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NEWS
April 7, 2010
Last weekend, I visited Philadelphia and was charmed by their neighborhoods, museums and, especially, the section of Broad Street designated as the "Avenue of the Arts," with its many theaters and restaurants. Similarly designating the section of Howard Street, including the Everyman and Hippodrome theatres, will stimulate development, tourist traffic and more ("New arts district on way?" April 7). Its proximity to downtown hotels, sports venues and the University of Maryland professional schools and Medical Center will draw residents as well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
The Maryland Film Festival, which for the first time this year will not be showing the majority of its films at a single location, will have shuttles transporting moviegoers among its seven venues. Free shuttles will be running about every 10 minutes, festival director Jed Dietz said. The venues include the Maryland Institute College of Art Lazarus Graduate Studio Center, 131 W. North Ave.; the Windup Space, 12 W. North Ave.; University of Baltimore Business Center, 11 W. Mount Royal Ave.; UB Langsdale Auditorium, 1420 Maryland Ave. (entrance off Oliver Street)
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NEWS
May 8, 2012
Any effort that promises to attract new residents and businesses to a historic Baltimore neighborhood could do a lot worse than make the arts a magnet for bringing people together. That's why we can't see any down side to a city proposal to create a third arts and entertainment district for Baltimore, this one on the west side of downtown. If the idea of a new cultural destination works anywhere near as well there as it has elsewhere in the city and state, the results are practically guaranteed to be an improvement over the status quo. State economic development officials are expected to decide by June 1 whether to approve Baltimore's request to designate 117 acres of downtown as the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
In February, the Columbia Association took the bold move to endorse the Inner Arbor plan for Symphony Woods and to create the Inner Arbor Trust, Inc., setting in motion the creation of an iconic arts and culture park in Symphony Woods ( "CA vows to keep Symphony Woods name," March 25). The Columbia Association is partnering with Howard County and Merriweather Post Pavilion to develop the core of an arts district in downtown. As a lifelong Columbia resident, a proud graduate of the Howard County Public School System and mother of two children growing up in Columbia, I am committed to the ideals of Columbia.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 7, 2010
Baltimore's west side would become the city's third arts and entertainment district under a proposal endorsed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake for making the area more of a cultural hub. The new district would join state-designated arts districts in the Station North and Highlandtown areas as magnets for galleries, theaters, studios and other arts-related activities and investment. Such a designation also would make certain business and property owners eligible for tax breaks.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
The debate over the redevelopment of downtown Columbia has often focused on how to best utilize Symphony Woods, the park setting that includes Merriweather Post Pavilion and, even more importantly to many, some of the oldest trees in the Columbia downtown. To some, including County Executive Ken Ulman just this past week, this parcel represents the "centerpiece and lynchpin" for downtown Columbia's future development. With such great expectations for the property, there has been a great deal of debate on how to use the land.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 10, 2013
When Christa Daring was a student, she rode a bus from her Waverly home and crossed North Avenue on her way to classes at the Baltimore School for the Arts. "This was always oh-so no-man's land," she said of the commercial crosstown street that is taking some convincing steps this spring as an arts district. She stood in the old North Avenue Market building, where she and fellow members of the Red Emma's Bookstore and Coffeehouse collective will be moving from Mount Vernon to a much enlarged space.
EXPLORE
February 1, 2013
I am writing in support of the plan to transform Symphony Woods into an arts district. I am a life-long resident of Columbia, among the first generation to call Columbia my home town. As a child, my parents took me to the petting zoo that was in Symphony Woods. Now, I live in Owen Brown with my wife and children. This is an exciting plan, and it strikes an important balance. Putting the CA headquarters on-site provides a built-in user base for, well, every amenity in the park, from pathway to cafe.
EXPLORE
By Gwendolyn Glenn | June 6, 2012
There have been numerous open house events at the C Street Gallery, Venus Theatre Play Shack and other venues along C Street since the area was designated Laurel's official Arts District last year. In addition, members of the Laurel Arts District Committee have developed a blog and Facebook page to promote events on C Street, parts of Main Street and the few other blocks and alleys included in the arts district. Now, on June 9, committee members are taking an even bigger step to increase traffic in the Arts District by holding the first C Street Arts Festival, which they hope to make an annual event.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
The first of the 51/2-foot-tall fiberglass chickens roosts in a vacant lot beside an Annapolis restaurant, a tire's skid marks stretched across its belly and a set of X's for eyes. Apparently, the owners joke, it had trouble crossing the road. The next chicken might be a robot, a spectacle of glitter, the canvas for an underwater mural or, perhaps, a mosaic of crabs and sailboats for a twist on the classic Annapolis images the statues were designed to avoid. "If it was a boat or a fish, I wouldn't be into doing it. But a chicken is funny," artist Casey Johnson said as he surveyed Chicken Little and contemplated his own design.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | August 29, 2013
"There is a lot of history to this building," Mayor Craig Moe said last week as he stood in front of the vacant, soon-to-be-razed building that once housed a Safeway, City Hall and the Laurel Police Department. Moe was flanked by developers from Klingbeil Capital Management, the San Francisco-based company that plans to develop the 2-acre property at 350 Municipal Square into a mixed-use development that will bring 142 flat-style apartments into the city's designated arts district on C Street.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | August 22, 2013
Developers from Klingbeil Capital Management broke ground Thursday on a new mixed-use development that will bring 142 flat-style apartments into the city's designated arts district on C Street.  The apartments, which are expected to undergo full construction next month and be completed by September 2014, will be built at 350 Municipal Square; the former site of City Hall and the Laurel Police department.  "The vision for this property is to bring life and activity to Main Street," said Jim Callard, president of Klingbeil Capital Management.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
A recent Sun editorial linked the planned reopening of the Contemporary Museum with "newly designated arts districts. " including the Station North Arts & Entertainment District immediately north of Penn Station ("The Contemporary returns," July 8). In 1991, after I had leased the Charles Theatre as an "art film house" and was negotiating to lease the Everyman Theatre in the 1700 block of North Charles Street, I was contacted by Contemporary co-founder and director George Ciscle, requesting a rent-free exhibit in the former Famous Ballroom (now part of the expanded Charles Theatre )
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 10, 2013
When Christa Daring was a student, she rode a bus from her Waverly home and crossed North Avenue on her way to classes at the Baltimore School for the Arts. "This was always oh-so no-man's land," she said of the commercial crosstown street that is taking some convincing steps this spring as an arts district. She stood in the old North Avenue Market building, where she and fellow members of the Red Emma's Bookstore and Coffeehouse collective will be moving from Mount Vernon to a much enlarged space.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
The editorial cartoon in the Jan. 24 editor of the Columbia Flier, "Tuning up Symphony Woods," makes no clear statement, except one against its quality. The being pictured "tuning up" a music note lacks any features identifying as a creature of this planet. Its face lacks a mouth, eye or nose. It seems to be the end result of a gorilla-rat love affair. The unidentified species seems to be using a tuning fork to tune the contents of a musical note. This does not portray any coherent message at all. Is the Arts District trying to make all trees in Symphony Woods be in tune?
EXPLORE
February 1, 2013
I am writing in support of the plan to transform Symphony Woods into an arts district. I am a life-long resident of Columbia, among the first generation to call Columbia my home town. As a child, my parents took me to the petting zoo that was in Symphony Woods. Now, I live in Owen Brown with my wife and children. This is an exciting plan, and it strikes an important balance. Putting the CA headquarters on-site provides a built-in user base for, well, every amenity in the park, from pathway to cafe.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 2, 2001
ON NORTH Avenue, just east of Charles Street, Renwick Bass peered through the veil of Thursday's morning fog and saw what nobody else has been able to see in this neighborhood for years: potential. Around Labor Day, Bass opened a little shopping mall in the old Department of Social Services building, and in nearly three months, the biggest payday he's had is maybe $160 in business. "And this encourages you?" he was asked. "No," he said. "But we know the problems. People hear `North Avenue,' and they're afraid."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
In what could be a major boost to Baltimore's fledgling Station North Arts District, a team of Washington developers is planning to build a $12 million apartment complex on a vacant, block-long lot just south of North Avenue. The Penn Loft Apartments on North Calvert Street between Lafayette Avenue and Lanvale Street would be five stories tall and contain between 100 and 125 loft-style rental units, according to a preliminary plan developers presented to the city's Design Advisory Panel yesterday.
NEWS
January 29, 2013
The debate over the redevelopment of downtown Columbia has often focused on how to best utilize Symphony Woods, the park setting that includes Merriweather Post Pavilion and, even more importantly to many, some of the oldest trees in the Columbia downtown. To some, including County Executive Ken Ulman just this past week, this parcel represents the "centerpiece and lynchpin" for downtown Columbia's future development. With such great expectations for the property, there has been a great deal of debate on how to use the land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Early in the renovations at the former Town Theatre movie house on West Fayette Street, a member of the architectural firm was hoisted on a cherry picker and spotted something beneath the grime up at the top of the facade of the century-old building. It was a single capital letter: "E. " "Everybody got such a kick out of that," said architect Diane Cho of Cho Benn Holback + Associates. "It was very kismet. " That "E," left over from the first commercial establishment on that spot in 1911, a vaudeville house called the Empire Theatre, would fit just fine for the new owner - Everyman Theatre . This week, about 18 months after work on the $18 million renovation project started, Everyman, a 22-year-old professional Equity company with an admired corps of resident actors and designers, opens its new home to the public.
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