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By Eric Siegel | September 18, 1991
Saying he was "sending out a signal that the arts community needs help," Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday announced the formation of a blue-ribbon panel to find new sources of funding for the state's cultural institutions.The governor portrayed the arts as a "vital industry" in Maryland that employs 12,000 people and attracts thousands of visitors. But he warned that the arts' positive economic impact would be blunted unless new approaches for raising money could be found in an era of declining corporate profits and mounting state deficits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
With a riot of color onstage, Washington National Opera's presentation of "The Magic Flute" could not be more visually animated if it tried. There's a good deal to entertain the ears as well. This co-production with four other companies is, above all, a showcase for Japanese-born, Omaha-based artist Jun Kaneko. His set and costume design, a kind of pop art/classic Asian fusion, gives Mozart's opera a fresh flash of fantasy, not to mention whimsy. If there are times when the stylized look seems arbitrary (many of the projections suggest a digital Etch A Sketch)
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By Eric Siegel * | May 29, 1991
Res MusicAmerica, a principal local presenter of contemporary music during the last 11 years, will not present a concert series next season because of cutbacks in private and government funding for the arts.The organization, which had an annual budget of about $40,000, found it "extremely difficult" to get corporate funding in the current recession, administrator Nancy Hoffman said yesterday. At the same time, Ms. Hoffman said, foundation and government support was declining. She cited a recent grant from the National Endowment for the Arts of $6,200, down from $10,000 the year before.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
Netflix's Capitol Hill drama "House of Cards" may receive millions more in tax credits to continue filming in Maryland, now that the General Assembly has agreed to make more funding available. But the local arts community may not like the politics. To secure the extra funding, the General Assembly authorized state economic developers to dip into a $2.5 million pot of money called the Special Fund for the Preservation of Cultural Arts. It was created in 2009 to support arts organizations.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1996
Asking financially strapped suburbs for money is delicate stuff for city arts institutions. So when the folks from the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra came calling to the Howard County Council this week, they brought more than a third-chair violinist.And so it was that the Howard council greeted Monday a certain high-profile lobbyist, William Donald Schaefer, the former governor and Baltimore mayor.Howard officials jokingly called him a "high-powered lobbyist." That drew from Mr. Schaefer what can only be called a loud scoff.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Craig Timberg contributed to this article | August 15, 1998
Four years ago, Republican gubernatorial candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey proposed cuts in what she said were nonessential state grants to arts organizations to help pay for the major income tax cut she was pushing.Now in her second run for the State House, Sauerbrey has written to Maryland arts groups promising to "make every effort" to significantly increase state funding for their groups if she is elected in November.The reversal on arts funding is more evidence of Sauerbrey's attempt to recast herself politically, away from her conservatism of 1994 and toward the Maryland mainstream, say backers of Gov. Parris N. Glendening, her likely opponent in the November general election.
NEWS
By Roll Call Report Syndicate | September 22, 1991
Here is how members of Maryland's delegation on Capitol Hill were recorded on important roll-call votes last week:YES N: NO X: NOT VOTINGHOUSE: TO EXTEND JOBLESS BENEFITSBy a vote of 283 for and 125 against, the House approved up to 20 weeks of additional unemployment benefits for those who have used up their initial allotment of at least 26 weeks. The bill (HR 3040), which was sent to the Senate, has a price tag of $6.3 billion. A yes vote was to pass the bill.Y N X MemberY * * Bentley, Helen Delich, R-2ndY * * Byron, Beverly B., D-6thY * * Cardin, Benjamin L., D-3rdY * * Gilchrest, Wayne T., R-1stY * * Hoyer, Steny H. D-5thY * * McMillen, Tom, D-4thY * * Mfume, Kweisi, D-7thY * * Morella, Constance A., R-8thHOUSE: TO FUND JOBLESS BENEFITSBy a vote of 65 for and 341 against, the House rejected an amendment to fund the $6.3 billion jobless benefits measure by a tax increase on employers if President Bush fails to declare the expenditure exempt from the 1990 budget act. A yes vote was to pay for the added jobless benefits with higher taxes on employers.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | January 6, 1991
A year ago, arts advocates from around Maryland were imbued with a sense of mission as they lobbied members of the General Assembly to approve a $2.4 million increase in state arts funding proposed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.This year, they are filled with a mixture of hope and apprehension about whether that hard-fought increase, which allowed the state to fund nearly 10 percent of the operating costs of qualifying organizations, will be sustained during a time of economic decline."We are hoping basically to hold the increase that we got last year," says Sue Hess, chairwoman of Maryland Citizens for the Arts, the statewide lobbying group that made the 1990 boost its cause celebre.
NEWS
May 12, 1992
When the Hayden administration last winter forced out the knowledgeable, long-time director of Baltimore County's Arts and Sciences Commission, Lois Kahl Baldwin, arts advocates worried aloud that it could prove costly. For the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the bill may have just come due.The people who run the symphony were stunned last week to learn that County Executive Roger Hayden had slashed the county's appropriation to the BSO from $490,000 to $222,000, a 55 percent cut, while county arts grants were being cut just 27 percent overall.
NEWS
June 29, 1995
Someone who lives in the suburbs, works in the suburbs, shops in the suburbs may not feel much connection to or stake in Baltimore city. Even though study after study has shown a relationship between the health of the urban core and the outlying areas, the illusion of many suburbanites' lives -- and that includes two of every three people who live in the Baltimore vTC region now -- is that the city is inconsequential to them.In economic and cultural terms, proving the linkage may be complex.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
At Annapolis High School, student dancers and actors rehearse in an airy, two-story studio. Visual arts students fire their ceramic creations in a trio of kilns. Graphics students work in a lab filled with new computers with wide, flat-screen monitors. Film and production students fine-tune their creations on a mixing board worthy of a professional recording studio. For a few months now, students at Annapolis High - both those in a performing and visual arts magnet program and other students - have been exploring their creative talents in the school's new two-story addition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Drive west on Mile Lane in Allegany County, then crest the ridge in the road, and all of a sudden, the big barn on Leaning Pine Farm bursts out of the surrounding countryside like a display of fireworks. Eight-sided stars wheel exuberantly against the weathered boards in hues reflecting the natural surroundings: water blue and grass green, sunset orange and the brown of turned furrows. Passing motorists honk or slow down. A few get out to chat with artist Bill Dunlap, who is about a third of the way through a project to paint a large-scale mural on at least one barn in each of the state's 23 counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
The Hippodrome Theatre is largely defined by marquee Broadway shows, from "The Lion King" to "South Pacific. " But starting Monday, the theater aims to be a hub for local arts groups, becoming much more than just a stopping-off spot for touring artists and productions. With the Hippodrome Art Fund, the theater envisions being able to offer a bigger stage and financial support for nonprofit dance companies, music ensembles and more. Broadway Across America, the leaseholder of the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, which houses the Hippodrome , has contributed $300,000 to launch the effort.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
Bay Theatre scales new heights in its final production of the 2010-11 season with "Chesapeake," an enriching play that entertains audiences and, with an unforgettable one-man acting performance, redefines what a complete theater experience can become It's been a stellar season of firsts for Bay Theatre, which garnered a first-ever Helen Hayes recommendation for its opening production, "Lips Together, Teeth Apart," followed by a Helen Hayes Best...
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH | February 2, 2010
The "jobs, jobs, jobs" mantra in Washington also will be heard next week in Annapolis, but with a slightly different emphasis. On Feb. 9, the 12th annual Maryland Arts Day, organized by Maryland Citizens for the Arts (MCA) and MCA Foundation, will bring together about 500 people for a daylong session of energizing, strategizing and advocacy training. One message sure to be emphasized is the need, even in the midst of a state budget crunch and a national recession, to keep money flowing to the arts.
NEWS
By a Sun reporter | July 22, 2007
Howard County government has been recognized with a national award for its support of local arts and cultural organizations. The national, nonprofit Americans for the Arts, with the National Association of Counties, chose Howard County to receive its Award for County Arts Leadership. The award was established to recognize the role county government leaders play in funding, improving and ensuring the accessibility of arts programs. Howard County has consistently ranked as one of the top three in Maryland for per capita spending on operating funds for the arts and for providing a stable source of funding and significant in-kind services for local arts groups, according to the award announcement.
NEWS
By a Sun reporter | July 22, 2007
Howard County government has been recognized with a national award for its support of local arts and cultural organizations. The national, nonprofit Americans for the Arts, with the National Association of Counties, chose Howard County to receive its Award for County Arts Leadership. The award was established to recognize the role county government leaders play in funding, improving and ensuring the accessibility of arts programs. Howard County has consistently ranked as one of the top three in Maryland for per capita spending on operating funds for the arts and for providing a stable source of funding and significant in-kind services for local arts groups, according to the award announcement.
NEWS
May 11, 1994
Two years ago, in the jaws of the recession, the suburbs that ring Baltimore cut back -- or, in Anne Arundel County's case, cut out -- making their fair share contributions to cultural institutions that are based in the city, but that benefit the whole region. Now, with the economy brighter, suburban governments say they have restored their contributions to the Baltimore attractions that so many of their residents patronize.If only that were the whole truth.The suburbs have restored some of the cuts made during the recession, but their contributions are still way below 1990-'92 levels, when the counties as a group pledged to treat a dozen or so major city-based institutions as the regional jewels they are. All the counties sell city culture as an amenity to lure new %J business, yet the suburbs still seem to view these stipends more as goodwill gifts than as a responsibility to the region's educational and economic well-being.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
When Howard Community College officials approached the Columbia Association board of directors last spring for help in construction of the college's new performing and visual arts center, they got a mixed reception. Some board members favored a contribution, seeing it as a way to strengthen the community's relationship with the college and support the arts. But others worried that such generosity would add to the homeowner association's multi-million dollar debt. In the end, fiscal concerns took precedence as the association's governing body decided to turn down a proposed $200,000 contribution for the Peter & Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center.
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