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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
In the hopes of eventually applying its arts initiative throughout the school system, Anne Arundel County has hired what officials say is one of the first arts integration specialists in the state. The approach, which applies arts-related teaching to all subjects, is in its third year. Susan Riley, who launched the program at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Howard County, became the arts integration specialist this school year. She said that this year, Anne Arundel County's five elementary schools that offer arts integration — Arnold, Crofton Woods, Germantown, Lake Shore and Riviera Beach — will focus heavily on its math component.
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By Yagana Shah, Capital News Service | April 4, 2013
Imagine a classroom where math is taught through the works of Matisse and reading is learned through a dramatic skit instead of a textbook. That's the scenario at several Anne Arundel County public schools that use the practice of arts integration. "Arts integration strategy gets students to work with creativity. It gives them a chance to work with critical thinking," said Suzanne Owens, a visual arts coordinator for AACPS, where administrators believe a fusion of arts and core objectives gives students a better — and longer-lasting — learning experience.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
The arts are not dying in public schools, or at least not in Howard County. Instead, they're being infused into language arts, social studies, math and science, breathing new life into those subjects while offering students a new approach to learning. The approach is called arts integration, and it is reaping dividends at several Howard County schools, particularly those at the elementary level. In using art, dance, drawing and painting in other class settings, teachers say they are improving students' retention and grasp of subject matter.
NEWS
By Mike McGrew | September 4, 2012
One dreary spring morning, I entered Robert Moton Elementary as opera resounded through its halls, stirring my soul like never before. As a school psychologist with limited exposure to classical genres, I was startled but tremendously invigorated by this music. I then noticed some students bopping down the halls — also seemingly uplifted. I immediately sought out the assistant principal, a former music teacher who selects Moton's morning melodies, begging him to identify this inspiring music.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
Sabrina Hooper knelt on one knee, holding her arms out like wings. Two of her classmates squatted on the floor and looked up at her. They stayed frozen in a tableau - a dramatic concept the sixth-graders at Wiley H. Bates Middle School in Annapolis are learning about in language arts class. "Scene!" said Patricia Watkins, giving the students the cue to drop their poses. Watkins asked the class earlier this week to guess which scene the three students were depicting from the book Wings, by Christopher Myers.
NEWS
By Yagana Shah, Capital News Service | April 4, 2013
Imagine a classroom where math is taught through the works of Matisse and reading is learned through a dramatic skit instead of a textbook. That's the scenario at several Anne Arundel County public schools that use the practice of arts integration. "Arts integration strategy gets students to work with creativity. It gives them a chance to work with critical thinking," said Suzanne Owens, a visual arts coordinator for AACPS, where administrators believe a fusion of arts and core objectives gives students a better — and longer-lasting — learning experience.
NEWS
By Mike McGrew | September 4, 2012
One dreary spring morning, I entered Robert Moton Elementary as opera resounded through its halls, stirring my soul like never before. As a school psychologist with limited exposure to classical genres, I was startled but tremendously invigorated by this music. I then noticed some students bopping down the halls — also seemingly uplifted. I immediately sought out the assistant principal, a former music teacher who selects Moton's morning melodies, begging him to identify this inspiring music.
NEWS
By Barbara Hall | June 23, 2009
Can you name the beginning solo instrument in George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"? Identify the style of visual art called Surrealism? Draw a self-portrait and explain the "memory of place" you used in drawing it? A federal report on the state of U.S. arts education, issued last week, could help assure that Maryland students can ace these and similar questions by the time they reach eighth grade. But progress depends on a willingness by state educators, government officials and parents to view the report as a long-awaited opportunity, not merely as a data-laden critique.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Some Anne Arundel County teachers will be learning songwriting, mime and dance this summer, in efforts to better teach students in math, science and other subjects in the fall. They will be teaming up with local artists as well as with teachers from abroad at the 21st Century Learning Institute, a summer development program that allows county elementary and middle school teachers to take arts lessons then devise ways to integrate those disciplines in all subjects. The program will be held at Bates Middle School in Annapolis from July 19-23, and will involve daily hands-on workshops with local talents — including recording artists, theatre actors, and visual artists.
NEWS
svanessen2@hotmail.com | January 29, 2014
First-grade students at Halstead Academy and Pleasant Plains Elementary schools are eagerly awaiting a field trip to the Meyerhoff in February where they will see a performance of "Carnival of Animals. " Their excitement might be intensified by reports of the kindergartners from both schools who attended a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performance of "The Snowman" December. The students were able to imagine a winter wonderland come to life in this story about a young boy's magical friendship with a snowman.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
In the hopes of eventually applying its arts initiative throughout the school system, Anne Arundel County has hired what officials say is one of the first arts integration specialists in the state. The approach, which applies arts-related teaching to all subjects, is in its third year. Susan Riley, who launched the program at Thunder Hill Elementary School in Howard County, became the arts integration specialist this school year. She said that this year, Anne Arundel County's five elementary schools that offer arts integration — Arnold, Crofton Woods, Germantown, Lake Shore and Riviera Beach — will focus heavily on its math component.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
The arts are not dying in public schools, or at least not in Howard County. Instead, they're being infused into language arts, social studies, math and science, breathing new life into those subjects while offering students a new approach to learning. The approach is called arts integration, and it is reaping dividends at several Howard County schools, particularly those at the elementary level. In using art, dance, drawing and painting in other class settings, teachers say they are improving students' retention and grasp of subject matter.
NEWS
By Barbara Hall | June 23, 2009
Can you name the beginning solo instrument in George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"? Identify the style of visual art called Surrealism? Draw a self-portrait and explain the "memory of place" you used in drawing it? A federal report on the state of U.S. arts education, issued last week, could help assure that Maryland students can ace these and similar questions by the time they reach eighth grade. But progress depends on a willingness by state educators, government officials and parents to view the report as a long-awaited opportunity, not merely as a data-laden critique.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
Sabrina Hooper knelt on one knee, holding her arms out like wings. Two of her classmates squatted on the floor and looked up at her. They stayed frozen in a tableau - a dramatic concept the sixth-graders at Wiley H. Bates Middle School in Annapolis are learning about in language arts class. "Scene!" said Patricia Watkins, giving the students the cue to drop their poses. Watkins asked the class earlier this week to guess which scene the three students were depicting from the book Wings, by Christopher Myers.
NEWS
July 27, 2008
St. John's raises $133.7 million St. John's College has raised $133.7 million through its capital campaign, more than tripling the amount raised in its previous campaign and significantly strengthening the college's endowment, college officials announced Thursday. "With a Clear and Single Purpose: The Campaign for St. John's College" has raised money for financial aid, new buildings on the Annapolis and Santa Fe., N.M., campuses, increased salaries and improved student services. The campaign began its public phase in April 2006.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 27, 2008
The High School Musical craze that has swept the nation has found its way to Running Brook Elementary School. This month, 50 fourth- and fifth-graders at the school performed the stage production of the Emmy Award-winning television movie. The performances topped off an eight-week drama class at the school. The class was subsidized - students had to pay $25 instead of the usual $185 fee - with money from the Columbia Center for Theatrical Arts, BRIDGES Over Howard County, Target and Howard Bank.
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