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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
The Maryland State Arts Council has awarded $5.26 million in matching grants to Maryland arts organizations for fiscal year 1995.More than 200 small and mid-sized arts organizations in the state received grants totaling $1.99 million, while county arts councils were awarded $1.26 million in funding. Seven of the state's largest arts organizations -- the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Walters Art Gallery, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Center Stage, the Baltimore Opera Company, Olney Theatre and the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art -- received a total of about $3.3 million.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2014
The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance on Friday introduced CultureFly.org, a new site to promote Baltimore-area arts organizations. The site features event, attraction and dining listings, recommendations and discounts. It's scalable to various user devices and uses geolocation and intuitive search functions. "Baltimore has an exciting and growing number of cultural events for residents and visitors alike," executive director Jeannie Howe said in a news release. "As the region's unified voice for the arts and creative community, we wanted to help people navigate through the evolving Baltimore arts scene and discover new cultural experiences.
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith | February 5, 1992
Two years ago, Maryland arts organizations gathered in Annapolis to celebrate a proposed $2.4 million increase in the state's budget for the arts -- and lobby successfully for its passage. Many months of recession later, 650 arts advocates are meeting today to remind legislators that the arts are still very much alive in Maryland -- and to share their survival strategies."Arts organizations are trying to get leaner and meaner," says Sue Hess, director of Maryland Citizens for the Arts, which organizes the biennial Arts Day.The daylong program at St. John's College includes discussions on increasing earned income and forging partnerships with other non-profits, a move which can build audiences and cut office overhead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 6, 1991
A year ago, arts advocates from around Maryland were imbued with a sense of mission as they lobbied members of the General Assembly to approve a $2.4 million increase in state arts funding proposed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.This year, they are filled with a mixture of hope and apprehension about whether that hard-fought increase, which allowed the state to fund nearly 10 percent of the operating costs of qualifying organizations, will be sustained during a time of economic decline."We are hoping basically to hold the increase that we got last year," says Sue Hess, chairwoman of Maryland Citizens for the Arts, the statewide lobbying group that made the 1990 boost its cause celebre.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
Sixteen Howard County arts organizations were awarded dTC more than $186,000 in grants from the state Arts Council for projects and operating costs, state officials announced yesterday.In a morning ceremony in Annapolis, officials from Gov. Parris N. Glendening's office awarded nearly $7 million to 275 arts organizations statewide.In Howard, the biggest grant -- $53,014 -- goes to the county Arts Council to help keep its offices running and for such projects as an artists-in-residence program that pays for artists to work with students in county schools.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
Baltimore cultural organizations large and small have taken the wraps off plans for a citywide festival next winter celebrating Russian arts of all sorts - music, dance, painting, theater and film. There may even be borscht. Pegged to the 300th anniversary of the city considered Russia's cultural capital, Vivat! St. Petersburg represents an unprecedented cooperative effort by Baltimore's arts organizations to stage an event tailored to put the city under a national spotlight. "We need to realize we are major league, we can play in the major leagues," said Carroll R. Armstrong, president and chief executive of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
In a holiday season that celebrates giving, Maryland's nonprofit arts organizations have been playing their part. Not only do they inspire and enrich our lives in innumerable ways large and small, they're also an important source of economic vitality and innovation for the communities they serve. Earlier this month the Maryland State Arts Council, which tracks revenue and attendance figures at the state's 244 arts groups and programs, reported that in 2011 arts organizations generated a total of $518 million in direct spending by presenters and audiences and created more than 11,000 jobs.
NEWS
March 22, 1998
An article last week in the Howard County edition of The Sun incorrectly stated that arts organizations in Baltimore supported by the Howard County Arts Council would receive funds raised by the Celebration of the Arts in Howard County gala. The money will benefit only county arts organizations.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/22/98
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | April 6, 1992
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra received almost half the money -- $232,000 of a total $517,000 -- the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) granted 17 Maryland artists and arts organizations in its latest round of grants.The BSO received $227,000 to support its celebrity, favorites and casual series and another $5,000 to support the work of its chorus.Among Baltimore arts organizations that received grants were:Maryland Arts Place ($10,000), School 33 Art Center ($12,5000), Walters Art Gallery ($20,000)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Last year, Elm Creative Arts School in Milwaukee failed to live up to its name. A gallery for student artwork had become a storage area and meeting space. The performance space, dubbed the "great room" with theater-style seating, was used as an alternative route to cut down on hallway traffic. The only arts class students regularly attended was dance. The school's divergence from its mission reflected a time that Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton says students across Milwaukee's public schools were being "starved" of an educational staple.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Lord and Lady Crawley, the Earl and Countess of Grantham, made an appearance. So did their daughters, the ladies Mary, Edith and Sybil, along with Carson, the butler, and assorted lady's maids, valets and footmen. When fans of "Downton Abbey" were invited to masquerade as their favorite character on the hit television series, 500 people showed up at the Gordon Center for Performing Arts, dressed from haute to humble. On a wintry afternoon in February, Randi Benesch sat in her office at the Jewish Community Center Owings Mills and talked about the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Deborah F. Rutter, president of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association for the past decade, has been named president of the Kennedy Center, effective Sept. 1, 2014. She will succeed Michael M. Kaiser. As top administrator for one of the world's greatest orchestras, Rutter is a major figure in the performing arts world. The Chicago Symphony has enjoyed substantial growth in fundraising and ticket sales during her tenure. Rutter also succeeded in getting eminent Italian conductor Riccardo Muti to accept the job as the orchestra's music director.  "The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is in a great place -- musically, financially, the artistic leadership, and from an audience perspective," Rutter said in an interview Tuesday.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
In a holiday season that celebrates giving, Maryland's nonprofit arts organizations have been playing their part. Not only do they inspire and enrich our lives in innumerable ways large and small, they're also an important source of economic vitality and innovation for the communities they serve. Earlier this month the Maryland State Arts Council, which tracks revenue and attendance figures at the state's 244 arts groups and programs, reported that in 2011 arts organizations generated a total of $518 million in direct spending by presenters and audiences and created more than 11,000 jobs.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 17, 2012
Baltimore City has been chosen as the next school district to receive a comprehensive arts-education program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the organization and city officials announced Monday. The program, "Any Given Child," will create a long-range arts education plan for Baltimore students in grades kindergarten through eight, and will be tailored specially for Baltimore city students by incorporating resources from city schools and other local arts organizations, according to a release.  The Kennedy Center will begin devising Baltimore's plan--which aims to have little administrative costs by partnering with renowned arts organizations and the local Arts Every Day program--with a comprehensive audit of arts education in city schools, which its consultants will conduct in the next six to nine months.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 23, 2012
Editor: How interesting that The Aegis chose to publish Allan Vought's Aug. 3, commentary, "My string quartet salon vs. your turf field" in the Sports section, pitting the arts against athletics. As the Executive Director of the Center for the Arts and a former Harford County Public Schools physical education teacher and former coach of both field and individual sports, it is very shortsighted that a community as vibrant and educated as Harford County has to choose between the two. Or perhaps, since their earlier objections to the arts center have proven false, The Aegis was just trying another tactic to defeat the arts center by raising the ire of sports fans and parents by inventing a battle.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
An article last week in the Howard County edition of The Sun incorrectly stated that arts organizations in Baltimore supported by the Howard County Arts Council would receive funds raised by the Celebration of the Arts in Howard County gala. The money will benefit only county arts organizations.The Sun regrets the error.The first Celebration of the Arts in Howard County gala netted about $50,000 for local arts organizations and Columbia's Jim Rouse Theatre for the Performing Arts, organizers estimate.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer Staff writers J. Wynn Rousuck and John Dorsey contributed to this story | July 31, 1992
Roughly 175 arts organizations in Maryland will receive half of the annual state grants they expected to get this month with the remainder postponed until January, according to the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development.Uncertainty about the state's financial resources forced DEED to postpone payment of the funding not only to arts organizations but also to county and city employment and training agencies, to economic development organizations and to the World Trade Center Institute, which provides educational programs about different cultures to the business community.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 30, 2011
Nancy Marie Haragan, founding executive director of the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance, died Sunday of metastatic melanoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Canton resident was 60. "Reflecting on all she's done for the arts community made me realize how transformative Nancy was. She was able to bring the arts community together in a collaborative effort and get them to sit around the same table," said Doreen Bolger, director of the Baltimore Museum of Art and a longtime friend.
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