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By David Schoetz and David Schoetz,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, a Maryland Democrat, will be inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences today at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. Sarbanes will join more than 200 honorees from the United States and abroad and will be one of five featured speakers at the ceremony. "This is quite an honor," said Sarbanes, who will be recognized in the public affairs, business and administration discipline. "You're with some people that have made outstanding contributions in both the past and present."
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EXPLORE
February 29, 2012
Amanda Walsh has been named to the fall 2011 dean's list at Gonzaga University, Spokane, Wash. Nadejda Hvoyneva , a resident of Cockeysville, has earned a bachelor's degree in business from Excelsior College, Albany, N.Y. Michael Lackey , of Towson, and Hannah Shultz , of Lutherville, have been named to the fall 2011 dean's list at Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa. Rebecca Taylor , of Timonium, graduated from...
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Johns Hopkins UniversityStaff Writer | December 21, 1992
Baltimore philanthropist Zanvyl Krieger has pledged $50 million to the Johns Hopkins University over the next five years, the institution's biggest gift ever and one of the largest in the history of American higher education.Mr. Krieger, an 86-year-old businessman and lawyer who graduated from Hopkins in 1928, stipulated that he will match up to $50 million in gifts to the endowment for the university's financially strapped School of Arts and Sciences.University officials are confident they can raise the $50 million in matching funds, although it will require stepped-up giving to the arts and sciences' endowment, which has recently been receiving about $4 million in gifts a year.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2011
Thousands of children, from toddlers to 12-year-olds, did something yesterday that seems almost novel in the age of computers and digital games: They went outside and played. In the chilly air of the first Sunday of October, Rash Field at Baltimore's Inner Harbor became a sprawling playground. Over six hours, boys and girls skipped rope, jumped rope, hula-hooped, played with sticks and created works of sidewalk art with colorful chalk. They chased big, soapy bubbles created by a clown on stilts.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
The longtime chairman of art history has been appointed dean of arts and sciences at the Johns Hopkins University, assuming leadership of a school that has been troubled by the defection of distinguished faculty members.Herbert L. Kessler, the Charlotte Bloomberg professor of art history, was approved as dean of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences during a telephone conference yesterday of the executive committee of the university's board of trustees.Kessler is the second new dean announced this week.
NEWS
By STEPHEN BRAUN AND MICHAEL MUSKAL and STEPHEN BRAUN AND MICHAEL MUSKAL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 22, 2006
Embattled Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers announced yesterday that he would step down at the end of this academic year, ending one of the shortest tenures in the university's history. In a posting on the university Web site, Summers, the former secretary of the Treasury, said he would resign as of June 30. "Working closely with all parts of the Harvard community, and especially with our remarkable students, has been one of the great joys of my professional life," he said in the open letter to the Harvard community.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 12, 2006
Sigmund Richard Suskind, a retired microbiologist who had been dean of arts and sciences at the Johns Hopkins University and the first ombudsman for its Homewood campus, died of cancer complications Dec. 5 at Chester River Hospital in Chestertown. The former Mount Washington resident was 80. Born and raised in New York City, he was the son of Seymour Suskind, an NBC Symphony Orchestra violinist who played for maestro Arturo Toscanini. Family members said the younger Mr. Suskind did not share his father's ability - although he appreciated music throughout his life.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Njideka Agwuna , of Columbia, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University, State University of New York, in Vestal, N.Y.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
The longtime chairman of art history has been appointed dean of arts and sciences at the Johns Hopkins University, assuming leadership of a school that has been troubled by the defection of distinguished faculty members.Herbert L. Kessler, the Charlotte Bloomberg professor of art history, was approved as dean of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences during a telephone conference yesterday of the executive committee of the university's board of trustees.Kessler, 56, is the second new dean announced this week.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 7, 1996
The Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences is sponsoring a creative writing competition for county schoolchildren, grades two through 12. Entries of 500 words or less will be accepted through Dec. 6.The competition is divided into three age categories.High school students are asked to write about technology: Is it increasing man's ability to do for mankind or reducing concern for mankind?Middle school students: How do you propose to make your community a better place to live? Be specific about how you would implement your ideas.
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
Njideka Agwuna , of Columbia, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester at the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences at Binghamton University, State University of New York, in Vestal, N.Y.
EXPLORE
August 17, 2011
Cockeysville resident Jordan Tryhubenko, a member of the Class of 2012 at Washington College, in Chestertown, participated in the Summer 2011 Research Program at the college. The chemistry major, who is the daughter of Steve and Paula Tryhubenko, spent her summer investigating new organic reactions to aid in the synthesis of curved molecules. At Washington College, she is also president of the college's American Chemical Society chapter, vice president of the Health Occupational Students of America chapter and a member of Tri-Beta National Honor Society for biology and the Cater Society of Junior Fellows honor society.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
Students patiently scraped away a shallow layer of dirt in a trio of test pits last week as gentle breezes wafted past, nudging the stubborn humidity of summer southward. Nearby, a 6-foot-long segment of stone wall barely crested the soil's surface in another row of sondages, as the 3-foot-square pits are called by archaeologists. Using trigonometry, the students were calculating angles to help predict the configuration of what might lie buried there. Four of the five workers had the privilege of toiling this summer alongside academicians and students at an international excavation site on a picturesque hilltop in France.
NEWS
January 5, 2009
Five Johns Hopkins University researchers have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science by their peers. Jonathan Bagger, Ted Dawson, Barbara Landau, Jun Liu and Jeremy Nathans are among 486 new fellows around the world. Election as a fellow honors their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. Bagger was elected for distinguished contributions to the field of theoretical high-energy physics and for leadership of the U.S. high-energy physics community.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | November 12, 2008
When Ronald J. Daniels began to sense that he was a serious candidate for the Johns Hopkins University presidency, he drove to Baltimore by himself to check the place out. Daniels had never been to Hopkins before. His meetings with the presidential search committee had all been in New York. So one day this summer, he walked around Hopkins' leafy Homewood campus and admired the colonial architecture. He explored the medical campus in East Baltimore and then picked up crab cakes to take home to his family in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2008
When Ronald J. Daniels began to sense that he was a serious candidate for the Johns Hopkins University presidency, he drove to Baltimore by himself to check the place out. Daniels had never been to Hopkins before. His meetings with the presidential search committee had all been in New York. So one day this summer, he walked around Hopkins' leafy Homewood campus and admired the colonial architecture. He explored the medical campus in East Baltimore and then picked up crab cakes to take home to his family in Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | August 14, 1992
Producer Robert Rehme, a Hollywood veteran, has been named the new president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences -- the group that runs the Oscars every March. He replaces Karl Malden, who led the 5,000-member organization for the last three years."I don't envision any major projects in the next year," says Mr. Rehme.Co-producer of "Patriot Games," from Paramount, Mr. Rehme has been a board member for eight years.
NEWS
November 14, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University announced yesterday the creation of two scholarship programs by its Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences in memory of six alumni killed during the terrorist attacks Sept. 11. The alumni are Thomas Cahill, Class of 1987; Paul J. Friedman, Class of 1978; Matt O'Mahony, Class of 1984; David W. Nelson, Class of 1973; and Glenn Wall, Class of 1984, all graduates of the School of Arts and Sciences; and John Sammartino, who earned his master's degree in 1990 from the Whiting School of Engineering.
NEWS
By Gary Vikan | February 10, 2008
Many people were surprised that the Walters Art Museum would partner with the Space Telescope Science Institute (along with the Johns Hopkins University's Program in Museums and Society) to bring photo enlargements from the Hubble Space Telescope to our exhibition galleries. After all, most of us believe that art and science have been following divergent paths for centuries - since long before physicist and novelist C. P. Snow made that seeming split explicit in his famous Rede Lecture of May 1959, "The Two Cultures," wherein he characterized the two as mutually incomprehensible.
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