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November 29, 1990
Saturday marks "Day Without Art 1990," which celebrates the achievements of AIDS victims while mourning the losses in creative communities. It is a project of the New York-based group Visual AIDS.The Baltimore visual arts community will join the effort:* BAUhouse, 1713 N. Charles St., will sponsor "AIDS=AID," a monthlong exhibition of artwork from artists in the Mid-Atlantic region. ACT UP BALTO (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power -- Baltimore) will co-sponsor the show, which opens Saturday and runs through Dec. 31. The BAUhouse opening also features "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" by New York performance artist and writer David Drake.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2014
Dyane Fancey, a prominent poet in Baltimore's arts community who also worked in the city school system and at a popular Mount Vernon restaurant, died April 13 of heart failure. The Hampden resident was 63. Born Diane Margaret Fancey in Washington, D.C., Ms. Fancey was the daughter of active labor union workers, and developed a feisty and rebellious attitude at an early age, replacing the "i" in her name with a "y" in order to distinguish herself from the other girls in her high school who shared her name and dotted the "i" in their names with hearts.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
When Nancy Haragan was growing up in Louisville, Ky., she and her five siblings were introduced by their mother to a world in which the arts, civil rights, faith and civic responsibility merged into a way of life that left no possibility behind. They took painting classes at the library, saw the city come to terms with school integration, and met the women their mother taught at the Spalding University program she established for returning students. THE MARQUEE BALL / / 9 p.m. Saturday / / Creative Alliance at the Patterson / / 410-276-1651 or creativealliance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, a key venue in the blossoming Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District, is getting a new president with a history of sparking the redevelopment of an arts community. Ron Legler, president of the Florida Theatrical Association in Orlando and a former chairman of the Downtown Arts District in that city, will succeed Jeff Daniel as Hippodrome president. He is scheduled to start in early May. "I'm very much a community person, as interested in community arts — music, dance, everything — as in Broadway tours," Legler, 46, said.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 15, 1991
A new monthly tabloid newspaper devoted to the local arts scene is scheduled to be on the streets Tuesday.The initial issue of Art in Progress will have as its cover story a question-and-answer interview with artist and art benefactor Amalie Rothschild and will also contain several art and theater reviews, according to managing editor Bonnie North. There will also be columns on architecture, poetry and government and the arts, she added.The 20-page publication will have a press run of 6,000 and will be distributed free at art galleries, libraries, restaurants and bookstores, Ms. North said.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
The dramatic music of Broadway, the precise steps of ballerinas, the flowing brush strokes of Oriental-style painting and the echoing sounds of the Celtic harp will all be on display this spring in Howard County, where more than 100 resident groups contribute to a rich and diverse artistic scene. As the arts community has thrived, local audiences have responded. The county's population increased by 13 percent between 1995 and 2000, but attendance at arts events increased 90 percent during that time, according to ArtsVision: State of the Arts in Howard County 2003, a report sponsored by the Howard County Arts Council.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Were it all to unfold according to script, the curtain would soon be falling on the National Endowment for the Arts.Condemned as a tool of liberals and elitists and a champion of taxpayer-financed pornography, the arts endowment was a gleaming bull's-eye for the cost-cutting conservatives of the last Congress. Two years ago, Republican leaders vowed to wipe out any trace of it by this fall.But today, because of shifting political winds and an arts community that learned to campaign with sophistication and a sprinkling of stardust, the death scene hardly seems certain.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 5, 2002
Randall Vega is looking to bring a new feel to Baltimore's arts scene, and she's hoping to make it happen by taking a page from her New England past. Vega, the city's cultural affairs director, borrowed a small-town New England tradition and held a town meeting last Tuesday of 300 Baltimore artists, musicians and other performers. It was a fresh approach that highlights what many say is Vega's commitment to bringing the city's arts community into the public eye. "Coming from New England, knowing the wonderful democratic feel of town meetings; you know, it's worked well for a couple hundred years," Vega, 54, said recently.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
Few speak of Annapolis' cultural life with greater authority than Anna Greenberg. A self-described "professional volunteer" who has twice served as president of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's Board of Trustees and continues to be active on other local advisory boards, Greenberg is passionate about her city's history of strong and independent support for the performing and fine arts. "Annapolis has always felt the need to have an authentic arts community of its own," she says. "We never sat back and depended on Baltimore and Washington, because the people of culture who've settled here, for the most part, haven't been from Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
The reasons for Leslie B. Dunner's dismissal as musical director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra remained shrouded in secrecy last night as its board of trustees held a special meeting in Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Dunner, 47, left the meeting at 9 p.m. and refused to comment. After a short break, board members reconvened in the converted high school after he left. Through a security guard posted at the door outside the meeting, board president Fred H. "Bud" Billups declined to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Jeth Mill has been named executive director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. Mill, pictured above, most recently served five years as executive director of the Windsor Symphony Orchestra in Ontario. His resume also lists top administrative posts at the Des Moines Symphony, Lincoln (Neb.) Symphony Orchestra, New Hampshire Symphony, and Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic. In a statement released by the Annapolis Symphony, Mill said he was "extremely happy to be returning to the United States and especially to Annapolis.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 7, 2013
I went in search of a place recently named the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District and found myself inside one of its most prominent addresses. But like so many places in Baltimore where artists live and work, you have to be introduced or know a password, as if it were some sort of an arts speakeasy. I gained entry to the H&H Building, which is fabled among Baltimore's arts community, but except for the outdoors and military surplus store on the ground floor, is all but unknown to the rest of us. H&H, which stands for Harold and Howard, the guys who founded the camping gear business decades ago, is located at Eutaw and Franklin streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
When bad luck struck, John Mann was all but certain that he'd have to abandon his dreams. In 2005, Mann was a 28-year-old film school graduate who was just starting to make inroads in the difficult East Coast television industry. He hoped to one day move to Los Angeles and direct movies. And then, his wife fell ill while she was pregnant with their son. "Even though things had been starting to go our way, we were getting paid almost nothing," says Mann, 35, of Crownsville. "It really became a situation where we needed really good health insurance and we needed it right now. A choice had to be made, so I joined the Army.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Baltimore has been enveloped for weeks in a deep purple hue - figuratively at the very least, often literally - and this all-Ravens-all-the-time stimulation was bound to rub off on the arts community. Local artists have been expressing their enthusiasm for the Ravens throughout the football season with freshly created works, including pop-up images on downtown streets and murals in private homes. "It's pretty natural for artists to get excited about something going on in popular culture," said Jenny Carson, chair of the art history department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Artists who tackle sports subjects do not necessarily get their rah-rahs out by doing portraits of popular athletes or incorporating team logos.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | November 5, 2012
The arrival of November means not only Thanksgiving in Carroll County. Craft fairs and bazaars fill the calendar this month, offering a variety of items to meet every budget. Now in its 39th year, Ascension Episcopal Church's Mistletoe Mart in Westminster features 50 craftsmen, and attracts an average of 3,000 people over its three-day run, Nov. 8-10, according to Joyce Brown, co-chair. The juried craft show traditionally has a waiting list of crafters wanting to participate.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
As a member of the arts community, I find it to be very exciting that Harford County will get a new arts center funded by a major contribution from Emily Bayless Graham ("Designs are unveiled for Harford arts center," Oct. 24). What bothers me however is the hiring of a New York firm to design it. Maryland, and particularly Baltimore and it's surrounding counties, have several extremely talented architectural firms, some of which have excellent reputations for this type of project.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
As a member of the arts community, I find it to be very exciting that Harford County will get a new arts center funded by a major contribution from Emily Bayless Graham ("Designs are unveiled for Harford arts center," Oct. 24). What bothers me however is the hiring of a New York firm to design it. Maryland, and particularly Baltimore and it's surrounding counties, have several extremely talented architectural firms, some of which have excellent reputations for this type of project.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
After four months in office, President Clinton still hasn't gotten around to appointing a chairman for the embattled National Endowment of the Arts, which is still trying to recover from the pummeling it took from conservative senators last year over its funding of controversial images by Robert Mapplethorpe and Andres Serrano. The delay in naming an NEA chairman is causing some in the arts community to question the administration's commitment to upholding the principle of free expression.
EXPLORE
By Carolyn Kelemen | March 22, 2012
Four vocalists, three instrumentalists, two dancers. That's the field competing this year for the title of Howard County's Rising Star, an honor bestowed annually at the "Celebration of the Arts in Howard County. " This year's gala, Saturday, March 24 in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center at Howard Community College, includes food, a silent auction and the announcement of the year's Howie Award recipients, chosen for their contribution to the arts community.
EXPLORE
February 17, 2012
Artwork by Carroll County Public Schools students will be featured at two exhibits in celebration of Youth Art Month in March. An exhibit of art by elementary and middle school students will be held from Feb. 23 to March 14, at the Carroll County Arts Center, 91 W. Main St., Westminster. Receptions will be held Thursday, March 1, and Thursday, March 8, from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit will be open to the public during the center's normal operating hours. Then, high school artwork will be on display from Feb. 27 through March 27, at the Langdon Gallery at Carroll Community College, 1601 Washington Road, Westminster.
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