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NEWS
September 17, 2011
I admire and endorse Joe Ehrmann's recommendations for a new approach to sports in education ("Athletics as education," Sept. 15), and I would point out that much of what he says is equally true of the arts. The arts can help bridge "the achievement gap. " They promote human rights, diversity, etc., and, when the right coaching is applied, they teach an "other-centered" curriculum. Often in school cultures, however, successful student artists are labeled sissies or weirdos, while successful student athletes are characterized as heroes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
The recent article on the new exhibit at American Visionary Art Museum incorrectly describes the lilies in the icon of St. Kateri Tekakwitha as a "talisman," which is an object thought to bring good luck or have magic powers ( "New exhibit at AVAM explores the moment of inspiration," Oct. 6). A devout Catholic, the "Lily of the Mohawks" would have no use for luck or magic - she had Christ. As with the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Joseph, St. Rose of Lima and others occasionally represented holding lilies, the flower is a symbol of purity.
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NEWS
By Christopher Ames | January 22, 2012
With the primaries in full swing, the cowboy poetry festival and Big Bird have returned to the news. The Nevada festival is the most recent whipping boy for those who oppose government funding of the arts. Mitt Romney joined this chorus by suggesting that, in his administration, "Big Bird is going to have advertisements," meaning that he would advocate using advertising revenue to replace government funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Similarly, Mr. Romney suggested that the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities seek private philanthropy to replace their government funding.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
It's full of used goods, but “second-hand shop” is the last thing you'd ever call Mud and Metal fine craft gallery. As the song goes, at Mud and Metal, “everything old is new again.” Gallery owner Carol Breining, who set up shop on the famed “Avenue” in Baltimore's Hampden neighborhood, specializes in an inanimate form of reincarnation, using hundreds of artists, both out of town and local, to satisfy her clients' desire for recycled art....
NEWS
December 12, 2009
A gala that drew nearly 300 guests raised almost $100,000 toward a proposed Harford County Center for the Arts. In a takeoff on a popular TV competition, the second annual Dancing for the Arts last month at Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace paired experienced dance instructors and studio owners with local officials and business leaders, many of them unpracticed in tangos, waltzes and fox trots. Organized four years ago to build a home for the arts, the nonprofit Center for the Arts group is searching for a location with about 22 acres and is raising construction money.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
After the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, what's needed is more gun control, according to columnist Dan Rodricks ("The massacre this time," Dec. 15). Yet a story in the same edition described a man in China who used a knife to attack some 20 children. The problem is not the weapon, but the troubled young men who wield them. It is a daunting, if not impossible task for psychiatrists, psychologists and others to take the first step in situations where even parents are frustrated and helpless in dealing with a troubled child.
EXPLORE
March 11, 2013
The Dance Conservatory of Maryland will hold its annual Contemporary Showcase this month, with proceeds being donated to Center for the Arts. The future Center for the Arts will serve Harford County as a facility, accessible to all, to nurture art, artists and the community in the disciplines of music, dance, theater and the visual and literary arts and Dance Conservatory of Maryland is excited to be able to support such a wonderful cause. The Contemporary Showcase will provide an offering of works from several classes at Dance Conservatory of Maryland, including jazz, tap, hip hop and modern.
NEWS
May 27, 2014
The recent commentary regarding the Baltimore School for the Arts and the experience of Jabril Leach who was dismissed from the school, has some validity ( "Who is responsible for Jabril?" May 19). No, the school is not equipped to deal with the Jabrils of Baltimore, but at the Baltimore School for the Arts, you will find teachers and administrators willing to meet you halfway. As a student coming from the city's hood, I needed teachers who would go beyond the call of duty (Stephanie Powell and R.C. Gladney to name two)
NEWS
May 30, 2013
As managing director of the Baltimore Rock Opera Society (BROS), I've been keenly aware of several recent developments in the relationship between the arts and culture community and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration. Actions taken by city officials in response to concerns of public safety, including the closing of the Load of Fun building on North Avenue last August and the cancellation of Pow Wow in April, have caused many to wonder if the city is beginning to take a harder stance toward its emerging artist's community.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
Howard County Center for the Arts 8510 High Ridge Road, Ellicott City. Information: 410-313-ARTS (2787), or www.hocoarts.org. The Howard County Center for the Arts houses visual arts studies, classrooms, black box theatre, meeting space for affiliated arts organizations and space for resident art groups in its 27,000-square-foot facility. Participating music groups include the Howard County Regional Youth Orchestra, which conducts weekly rehearsals in the theater from September through June.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, already a known Annapolis arts destination, solidified that role last Sunday with a celebration unveiling the results of its $1.6 million renovation - a project that includes 543 new seats, an orchestra pit, stage extension and improved acoustics. Brief performances were offered by Maryland Hall's four resident companies: Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, Annapolis Opera, Annapolis Chorale and Ballet Theatre of Maryland. The 170 voices of the Annapolis Chorale, together with the chamber orchestra, opened the concert auspiciously with "O fortuna" from "Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Doberman sits on the edge of a bed, oblivious of the remarkable view from the floor-to-ceiling window. Modern high-rises peep out from a dense forest dotted with palm trees and shrouded in mist. Artist Jereme Scott says his painting was inspired by a 1957 photograph in National Geographic. At 66 inches by 50 inches, “The Watcher of Suite Singapore” is the largest item on display at his store, Cotton Duck Art & Apparel, in Historic Ellicott City. The shop, which opened in March, also sells T-shirts, hoodies and tank tops Scott designed, and jewelry made by designers from the Mid-Atlantic.  Scott, 28, studied fine arts at St. Joseph's University in Philadelphia and received his master's in studio arts from Howard University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Carol A. MacPhail, who had been an administrator and art teacher at Friends School and Bryn Mawr School, died Wednesday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 71. The daughter of Norbert Albert Witt, who had been president of Noxell, and Cecile R. Porter Witt, a homemaker, the former Carol Ann Witt was born in Detroit. She spent her early years in Evanston, Ill., and Greenwich, Conn., before moving to Homeland in 1954 with her family. She was a 1961 graduate of Friends School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1977 in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art . In 1989, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from the Johns Hopkins University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
NEWS
By Christina Davidson | September 9, 2014
My father's Ohio hometown was named after a battle in Bladensburg, Md. Aug. 24, 1814, where my 4-times-great grandfather, Samuel Davidson, fought against the invading British. American cultural identity worships valor and victory, and my history teachers always skimmed the War of 1812, so I grew up assuming Bladensburg, Ohio commemorated a glorious triumph. After moving to D.C. in my 20s, I finally learned Bladensburg was a humiliating disaster that scarcely impeded the British march to burn Washington.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
R.I.P. Handy. It's given name was The Epicentral Shrine to the Helping Hand Vehicular, but one look at Conrad Bladey's beloved art car made it immediately clear why everyone knew it as Handy. A 1990 Pontiac Grand Am, Handy was covered front-to-back, but especially on top, with dozens of mostly bright-red fiberglass hands. No one who saw it on the streets of Baltimore, or hitting the road in its northern Anne Arundel County home of Linthicum, will ever forget the sight. Handy always made quite an impression.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | February 25, 1995
Billions for Star Wars but not one cent for the arts! That apparently is going to be the battle cry of Congress' new Republican majority, heroes all.Conservatives have long accused the National Endowment of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities of being ''elitist'' institutions dominated by insular liberal cliques remote from the concerns of ordinary Americans.Never mind that most large arts institutions that receive federal subsidies are governed by blue-blooded boards made up of conservative businesspeople and the old-money establishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-enclosed Dance Cube jutting from the structure; views of the downtown Baltimore skyline from upper floors. Phase one of the project was finished two years ago; phase two wrapped up in time for this week's start of UMBC's academic year. The $160 million, environmentally conscious edifice brings together under one roof (painted white for maximum reflection and energy savings)
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Harford County community leaders will showcase their ballroom dancing talents and compete for top honors to benefit the Center for the Arts on Saturday, Nov. 15 at the 7th annual Dancing for the Arts Fundraising Gala. Sponsored by the Center for the Arts, the gala is from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. at the Maryland Golf and Country Clubs. The dancing stars, many with no dance experience, are engaging in private dance lessons with the professional dance instructors from Dancing with Friends Dance Studio.
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