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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Last year, Elm Creative Arts School in Milwaukee failed to live up to its name. A gallery for student artwork had become a storage area and meeting space. The performance space, dubbed the "great room" with theater-style seating, was used as an alternative route to cut down on hallway traffic. The only arts class students regularly attended was dance. The school's divergence from its mission reflected a time that Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton says students across Milwaukee's public schools were being "starved" of an educational staple.
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NEWS
August 25, 2014
Harford County community leaders will showcase their ballroom dancing talents and compete for top honors to benefit the Center for the Arts on Saturday, Nov. 15 at the 7th annual Dancing for the Arts Fundraising Gala. Sponsored by the Center for the Arts, the gala is from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. at the Maryland Golf and Country Clubs. The dancing stars, many with no dance experience, are engaging in private dance lessons with the professional dance instructors from Dancing with Friends Dance Studio.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
A statewide arts education group has named Anne Arundel Schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell as its arts advocate for 2010, citing his creation of an arts magnet program at an Annapolis middle school and other arts-related initiatives. The Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance plans to honor Maxwell at a conference at Towson University on June 3. "Dr. Kevin Maxwell's commitment to arts education has resulted in vibrant learning [and] teaching environments that prepare Maryland's school children to think creatively, innovate, problem solve, collaborate, communicate and compete successfully in the 21st century global economy," the alliance said in a statement.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 16, 2014
Baltimore City Council President Bernard "Jack" Young is requesting that school officials brief city leaders on the extent to which students are receiving a "complete education" in their schools. Young will introduce a resolution Monday that seeks information about offerings like arts and physical education. In a release, Young said a lack of arts and physical education, or what he calls an "incomplete curriculum," has been a disservice to city students. “A focus on basic education that leaves arts education and physical education aside ignores the competencies demanded by the complex, modern world in which Baltimore City Public Schools students are expected to thrive,” Young said in a statement.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 17, 2012
Baltimore City has been chosen as the next school district to receive a comprehensive arts-education program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the organization and city officials announced Monday. The program, "Any Given Child," will create a long-range arts education plan for Baltimore students in grades kindergarten through eight, and will be tailored specially for Baltimore city students by incorporating resources from city schools and other local arts organizations, according to a release.  The Kennedy Center will begin devising Baltimore's plan--which aims to have little administrative costs by partnering with renowned arts organizations and the local Arts Every Day program--with a comprehensive audit of arts education in city schools, which its consultants will conduct in the next six to nine months.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Two Maryland schools are among five in the nation to be honored for excellence in arts education. Roland Park Elementary/Middle School in Baltimore City and Sudbrook Magnet Middle School in Baltimore County were named "national schools of distinction" Friday by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, according to a news release from the Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance. The award is presented annually to five public schools selected from around the country that have "made the arts an essential part of their students' education," the alliance said.
NEWS
December 14, 2004
MARYLAND HAS long been a leader in arts education. For 15 years now, it has required that students earn a credit in fine arts before receiving a high school diploma, recognizing the arts as an integral part of the academic experience as well as an essential part of life. Now the state is trying to be a leader in measuring how well students are doing in the arts. To do that, the state Department of Education needs some additional money next year to support its ongoing effort to develop a fine arts assessment for middle school students.
NEWS
By Barbara Hall | June 23, 2009
Can you name the beginning solo instrument in George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"? Identify the style of visual art called Surrealism? Draw a self-portrait and explain the "memory of place" you used in drawing it? A federal report on the state of U.S. arts education, issued last week, could help assure that Maryland students can ace these and similar questions by the time they reach eighth grade. But progress depends on a willingness by state educators, government officials and parents to view the report as a long-awaited opportunity, not merely as a data-laden critique.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | August 8, 1993
A new program to fund arts education in the schools, developed by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, the PHOENIX Repertory Dance Company and the Morton and Sophia Macht Foundation, will introduce elementary- and middle-school children to the art of dance.A grant of $7,100 from the Macht Foundation will enable PHOENIX to take professional dancers into six schools in southwest Baltimore this fall for assemblies and participatory sessions. It will also fund dance workshops for children at UMBC.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
The Baltimore Community Foundation has announced it will use its $1 million Arts and Culture Initiative to fund programs in arts education run collaboratively between arts organizations and schools. It recently awarded $100,000 to programs run collaboratively between five arts institutions and local schools.* The Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Foundation of Maryland received $15,000 to bring instructors to 30 area schools for two-day workshops and to develop additional activities for teachers and students.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
There's a very good reason Baltimore's incoming schools CEO, Gregory Thornton, worked so hard to restore music and art programs in the Milwaukee schools during his three-year tenure as superintendent there: Kids who learn to draw, dance, play an instrument or act on stage are more focused, get better grades and score higher on standardized tests than children who don't. To his credit, Mr. Thornton apparently never considered arts instruction an unnecessary "frill" that could be cut every time there's a budget shortfall but instead recognized it for what it is: A useful and effective teaching tool that should be an essential element of the school curriculum because it increases students' desire and capacity to learn.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Last year, Elm Creative Arts School in Milwaukee failed to live up to its name. A gallery for student artwork had become a storage area and meeting space. The performance space, dubbed the "great room" with theater-style seating, was used as an alternative route to cut down on hallway traffic. The only arts class students regularly attended was dance. The school's divergence from its mission reflected a time that Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton says students across Milwaukee's public schools were being "starved" of an educational staple.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
As Baltimore City public schools move into a new chapter with new leadership and embark on a major building campaign, the arts offer a unique opportunity to transform our schools. We thank the city commissioners for choosing a new CEO with a track record of supporting the arts ( "Welcome, Mr. Thornton," Feb. 19). The performing and visual arts build students' capacities for creativity and innovation. Research is clear that the arts heighten students' motivation and build their abilities in communication, collaboration and critical judgment.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Paul H. Trattner, a retired Baltimore public schools art educator and webmaster who was also a noted prestidigitator and popular Santa Claus, died Aug. 28 of heart failure at his Coldspring Newtown home. He was 70. "Paul was a kind, gentle person who was a great asset to the magic fraternity," said George Goebel, a veteran Baltimore illusionist who owns A.T. Jones & Sons, the Howard Street costumer. "He was a wonderful performer and had charisma. He was also a magnificent Santa Claus.
NEWS
By Michael McGuire | June 12, 2013
When they left me outside my freshman dorm in the fall of 2009, my parents told me I could do anything. It was a wonderful compliment, a sign of confidence that made me feel just a little less guilty for the substantial investment they were making for me in a private liberal arts education. But a month or so later, when I sat down with my adviser, I realized doing "anything" wasn't an option. I had to decide on something: a major. I needed to choose a path to follow for the rest of my time at Washington and Lee. A lot of my friends already knew what their something was, and they directed four years of classes and internships toward being investment bankers in New York City or campaign managers in Alabama.
NEWS
June 1, 2013
St. Mary's College alumni are currently aware of the "crisis" in admissions, which is unfortunate and reflects a number of factors, including the admissions strategy of the new college president as well as the changing nature and economics of higher education. While this situation works itself out they are right to express concern over St. Mary's future. However, to suggest, as commentator Anne D. Neal does, that St. Mary's does not deserve to survive because of the kind of education it offers or because its curriculum is somehow inadequate, reflects a serious misunderstanding of a public liberal arts education and what the college means to its students and alumni ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30)
NEWS
September 12, 1997
IT IS ONE THING to crack down on smoking in school lavatories, but in Howard County, they're talking about lowering the boom on music and art education in middle schools.Superintendent Michael E. Hickey makes a terrible mistake if he relents to pressure from some circles and sacrifices arts education in an overwrought, if well-intentioned, move to focus on math, language, social studies and science in middle schools.Pitting the core subjects against arts and music is a mistake. Why turn one positive education goal into the enemy of another positive education goal?
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | June 8, 2008
At the SEED School of Maryland, a tuition-free public boarding school for disadvantaged youngsters slated to open this summer in Southwest Baltimore, administrators and staff are working overtime to integrate art, music and theater into the regular academic curriculum. Some people still have a hard time with the idea that instruction in the arts is as essential to a well-rounded education as training in the liberal arts and sciences. Yet educators have known for decades that the arts play a crucial role in the development of young minds.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | September 17, 2012
Baltimore City has been chosen as the next school district to receive a comprehensive arts-education program from the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the organization and city officials announced Monday. The program, "Any Given Child," will create a long-range arts education plan for Baltimore students in grades kindergarten through eight, and will be tailored specially for Baltimore city students by incorporating resources from city schools and other local arts organizations, according to a release.  The Kennedy Center will begin devising Baltimore's plan--which aims to have little administrative costs by partnering with renowned arts organizations and the local Arts Every Day program--with a comprehensive audit of arts education in city schools, which its consultants will conduct in the next six to nine months.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
I was encouraged by Mike McGrew's recent commentary about the value of arts education, a topic that is close to my heart ("The value of arts in education," Sept. 5). It reminds me of a three-year stint I did at Glenmount Elementary School in Northeast Baltimore in the late 1990s as an arts specialist. At the time, I was a folk musician specializing in culturally diverse children's music, dance and singing games. Due to the tremendous insight of then-Principal Vera Newton, I was brought on part-time to help augment the K-4 curriculum using the arts (drama, music and folk arts/literature)
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