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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
National Endowment for the Arts chairman Bill Ivey announced yesterday that he will resign in September, eight months before the four-year term he was appointed to by former President Bill Clinton ends. Ivey submitted his resignation in a letter to President Bush. The White House had not responded to the letter yesterday. "My hope is that by announcing now that I will step down at the end of this fiscal year, the new administration will be able to move efficiently to choose new leadership for the arts endowment," Ivey said in a statement.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
National Endowment for the Arts chairman Bill Ivey announced yesterday that he will resign in September, eight months before the four-year term he was appointed to by former President Bill Clinton ends. Ivey submitted his resignation in a letter to President Bush. The White House had not responded to the letter yesterday. "My hope is that by announcing now that I will step down at the end of this fiscal year, the new administration will be able to move efficiently to choose new leadership for the arts endowment," Ivey said in a statement.
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By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1995
Buried deep in an addendum to the Republican "Contract with America" is a pledge to cut more than $500 million from "all arts and humanities funding" in America in the next five years.And Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich wants to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, among others.But I have a feeling that when all the huffing and puffing is over, Big Bird and Barney will continue to get funded.The NEA, however, may not.And that is because Big Bird and Barney never cut themselves with razor blades, smear themselves with excrement or expose their private parts on stage.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Morgan State University has received the largest gift in its history - $1.5 million from a graduate of the class of 1967 that will begin a fine arts endowment for the school. The gift comes from James H. Gilliam Jr., a Baltimore native who lives in Wilmington, Del., where he works as a lawyer and financial consultant. "Morgan has played a significant role in the lives of the Gilliam family," Gilliam, whose father and sister are also Morgan graduates, said in a statement. "As a family, we truly believe in giving back to institutions that have made a difference, not only in our lives, but in the lives of others as well," the statement continued.
NEWS
By AMY L. BERNSTEIN | December 25, 1994
Act I, Scene 1. Jack steps before the judge to defend his reasons for stealing the goose that lays golden eggs from the Giant, who lives atop the Beanstalk. The judge listens patiently and soon, the Giant has a chance to explain why he felt entitled to eat Jack.This scenario belongs to a little morality play performed for tens of thousands of school children last year in Maryland, Virginia and Washington. The play contains no nudity, violence, or profanity. Its wholesome lesson on tolerance could hardly be called controversial.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Resigned to deep congressional budget cuts, the National Endowment for the Arts has laid off nearly half its staff and is looking to cities and states for innovative ways to support arts on a local level, the agency's director said yesterday.Jane Alexander, who as director is overseeing a sweeping change in the NEA's ambitions, said the agency is also changing the categories in which it will award grants, money that has been used to support organizations ranging from Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery to the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1993
The heads of the National Endowment for the Arts and of the National Endowment for the Humanities have stepped down and named their acting successors.Ana M. Steele, an NEA executive who has worked for the federal agency since its creation in 1965, has been named its acting chairwoman. Jerry Martin, an NEH executive who joined the agency in 1987, has been named its acting chairman.Both Ms. Steele and Mr. Martin are expected to serve in their new capacities only until President Clinton names a new chairman for each of the agencies, sources at the endowments said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 1993
The U.S. Department of Justice has appealed the decision by a federal judge in Los Angeles in June that declared unconstitutional the so-called decency standard, which required the National Endowment for the Arts to "take into consideration general standards of decency" when awarding grants.The action took many arts groups by surprise. Although the Bush administration had filed a notice of intent to appeal the decision, it was generally believed that the election of Bill Clinton had effectively killed the issue.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 11, 1994
Anxiety spread throughout the cultural world as the current lame-duck session of Congress moved toward its close in recent days. The Republicans who will dominate Congress have cast cold eyes on federal arts spending in the past."
NEWS
August 7, 1992
HERE ARE excerpts from an interview in The Ripon Forum with the ousted chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, John Frohnmayer. (The Ripon Society is a research and policy organization oriented to moderate and liberal Republicanism.)Q. Your successor, Anne-Imelda Radice, has said she thought the NEA might very well go down the tubes. If that did happen, what would be the cultural costs to the United States?A. Immense. Because one of the great successes of the arts endowment has been to create state arts agencies in every state and every territory, and there are almost 4,000 local arts agencies now, a whole bunch of presenters and a network of touring organizations and performers.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Were it all to unfold according to script, the curtain would soon be falling on the National Endowment for the Arts.Condemned as a tool of liberals and elitists and a champion of taxpayer-financed pornography, the arts endowment was a gleaming bull's-eye for the cost-cutting conservatives of the last Congress. Two years ago, Republican leaders vowed to wipe out any trace of it by this fall.But today, because of shifting political winds and an arts community that learned to campaign with sophistication and a sprinkling of stardust, the death scene hardly seems certain.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Resigned to deep congressional budget cuts, the National Endowment for the Arts has laid off nearly half its staff and is looking to cities and states for innovative ways to support arts on a local level, the agency's director said yesterday.Jane Alexander, who as director is overseeing a sweeping change in the NEA's ambitions, said the agency is also changing the categories in which it will award grants, money that has been used to support organizations ranging from Baltimore's Walters Art Gallery to the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society.
NEWS
By HIRAM W. WOODWARD Jr | March 22, 1995
Supporters of the National Endowment for the Arts hail its record of accomplishment in the promotion of diversity. Detractors repeat a few instances in which performance artists appearing at institutions that have received grants havecommitted acts that many consider offensive or outside ordinary definitions of art. Meanwhile the NEA pursues a steady course, supporting a range of activities that defy easy characterization.Its latest round of grants in Maryland included awards to institutions that support dance, jazz and theater performances, scholarly studies, educational initiatives and concerts, as well as to two individual writers.
NEWS
March 1, 1995
Some Republicans are seeking to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities to make the point the federal government has no business subsidizing the arts. That's a shortsighted argument. It ignores the enormous expansion of arts activities across the country made possible by the endowments since their founding 30 years ago.But the impact of such cuts would be hard to ignore. They would be felt by every arts groups in Maryland as well as museums, theater companies, dance troupes and orchestras throughout America.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 15, 1995
Buried deep in an addendum to the Republican "Contract with America" is a pledge to cut more than $500 million from "all arts and humanities funding" in America in the next five years.And Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich wants to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, among others.But I have a feeling that when all the huffing and puffing is over, Big Bird and Barney will continue to get funded.The NEA, however, may not.And that is because Big Bird and Barney never cut themselves with razor blades, smear themselves with excrement or expose their private parts on stage.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The National Endowment for the Arts is preparing to fight for survival as House Republican leaders take aim at its budget and challenge its very existence.The fight, likely to last throughout the year, turns on a fundamental question: What is the appropriate role of the federal government in financing the arts?"I would argue that it is not within the scope of Washington, not within the scope of the federal government, to be involved in funding arts activities around America," said Rep. John A. Boehner of Ohio, who is chairman of the Republican conference.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
Morgan State University has received the largest gift in its history - $1.5 million from a graduate of the class of 1967 that will begin a fine arts endowment for the school. The gift comes from James H. Gilliam Jr., a Baltimore native who lives in Wilmington, Del., where he works as a lawyer and financial consultant. "Morgan has played a significant role in the lives of the Gilliam family," Gilliam, whose father and sister are also Morgan graduates, said in a statement. "As a family, we truly believe in giving back to institutions that have made a difference, not only in our lives, but in the lives of others as well," the statement continued.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 9, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The National Endowment for the Arts is preparing to fight for survival as House Republican leaders take aim at its budget and challenge its very existence.The fight, likely to last throughout the year, turns on a fundamental question: What is the appropriate role of the federal government in financing the arts?"I would argue that it is not within the scope of Washington, not within the scope of the federal government, to be involved in funding arts activities around America," said Rep. John A. Boehner of Ohio, who is chairman of the Republican conference.
NEWS
By AMY L. BERNSTEIN | December 25, 1994
Act I, Scene 1. Jack steps before the judge to defend his reasons for stealing the goose that lays golden eggs from the Giant, who lives atop the Beanstalk. The judge listens patiently and soon, the Giant has a chance to explain why he felt entitled to eat Jack.This scenario belongs to a little morality play performed for tens of thousands of school children last year in Maryland, Virginia and Washington. The play contains no nudity, violence, or profanity. Its wholesome lesson on tolerance could hardly be called controversial.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 11, 1994
Anxiety spread throughout the cultural world as the current lame-duck session of Congress moved toward its close in recent days. The Republicans who will dominate Congress have cast cold eyes on federal arts spending in the past."
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