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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
Pamela C. Florenz, a retired commercial artist who also painted landscapes in watercolors, died Sept. 15 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Timonium resident was 85. Pamela Callahan, the daughter of dairy farmers, was born and raised in Easton. She was a 1940 graduate of Easton High School. After graduating in 1944 from the Maryland Institute College of Art , she worked as a commercial artist with a specialty in women's fashion.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A painting of a confident-looking bulldog wearing a Baltimore Orioles baseball cap propped outside the artist Robert McClintock's studio bears a caption reading, "How 'bout dem O's, hon!" The artist Tom Matarazzo's hand-painted screens of the Orioles Bird, with jauntily tipped cap and grinning beak, have never been more in demand than they are this month. Steve Mull's colored-marker drawing of an Orioles team jersey, mitt and a pair of steamed crabs evokes such strong associations with the city that you can practically taste the Old Bay seasoning on those crustaceans.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Carolyn Elizabeth Cates, a retired quality-control inspector and mixed-media artist, died of complications from cancer March 24 at Seasons Hospice in Randallstown. The Columbia resident was 75. Born Carolyn Edwards in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk, she was a 1954 graduate of Sollers Point High School. She earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Morgan State University. Ms. Cates worked at Westinghouse, later Northrop Grumman, as a quality-control inspector. She retired in 2002.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Mary Veiga practices the art of deception -- but only in the most respectable of ways. Since 1995, she has been plying her skills in decorative painting, which includes murals, faux finishing and trompe l'oeil for homeowners and businesses. With her, every assignment is a custom job and a new challenge that excites. “Trompe l'oeil is French for 'deceive the eye,' so it's a technique for using realistic imagery [and] shadows to create an optical illusion to make [the work] look three-dimensional,” said the Baltimore-based artist, who attended the Maryland Institute College of Art. “Faux painting, again French, means 'false' and is an old art form used to describe a paint finish replicating a real material such as marble, stone or wood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
A painting of a confident-looking bulldog wearing a Baltimore Orioles baseball cap propped outside the artist Robert McClintock's studio bears a caption reading, "How 'bout dem O's, hon!" The artist Tom Matarazzo's hand-painted screens of the Orioles Bird, with jauntily tipped cap and grinning beak, have never been more in demand than they are this month. Steve Mull's colored-marker drawing of an Orioles team jersey, mitt and a pair of steamed crabs evokes such strong associations with the city that you can practically taste the Old Bay seasoning on those crustaceans.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 4, 2011
Mary M. Stallings, a former hairstylist and artist, died Tuesday of heart failure at a daughter's Woodstock, Va., home. She was 98. Mary Margaret Francis was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and moved in 1919 with her family to Forest Park. She attended city public schools. Before World War II, Mrs. Stallings owned and operated a beauty shop in the old Emerson Hotel at Baltimore and Calvert streets. She later styled her customers' hair from her home. The former longtime Timonium resident, who had lived in Woodstock since 2003, was a self-taught artist.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Pamela Becker, a graphics design production manager and artist, died of cancer Dec. 17 at her Owings Mills home. She was 64. Born Pamela Joyce Brown in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Henry Brown, who owned a jewelry distributorship, and his wife, Rosalyn Laskin Brown, an accountant at that business. She was raised on Hayward Avenue in Pimlico and later lived in Pikesville. She was a 1967 graduate of Pikesville High School, where she played lacrosse. She earned an associate's degree from Catonsville Community College.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 1, 2013
Although watercolor is a medium deployed by both Jing-Jy Chen and Bonita Glaser in the exhibit "2 Artists 2 Views," their distinctive subjects and styles make it easy to distinguish their artwork hanging on the walls of the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House. Jing-Jy Chen works within an Asian tradition that depicts natural subjects with watercolor and ink on paper. Indeed, a tree native to China figures into some of the work. In "Golden Ginkgo," that tree's distinctively shaped leaves are even more pronounced owing to the fact that the artist has a leaf-covered branch set against a pitch-black background.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
"I had been in the mire of nuts and bolts, working with lights, synthetic furs, outrageous materials," says artist Ryan Hackett. "I needed quiet. " Out of that quiet, the 34-year-old Prince George's County native created the works that earned him the 2010 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, a $25,000 annual juried competition for visual artists from the Mid-Atlantic region. Last year, Hackett was named a Sondheim finalist for his striking collection of nature-themed installations — a fake fur-covered bench vibrating from a concealed subwoofer that imitated the heartbeat of a hibernating polar bear; a synthetic skull of a white Siberian tiger with headphones that allowed people to hear the animal's digitally transformed vocalizing; small shells attached to the wall, emitting a chorus of cicada sounds.
NEWS
From The Aegis | February 25, 2013
The Harford County Cultural Arts Board has an exhibit by Harford County artist Lin McLain is on display at the Council Gallery, 212 S. Bond St., Bel Air. The exhibit features oil paintings with the focus on scenes from nature. The show, which runs through March, is free and open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. McLain's work is inspired by nature and the desire to "capture the beauty and amazing wonders of it all," according to a cultural arts board press release.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 3, 2014
At age 100, the commercial building at 120 W. North Ave. has enjoyed prosperity and suffered humiliation. It's now soon to become an arts center in the Station North neighborhood, whose transformation I've been watching for the past few years. Perhaps its worst hour happened in 2012, when the Fire Department ordered it closed. Inspectors took one look at the outdated 1914 wiring and said, "Shut it down. " Its main tenant, the Single Carrot Theatre , promptly moved out. "The electrical box was like something out of a Dr. Frankenstein movie," said Laurens "Mac" MacLure, director of the Baltimore Arts Realty Corp., who gave a tour of the roomy structure this week, as his group has been completing plans for a $6 million upgrade.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt Cech and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Past the boutiques and restaurants on Main Street in Ellicott City, it would be easy to miss Dee Cunningham's painting studio. The skate shop that shows art and the metal sculptor get overlooked, too. There's a ceramic artist, a jewelry maker, a photographer, a specialty car painter and more than a dozen others.  So Cunningham created an event to highlight the hidden art scene in the former mill town.  Artwalk will take place Oct. 11,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Morgan Eichensehr and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Jen Seidel had no idea that when she decided to shake things up at a costume party eight years ago, she would end up falling in love with body paint artistry and turning it into a successful career. Now, Seidel has released a coffee table book, "Covered," featuring photos of her modeled artwork and hopes to use it as a tool to help others and continue to "paint it forward. " In a recent phone interview, Seidel, 45, who lives in Reisterstown, talked about how she got started in body painting, where it's taken her in her career and why she, well, does what she does.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The flowering branches of Mulan magnolia that grace the cover of Joan Lok's new book on Chinese brush painting appear more brightly colored than in her original work, probably to catch the eye of someone browsing in a bookstore, guesses the author. The Columbia resident says she is pleased with the quality of paper used for the book and the way the reproductions of her original flower paintings neatly fit with the detailed instructions on the soft-cover book's 128 pages. And the longtime federal employee is also happy her first how-to book will be available at bookshops and at a local chain of craft stores, tapping into a marketing niche.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
It all started with a number: 49. Peter Bruun, a Copenhagen, Denmark-born artist who has made Baltimore his home since 1987, created a series of 49 drawings two years ago. "I thought at the time that they were simple sketches," Bruun says. "I then realized that I was 49, soon to turn 50. No one would know looking at those 49 drawings that they addressed life passing, but that's what I saw in them - the dawning awareness that you have a life behind you, and a finite horizon ahead.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Exploding cannon fire lit the sky and reflected off the water as rain poured down on American soldiers struggling to defend Fort McHenry against a British attack. It was September 1814, and after the Battle of Baltimore, Francis Scott Key penned the work that became our national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner. " The goal of Annapolis-based artist Greg Harlin has been bringing that scene to life - on a postage stamp. This past weekend, as Baltimore celebrated the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore, the U.S. Postal Service unveiled Harlin's creation: the War of 1812: Fort McHenry Forever stamp.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | April 13, 1992
ROBERT HENRI: HIS LIFE AND ART. By Bennard B. Perlman. Dover Publications. 176 pages. Illustrated. Paperback, $14.95. ROBERT Henri -- born in 1865 in Cincinnati, died in 1929 in New York -- is still considered one of the best U.S. painters, a great teacher and the man who initiated and organized the display of "modern" art that shoved aside "conservative" academic art in America.But as this fine biography by the Baltimore artist and scholar, Bennard Perlman, notes -- but doesn't emphasize -- Henri himself was considered conservative soon after his revolution began, and he became part of the artistic establishment for the last 15 years of his life.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
At Bay Theatre's Wine and Words production of "Four Weddings and an Elvis," a staged reading by Bay's brilliant team of actors on Sept. 8, the capacity audience discovered that life sometimes imitates art. The "Four Weddings" became five, with the fifth a real-life wedding ceremony in which Bay's co-founder and artistic director, Janet Luby, married longtime love Stephen Strawn in a ceremony on stage. The nuptials came with much applause and best wishes from at least 250 audience and family members in attendance, turning the show into a true wedding party.
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