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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
For many opera fans, Maria Callas was the last word on lyrical passion. But there was another extraordinary soprano before, during and after La Divina's relatively brief reign -- Magda Olivero, who developed something of a cult following for her visceral singing and acting. Olivero died Sept. 8 at the age of 104. The tributes will be many. ( Tom Huizenga has posted a fine one for NPR. ) I regret that I didn't pay enough attention to Olivero, never sought out her recordings as energetically as I did those of Callas.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
For many opera fans, Maria Callas was the last word on lyrical passion. But there was another extraordinary soprano before, during and after La Divina's relatively brief reign -- Magda Olivero, who developed something of a cult following for her visceral singing and acting. Olivero died Sept. 8 at the age of 104. The tributes will be many. ( Tom Huizenga has posted a fine one for NPR. ) I regret that I didn't pay enough attention to Olivero, never sought out her recordings as energetically as I did those of Callas.
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By Amalie Adler Ascher | October 13, 1990
It is easy to fall under the spell of a bonsai. To see a tree reduced by human hands to a fraction of its size and shaped to appear as though it had been ravaged by sea and wind since time immemorial, is to want one for your own.You can acquire a bonsai ready-made from commercial sources or you can create one of your own. If you lack the patience of the great Oriental masters, who spend lifetimes pruning and bending trunks and branches, beginning when the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Viewers see first the beast's ravenous mouth, with six fangs increasing in size and as pointed as daggers. The fiend is wearing a "Vote" button with an image of the American flag, and its tail snakes into a dollar sign. Even before gallery-goers scan the caption — "Monstrous costs: Total House and Senate campaign expenditures" — they have a good idea which dismal fact of modern life is being illustrated. Moreover, they know exactly how artist Nigel Holmes feels about the increase.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1995
Watching Roberto Alomar play second base can be likened to watching a trapeze artist work without a net. It can be breathtaking.Even in Baltimore, where infielders have won 38 Gold Gloves in the last 25 years, Alomar's artistry is recognized as being in a class by itself. Davey Johnson and Bobby Grich won seven Gold Gloves (in a span of seven years) while playing second base for the Orioles but as dependable as they were, their defensive prowess pales in comparison to the Blue Jays' phenom.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 1, 2002
When a regional orchestra such as the Annapolis Symphony entertains visiting soloists, chances are they will be gifted young artists ascending the ranks of their profession. There have been exceptions, however, and this year will be one of them. When the local orchestra opens its 42nd season this month, Maestro Leslie B. Dunner and his players will be playing host to none other than Hilary Hahn, a 22-year-old violinist who has carved out a niche for herself at the highest level in this golden age of violin playing.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 13, 2007
THE APPEARANCE OF A HIP-hop symphony at any time would be newsy. The arrival of one right now, just as this dominant music genre is under fresh scrutiny for the content and impact of its lyrics, is uncanny. "I believe in the providence of God, in terms of the timing of this," says Darin Atwater, the composer of Paint Factory, a symphony for rappers, vocal soloists, chorus and orchestra that will make its premiere this week. PAINT FACTORY / / Will be performed 8 p.m. Friday at Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda.
NEWS
By Holly Hanson and By Holly Hanson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | June 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- It should have been the best moment of Kevan Hall's life.Instead, when he was named to the top design post at Halston last year, the response from fashion's elite was uniform and pointed: Who's he?Never mind that Hall had survived 20 years in the fickle fashion industry, heading his own Los Angeles company for 11 years and working as a free-lance designer for many others. He had dressed celebrities, done movie costumes, received a Great American Designer award from the NAACP and created a dress for Absolut Vodka's long-running series of ads.But he was virtually unknown, especially on New York's insular Seventh Avenue.
NEWS
May 29, 2009
JANE RANDOLPH, 93 Actress starrred in 'Cat People' Jane Randolph, who was memorably terrorized by shadow and sound in the original Cat People, died May 4 at a hospital near Gstaad, Switzerland. Ms. Randolph appeared in more than 20 films. Cat People (1942), revered by film enthusiasts for its artistry under a strained budget, brought Ms. Randolph her greatest public renown.
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | January 16, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Figure skating is undergoing a subtle shift -- a change that could bring aesthetic satisfaction to traditionalists.As the U.S. Figure Skating Championships begin in San Jose, Calif., look for a return to the artistry that characterized the sport for so long. Judges will still expect to see plenty of difficult triple jumps, but skaters this year will be expected to go beyond the pure athleticism of the recent past."This year they'll be looking for the all-around skater," said Carol Heiss Jenkins, five-time women's world champion (1956-60)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
If hearing there's a Tim Burton exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art conjures up visions of a bunch of movie stills, costumes and assorted props — well, you're probably going to be disappointed by the show that wraps up its five-month stay in the Big Apple on April 26. But you'll probably be the only one who's disappointed. While plenty of pieces will call to mind movies like "Edward Scissorhands," "Batman" and "Alice In Wonderland," plenty have nothing to do with what's been shown on screen during Burton's 25 years as a feature-film director.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
The production of "The Mystery of Irma Vep" running at Everyman Theatre has a portrait that drips blood, an Egyptian sarcophagus, hidden passages out of which characters unexpectedly pop, a mad woman in the dungeon and such deliberately tongue-in-cheek dialogue as, "He killed the wrong wolf!" As outlandish as the onstage antics might seem, they can't hold a snuffed-out candle to the frenzied activity taking place backstage. Three dressers and a stagehand conduct a carefully choreographed dance that allows the show's two actors to make up to 50 full costume changes during each performance, complete with Victorian-era petticoats, wigs, false teeth and top hats - often in two seconds or less.
NEWS
May 29, 2009
JANE RANDOLPH, 93 Actress starrred in 'Cat People' Jane Randolph, who was memorably terrorized by shadow and sound in the original Cat People, died May 4 at a hospital near Gstaad, Switzerland. Ms. Randolph appeared in more than 20 films. Cat People (1942), revered by film enthusiasts for its artistry under a strained budget, brought Ms. Randolph her greatest public renown.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | January 8, 2008
Hawaii failed in its bid to keep football coach June Jones, who was successfully wooed by SMU with an offer of about $2 million a year for five years. Hawaii reportedly was offering $1.3 million for five years with a $1 million bonus if Jones stayed the entire time. The school was also committing to putting more resources into football, including upgrading the facilities. Apparently that was a major concern for the run-and-shoot coach, who took over a program that was winless the season before he arrived in 1999.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | August 2, 2007
As a performer, Felicia Curry is lithe, liquid, refined. She must be at least three-quarters cat, because she seems incapable of making any movement, including waggling her butt, that isn't a masterpiece of unself-conscious elegance. As is true of all felines, Curry's artistry is rooted in strength, hard work and discipline. It's faintly ironic, then, that she's starring in a children's show about the importance of breaking free from constraints. If You Go The Araboolies of Liberty Street runs through Aug. 12 at Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | May 13, 2007
THE APPEARANCE OF A HIP-hop symphony at any time would be newsy. The arrival of one right now, just as this dominant music genre is under fresh scrutiny for the content and impact of its lyrics, is uncanny. "I believe in the providence of God, in terms of the timing of this," says Darin Atwater, the composer of Paint Factory, a symphony for rappers, vocal soloists, chorus and orchestra that will make its premiere this week. PAINT FACTORY / / Will be performed 8 p.m. Friday at Music Center at Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | January 16, 1994
The world is one big marketplace. The artistry of foreign fashion once was available only to the privileged. But with the advent of instant visuals and high-speed travel, fabrics and designs of faraway places quickly find their way to shops half a world away.Traditional Japanese design, distinguished by its simplicity and refinement of natural elements, can today be integrated into any modern woman's wardrobe. The easy and roomy cuts of the floor-length kimono or shorter hapi coat are particularly suitable for informal entertaining.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | August 2, 2007
As a performer, Felicia Curry is lithe, liquid, refined. She must be at least three-quarters cat, because she seems incapable of making any movement, including waggling her butt, that isn't a masterpiece of unself-conscious elegance. As is true of all felines, Curry's artistry is rooted in strength, hard work and discipline. It's faintly ironic, then, that she's starring in a children's show about the importance of breaking free from constraints. If You Go The Araboolies of Liberty Street runs through Aug. 12 at Imagination Stage, 4908 Auburn Ave., Bethesda.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | March 20, 2007
The voice of Barbara Cook has a quality so honest and beautifully pure that it can take your breath away. Or, as I don't mind admitting, can trigger an immediate response in the lacrimal glands. That the treasurable Cook retains such a powerful artistry at 79 just adds to her aura and allure. In a program presented Saturday afternoon by the Washington Performing Arts Society to a large, understandably adoring crowd at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, Cook shared the stage with a remarkable talent from a younger generation, Audra McDonald.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | December 9, 2006
Amit Evron looked down at his creation yesterday with admiration. There was his robot, M&M, fulfilling his classroom assignment by designing works of art. Competing against eight other robots, M&M won top honors, the People's Choice Award, with its multicolored spiral designs splashed across white poster boards. "I don't think I could do that," the Johns Hopkins University senior said of the efforts of the robot, which he created with partner Alican Demir. Perhaps he can't. But Evron and Demir created something that could, merging academic areas that are often considered opposites: art and science.
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