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By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2004
GARDEZ, Afghanistan - They lay scattered on the hillside in twisted heaps yesterday, feet missing, legs spun at odd angles, faces blackened, torsos striped white with powder burns. One of the soldiers was little more than a collection of charred cloth and jumbled parts, held together by frayed thread and sinew. Another stretched out on his side among a patch of dry grass, as though weary and napping. When they picked him up, he sagged in places where his bones should have been. This was not the carnage of battle, but the lethal legacy of decades of other wars.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
Underwater surveys of the shoreline along a state park in Southern Maryland turned up eight more World War II-era military explosives, according to fire officials. More than 18 pieces of military ordnance — artillery shells — have been found over the last week near the shore of Newtowne Neck State Park in Leonardtown, according to a statement Tuesday from the Office of the State Fire Marshal. The eight rounds found during the sweep Tuesday were 57 mm rounds. They were all found underwater.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
Underwater surveys of the shoreline along a state park in Southern Maryland turned up eight more World War II-era military explosives, according to fire officials. More than 18 pieces of military ordnance — artillery shells — have been found over the last week near the shore of Newtowne Neck State Park in Leonardtown, according to a statement Tuesday from the Office of the State Fire Marshal. The eight rounds found during the sweep Tuesday were 57 mm rounds. They were all found underwater.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 2007
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army struck a three-member Palestinian rocket-launching cell near Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip yesterday, first with tank shells and then from the air, an army spokesman said. Residents said that the three were shepherds and that three other people had been wounded, Reuters reported. Hours later, the Palestinian faction Hamas claimed responsibility for firing an anti-tank missile at an Israeli army bulldozer that was accompanying tanks stationed in Gaza, close to the border with Israel.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 20, 2007
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army struck a three-member Palestinian rocket-launching cell near Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip yesterday, first with tank shells and then from the air, an army spokesman said. Residents said that the three were shepherds and that three other people had been wounded, Reuters reported. Hours later, the Palestinian faction Hamas claimed responsibility for firing an anti-tank missile at an Israeli army bulldozer that was accompanying tanks stationed in Gaza, close to the border with Israel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
KIRKUK, Iraq - Equipment plundered from dozens of sites in Saddam Hussein's vast complex for manufacturing weapons is beginning to surface in open markets in Iraq's major cities and at border crossings. Looters stormed the sites two years ago when Hussein's government fell, and the fate of much of the equipment has remained a mystery. But on a recent day, pieces of large machine tools that investigators say formed the heart of a factory that made artillery shells near Baghdad were resting in great chunks on a weedy lot in front of an Iraqi Border Patrol warehouse in Munthriya, on the Iranian border.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | February 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- U.S. and allied troops in the Persian Gulf face potentially serious ammunition shortages in a ground war, according to congressional, Pentagon and arms industry sources.For some munitions, less than a 10-day anticipated wartime supply is available anywhere in U.S. stocks, according to one government official familiar with ammunition inventories. For RTC others, the substitute round that troops will use once the preferred munition runs out is dramatically inferior."We've got a lot of everything except the bullets we need to shoot," Sen. Alan J. Dixon, D-Ill.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Out in the wilds of Fort Meade's old firing ranges, a team of demolitions experts carefully sweeps a 40-square-acre field for unexploded artillery shells.The retired military men line up and walk seven-abreast, sticking red flags in the ground to mark spots where the monotonous squeal of the sensitive detectors indicate metal buried up to 25 feet deep.On any given day, they can cover about 3 square acres. Everything depends on what they find, which can be anything from unexploded grenades and 2-inch rocket warheads to old wire and shrapnel that can't be identified.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2005
BAQUBAH, Iraq - The chaplain and the medic noticed it first: a pile of freshly upturned soil at the side of the highway. The two men were part of a combat engineer patrol searching for roadside bombs, the leading killer of U.S. troops in Iraq. Riding inside a "Buffalo," an armor-plated vehicle with a mechanical boom, they stopped to investigate. A claw on the boom tore into the dirt and unearthed two artillery shells wired to a blast pack and a cell phone, the components of a remote-controlled bomb known as an IED, or improvised explosive device.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Edward Paul Moylan, 63, IWIF claims directorEdward Paul Moylan, retired director of claims for the state Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, died Wednesday of lung cancer at North Arundel Hospital. He was 63 and lived in Glen Burnie.The Baltimore native left high school in 1953 and enlisted in the Army. He spent three years in Europe defusing mines, bombs and artillery shells -- among them, a World War I German mustard gas shell that discharged in his face in Verdun, France, and permanently scarred his lungs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
KIRKUK, Iraq - Equipment plundered from dozens of sites in Saddam Hussein's vast complex for manufacturing weapons is beginning to surface in open markets in Iraq's major cities and at border crossings. Looters stormed the sites two years ago when Hussein's government fell, and the fate of much of the equipment has remained a mystery. But on a recent day, pieces of large machine tools that investigators say formed the heart of a factory that made artillery shells near Baghdad were resting in great chunks on a weedy lot in front of an Iraqi Border Patrol warehouse in Munthriya, on the Iranian border.
NEWS
By David Zucchino and David Zucchino,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 27, 2005
BAQUBAH, Iraq - The chaplain and the medic noticed it first: a pile of freshly upturned soil at the side of the highway. The two men were part of a combat engineer patrol searching for roadside bombs, the leading killer of U.S. troops in Iraq. Riding inside a "Buffalo," an armor-plated vehicle with a mechanical boom, they stopped to investigate. A claw on the boom tore into the dirt and unearthed two artillery shells wired to a blast pack and a cell phone, the components of a remote-controlled bomb known as an IED, or improvised explosive device.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2004
GARDEZ, Afghanistan - They lay scattered on the hillside in twisted heaps yesterday, feet missing, legs spun at odd angles, faces blackened, torsos striped white with powder burns. One of the soldiers was little more than a collection of charred cloth and jumbled parts, held together by frayed thread and sinew. Another stretched out on his side among a patch of dry grass, as though weary and napping. When they picked him up, he sagged in places where his bones should have been. This was not the carnage of battle, but the lethal legacy of decades of other wars.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
An Army ordinance disposal team was dispatched from Fort Meade to Arundel Mills mall Wednesday afternoon to remove an unexploded World War I-era artillery shell found on the site. Construction workers digging to install curbs unearthed the 75 mm shell on the western side of the mall property, near the military base, and called county firefighters, who arrived at the scene, 7600 Clark Road, about 3:48 p.m. The firefighters called in bomb technicians from the state fire marshal's office.
NEWS
March 15, 1999
Edward Paul Moylan, 63, IWIF claims directorEdward Paul Moylan, retired director of claims for the state Injured Workers' Insurance Fund, died Wednesday of lung cancer at North Arundel Hospital. He was 63 and lived in Glen Burnie.The Baltimore native left high school in 1953 and enlisted in the Army. He spent three years in Europe defusing mines, bombs and artillery shells -- among them, a World War I German mustard gas shell that discharged in his face in Verdun, France, and permanently scarred his lungs.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 22, 1996
CHAATIYE, Lebanon -- The stubborn and the old, the zealous and the careless, those who stayed in southern Lebanon came out to scan the sky yesterday looking to see if diplomats had yet brought relief from the barrage.From the porch of her house in Chaatiye, a Hezbollah stronghold in South Lebanon, Rafiya Ali Fayad tended her roses and said that diplomacy and the end of the 11-day Israeli bombardment were both matters too big to worry about.Israel had told a half-million Lebanese to flee their homes, and announced that anyone remaining would be considered a Hezbollah target.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 22, 1996
CHAATIYE, Lebanon -- The stubborn and the old, the zealous and the careless, those who stayed in southern Lebanon came out to scan the sky yesterday looking to see if diplomats had yet brought relief from the barrage.From the porch of her house in Chaatiye, a Hezbollah stronghold in South Lebanon, Rafiya Ali Fayad tended her roses and said that diplomacy and the end of the 11-day Israeli bombardment were both matters too big to worry about.Israel had told a half-million Lebanese to flee their homes, and announced that anyone remaining would be considered a Hezbollah target.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
&TC A group of children found an unexploded artillery shell partially buried in the back yard of a Pasadena home yesterday.A state fire official confirmed that the rusted 77mm shell dated before World War II. Though the warhead was attached, Deputy State Fire Marshal Richard Brocco could not say whether the bomb could detonate.Brandon Leddon, 6, found the shell about 3:30 p.m. while playing with friends and siblings in his back yard in the 100 block of Waldo Road in Laurel Acres."He said, 'Mom, look what I found.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
&TC A group of children found an unexploded artillery shell partially buried in the back yard of a Pasadena home yesterday.A state fire official confirmed that the rusted 77mm shell dated before World War II. Though the warhead was attached, Deputy State Fire Marshal Richard Brocco could not say whether the bomb could detonate.Brandon Leddon, 6, found the shell about 3:30 p.m. while playing with friends and siblings in his back yard in the 100 block of Waldo Road in Laurel Acres."He said, 'Mom, look what I found.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Out in the wilds of Fort Meade's old firing ranges, a team of demolitions experts carefully sweeps a 40-square-acre field for unexploded artillery shells.The retired military men line up and walk seven-abreast, sticking red flags in the ground to mark spots where the monotonous squeal of the sensitive detectors indicate metal buried up to 25 feet deep.On any given day, they can cover about 3 square acres. Everything depends on what they find, which can be anything from unexploded grenades and 2-inch rocket warheads to old wire and shrapnel that can't be identified.
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