100 years ago this Thursday.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 17, 2000
Usually, when the soloist walks onto the stage to perform a concerto, the conductor is already at the podium, waiting. But when pianist Andras Schiff takes the stage with the Baltimore Symphony this evening, to perform concertos by Beethoven and Bach, there will be no one waiting at the podium. In fact, there won't even be a podium, because Schiff will be conducting the orchestra himself, from the keyboard. "It is uncommon, yes," says the pianist. At least, it's uncommon today. But when these pieces were written, it was expected that the orchestra leader would also be the soloist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,sun pop music critic | April 25, 1999
Who was the greatest American composer of the 20th century? Some would say it was Aaron Copland, who evoked the American landscape as vividly in music as John Ford did in film. Others would argue that it was Charles Ives, who composed music unlike anything heard before or since. Still others would strike up the band for George Gershwin, who brought the blues to symphony hall.Yet as admirable as those men were, another composer towers over them: Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington, who was born in Washington 100 years ago this Thursday.
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By Rip Rense and Rip Rense,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Michael Bolton contorts his way through a new album ofoperatic arias. Aretha Franklin struggles through Puccini's "Nessun Dorma" at the Grammy Awards. The Three Tenors are && almost as popular as Elvis.Opera is no longer longhair (or blue hair) music. At sellout performances across the country, Verdi and Leoncavallo are often the hottest dates in town. And the matinee idol/tenor who first made operatic singing a hot date with mass audiences 48 years ago -- Mario Lanza -- seems to be making a comeback.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 4, 1998
The Walters Art Gallery has received four grants, totaling $840,000, from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Getty Grant Program and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.The grants are earmarked to support ancient and medieval art collections at the Walters."While public funding for the arts continues to be the subject of much scrutiny, these resources are invaluable for the Walters to uphold its vital role in the national cultural community," said Walters director Gary Vikan.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 1997
FORMER ANNE Arundel resident Michael Impellizzeri has moved from amateur shutterbug to professional photographer with the self-publication of his book, "Impressions of the Natural World: An Inspirational Journey."The book contains 64 outdoor photos taken from Maryland to Yellowstone National Park.Each is accompanied by a quotation."There's no political message except that we have a beautiful country out there," said Impellizzeri.He lived in Anne Arundel for 25 years before he moved to Florida last year after retiring from the federal Department of Transportation.
FEATURES
By John Guinn and John Guinn,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 13, 1994
British maestro John Eliot Gardiner found a dictionary that defines the word "conductor" as "a current passed from one sphere to another."While that definition comes from physics, Mr. Gardiner maintains it's an apt way to characterize the person who stands in front of an orchestra and, through various bodily gyrations, gets that orchestra to produce musical sounds.Mr. Gardiner makes his observation in "The Art of Conducting: Great Conductors of the Past," a splendid video just released on the Teldec label.
NEWS
May 25, 1993
Mieczyslaw Horszowski, 100, a Polish-born pianist who played with conductor Arturo Toscanini and made numerous recordings with cellist Pablo Casals, died at home Saturday night of old age. Mr. Horszowski, who would have been 101 on Sunday, joined the Curtis Institute as a teacher in 1942, and counted Peter Serkin, Ruth Laredo and Eugene Istomin among his former students.
NEWS
August 23, 1998
Wanda Toscanini Horowitz, 90, conductor Arturo Toscanini's daughter who nurtured and guarded her husband, Vladimir Horowitz, through his legendary but turbulent career as a piano virtuoso, died Friday in her Manhattan home.Juanita Kidd Stout, 79, who became the first black woman elected judge in the nation when she won a seat on the Philadelphia Municipal Court in 1959, died Friday of leukemia. She also became the first black woman to serve on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, and had been a music teacher before pursuing a law career.
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