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NEWS
July 10, 2013
Shacky Chic Boutique, located in the lobby of the Venus Theatre Play Shack, 21 C St., offers items from small, women-run and green businesses. The boutique's mission is to empower women artisans with established businesses by giving them a physical place to sell their products. Regular store hours are Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shopping is also available by appointment. Contact the Shacky Chic Boutique manager, Michelle Arsenault, at 301-604-0808 to make arrangements.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
With shabby-chic design back in high demand, there's no shortage of mass-produced decor disguised as antiques. But the genuine article - the old form reclaimed with a new function - is much harder to come by. With a nod to the Depression-era adage, “Waste not, want not,” these are the stories of three artistic visionaries giving new life to items once thought to be years past their prime. Old Wood, New Furniture General Manager James Battaglia is one of five men running Baltimore's Sandtown Millworks, hand-building furniture made almost entirely from the discarded innards of the city's rowhouses.
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TRAVEL
March 17, 2011
Hermes Festival of Crafts What: Want to see how the iconic Birkin or Kelly bag gets made? A weeklong exhibit and celebration of craftsmanship from the renowned French design house Hermes is the place to get a peek behind the scenes. The festival features demonstrations by the craftsmen and artisans who are the skill behind Hermes, which opened in Paris in 1837 as a maker of harnesses and saddles and today creates luxurious handbags, scarves, jewelry and other objects.
NEWS
Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
As a parade of designers and artisans swirls around him, Brian Keegan is an island of calm and a rock of assistance. He answers the telephone, keeps track of who comes and goes, replaces a few lightbulbs. It's his job for two months a year, and he loves it. Keegan, 73, is a “house sitter” for Historic Ellicott City's Decorator Show House, an annual event during which a historic Howard County property is restored, redecorated and opened to the public for a month.
NEWS
April 27, 2008
Havre de Grace Main Street is seeking artisans and crafters for its annual festival, the Graw Days, to be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 11. The Graw Days commemorate the construction of the Havre de Grace Racetrack, called "The Graw," which was started in 1912. The track was considered one of the best racing strips in the country and was the main training ground for owners who hoped to win the Kentucky Derby. The theme of the festival will be the Roaring Twenties, with emphasis on horse racing and horse-related items.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 14, 2002
Get a jump on your holiday shopping at the Washington Craft Show this weekend at the Convention Center in D.C. Browse among the handmade furniture, baskets, ceramics, glassworks, jewelry, metalworks, woodworks, wearables and more, created by 180 artisans and craftspeople from 34 states. Among the group is self-taught artisan Jeanine Guncheon, who has made folk art furniture that comedians Robin Williams and Eddie Murphy have purchased. Crafters were selected from a pool of 1,000 applicants.
FEATURES
By Robert Haskins | September 11, 1990
The genius of Irish artisans spanning three centuries -- at once sprightly, refined and heroic -- highlights "Irish Decorative Arts from the National Museum of Ireland," on display at the Walters Art Gallery through Oct. 28.The majority of the show's 82 pieces date from the 17th through the 19th centuries, a period in which Ireland's political fortunes waxed and waned as its government was gradually and implacably subsumed by the British crown. Nevertheless, Irish craftsmen of the era were at their zenith, producing many distinctive pieces of silver, ceramics, wooden furnishings, lace and glassware.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
The annual ACC Craft Fair has won a national reputation for showcasing the best work by the top artisans. Locally it has a reputation as the source for that spectacular jacket or piece of jewelry that marks an individualistic style.This year the fair is thematically divided: Art for the body will be anchored in Festival Hall, and home arts will be shown in the Convention Center at 1 W. Pratt St.Hand-crafted clothes survive the vagaries of fashion because their value lies not in the label but the time and care given to design and execution.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Marie McDonald sat on a small stage in a corner of the traditional-arts tent with a lap full of fragrant leis created with roses, baby's breath, bougainvillea, carnations and other blooms. A National Heritage Award winner, she came from Hawaii to speak about her craft yesterday at America's Reunion on the Mall."All children born in Hawaii make one at least one time or another," she told her audience. "Pretty soon, the lei is part of their life. There is not an occasion that they don't use a lei to celebrate with."
NEWS
By Staff report | September 12, 1990
Carroll County's finest artisans will open their studios for public display from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday for the sixth annual Crafts Guild Studio Tour.Tour participants will be able to visit seven craft studios around the county and see 17 artisans demonstrate the skills that have earned them a niche in the craft and art worlds.Enjoy the countryside while traveling from studio to studio, each of which offers a different style of architecture and additional delights in the variety of flower, herb and vegetable gardens surrounding it.For the true aficionado and collector, this tour offers a complete selection of the artisans' work.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
In a cabin built in the 1750s, just a few hundred feet from a 201-year-old stone bridge across the quiet Casselman River, a man sits at a slab of a wooden table, an array of carving tools spread before him. The rush of traffic from nearby Alternate U.S. 40, also known as Route 40, does not bother Gary Yoder. Nor does the "thump-thump-thump" of the weaving loom from the cabin next door. The most celebrated crafter of wooden bird sculptures in Western Maryland is too engrossed to notice.
NEWS
By Jessica Gregg and Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 25, 2014
Devin Mack was in a figurative drawing class at Ithaca College more than a decade ago when his professor handed him a roll of wire and said, "Here, make a figurative drawing out of this. " Mack, who was studying cinema and photography at the school, made his first sculpture and took the first step into a career. Today he continues to make wire sculpture "large and small" out of everything from coat hangers to precious metal. Indeed, probably one of his best known sculptures is a 12-foot-tall honeybee outside of Baltimore Honey, a community-supported apiary in Woodberry.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | March 31, 2014
Step into the Secolari shop at The Mall in Columbia, and you'll feel as though you're in a Tuscan farmhouse rather than a suburban shopping center. The walls are lined with stainless-steel containers, called fusti, filled with 20 different olive oils and 14 types of vinegar and aged balsamic. There's bread for sampling, along with other gourmet items proffered on rustic wooden tables designed by the store owners and made by a local lumber company. Champagne mimosa vinegar, basil-flavored olive oil, pear ginger wasabi balsamic, blackberry with roasted pepper vinegar and blood orange olive oil are some of Secolari's most unusual and popular flavors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Every year at the American Craft Council Show in Baltimore, rows and rows of handmade material sit in booths for on-lookers to gaze at and admire. And behind the uniquely crafted jewelry and perfectly glazed ceramic pieces sits an artist, whose work on each piece is extensive. The artists spend hours designing their collections, carving their materials and sewing their pieces together. The show returns to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend to showcase more 650 craft artists from all over the country.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Julia T. Kappler, an insurance agent who won awards for her handmade hooked rugs, died of cancer Feb. 2 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 74. Born Julia Scott Todd in Orange, Va., she was the daughter of James T. Todd, a longtime Orange County treasurer, and Orene Dickinson Todd, a homemaker. She was a 1956 graduate of Orange High School and earned a degree at Sweet Briar College, where she was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. Mrs. Kappler moved to Atlanta, where she worked at the Georgia Historical Society.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Shacky Chic Boutique, located in the lobby of the Venus Theatre Play Shack, 21 C St., offers items from small, women-run and green businesses. The boutique's mission is to empower women artisans with established businesses by giving them a physical place to sell their products. Regular store hours are Thursdays from 4 to 7 p.m. and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shopping is also available by appointment. Contact the Shacky Chic Boutique manager, Michelle Arsenault, at 301-604-0808 to make arrangements.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 2, 2010
T he church officers decided the pew cushions had to go. That 1859 horsehair stuffing was getting no softer. Downtown Baltimore's First and Franklin Street Presbyterian Church is making substantial changes during a winter-long $1.5 million renovation. Come spring, the 248-year-old congregation will have air conditioning for the first time and a repainted interior, paid for largely with money raised by the congregation through pledges and donations. Removing the old seat pads was the easy part.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2013
When Stacey Barich turned the modest dining room of her Parkville home into a tiki bar inspired by the 1930s, it became a project of passion for the 40-year-old photographer. Pairing her love of vintage culture with a growing obsession with authenticity, Barich quickly found herself on eBay, searching and bidding for additions to the new favorite room in her house. The research and collecting quickly led Barich to the world of handcrafted cocktails. "Once that happens, you're picking up old vintage books on how to make things," Barich said.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Ellen Reich's business - run out of her Butcher's Hill rowhouse - has international reach. She's the proprietress (she loves that word) of Three Stone Steps, which sells metal art, recycled jewelry and other intriguing items made by artisans in Haiti, the Philippines and other countries. Founded in 2007, the company specializes in "ethically sourced imports," which combines Reich's love of travel with her social-justice background in the labor movement. What prompted you to start the company?
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