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By RICHARD LOUV | February 16, 1994
O thou, the early author of myblood,/!Whose youthful spirit, in meregenerate.Doth with his lofty and)shrill-sounding throatAwake the snorting like a horse.--Text generated with artificial intelligence, from what computer scientists call ''the Shakespeare corpus.''San Diego.--Sometimes worlds converge, explode and create new one. Lately, I have been wondering what will happen when the worlds of high definition television (or, better yet, the three-dimensional hologram), digital sound, artificial intelligence and theories of virtual reality converge with the yearnings of the human heart.
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NEWS
October 23, 2012
Dr. Rondalyn Whitney, of Towson, was recently named assistant professor of occupational therapy at the University of the Sciences, in Philadelphia. Previously, she served as the senior research coordinator at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. At Kennedy Krieger, Whitney's work focused on social skills intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders, and she innovated projects related to the use of artificial intelligence and scenario-based education to optimize learning for students with social deficits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Katie Hafner and Katie Hafner,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2001
Just what constitutes artificial intelligence has always been a matter of dispute. And the terms of the argument change with each new advance in computer science. Seen one way, as the effort to produce machines whose output cannot be distinguished from that of a human, artificial intelligence, or AI, is still very far away. But from another perspective, it is all around us. Thirty years ago, for instance, speech recognition was an artificial-intelligence problem of the first order. Today, it is commonplace, a fact that is evident to anyone who has called the United Airlines flight information line or has used speech transcription software.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Who would have thought that the revival of a creaky TV space opera like Battlestar Galactica would have meaningful lessons to teach about human rights, terrorism and reconciliation? But this complex and intellectually challenging narrative series has delivered all of that and more through four award-winning seasons that will end with its final episode tonight. Battlestar Galactica's explorations of faith, politics and terror have struck so painfully close to home that the United Nations hosted a special panel this week to discuss human rights issues raised by the series.
NEWS
July 29, 1995
Murray S. Miron, 62, a psychologist and specialist on terrorism who advised law enforcement agencies on the Unabomber, Branch Davidians, Patty Hearst and the Son of Sam, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer in Syracuse, N.Y.David G. Hays, 66, a social scientist and early practitioner of the budding discipline of computational linguistics, died Wednesday of lung cancer in White Plains, N.Y. Computer-aided linguistics -- akin to artificial intelligence --...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 26, 1994
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- A computer took home the title as the world's best checkers player yesterday, but it left artificial intelligence researchers without the decisive victory they had hoped would demonstrate the advances of their field.The machine, called Chinook, fended off a challenge by playing the No. 2-ranked human player to tie yesterday.Chinook, a program running on a computer made by Silicon Graphics Inc., and Don Lafferty each won one game during the tournament and they tied 18 times.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
Dr. Rondalyn Whitney, of Towson, was recently named assistant professor of occupational therapy at the University of the Sciences, in Philadelphia. Previously, she served as the senior research coordinator at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. At Kennedy Krieger, Whitney's work focused on social skills intervention for children with autism spectrum disorders, and she innovated projects related to the use of artificial intelligence and scenario-based education to optimize learning for students with social deficits.
NEWS
March 17, 2008
JOSEPH WEIZENBAUM, 85 Artificial intelligence pioneer Joseph Weizenbaum, a computer programmer who helped advance artificial intelligence only to become a critic of the technology later in his life, died March 5 of complications from stomach cancer at a daughter's home in Groeben, Germany, said Miriam Weizenbaum, one of his four daughters. Dr. Weizenbaum was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the mid-1960s when he developed ELIZA - named after Eliza Doolittle, the heroine of My Fair Lady - which became his best-known contribution to computer programming.
NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | June 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- No sooner had IBM's Deep Blue whipped chess champion Garry Kasparov than the question came, ''Can machines think?'' Many of the experts answered, ''No.'' They said that Deep's activity wasn't really thinking, it was just the ''brute force'' of calculations made possible by so much computing power (200 million operations per second!). That isn't really thinking, the argument went: A computer is just ''a big dumb adding machine.''Daniel Dennet, director of the Tufts University Center for Cognitive Studies, puts the topic in a different light.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | September 10, 2006
Artificial intelligence subject of lecture The Anne Arundel Community College Institute for the Future will hold a brown-bag lunch lecture from 1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. tomorrow in the Center for Applied Learning and Technology, Room 100, 101 College Parkway. The topic will be "Artificial Intelligence in Education: an Emerging Trend and the Broader Future Implications." It will be led by Steven H. White. Registration is required. The event is free. Information: 410-777-2708 or http:--ola4.
NEWS
March 17, 2008
JOSEPH WEIZENBAUM, 85 Artificial intelligence pioneer Joseph Weizenbaum, a computer programmer who helped advance artificial intelligence only to become a critic of the technology later in his life, died March 5 of complications from stomach cancer at a daughter's home in Groeben, Germany, said Miriam Weizenbaum, one of his four daughters. Dr. Weizenbaum was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the mid-1960s when he developed ELIZA - named after Eliza Doolittle, the heroine of My Fair Lady - which became his best-known contribution to computer programming.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2007
Cambridge, Mass. -- Hugo Liu says he hates recipes. The whole concept seems hopelessly antiquated to a guy who starts cooking by sniffing spices and thinking. Yet he has invented a revolutionary way of developing them. He explores new tastes with a vengeance. To learn to appreciate kale recently, he consumed it steamed, boiled, sauteed, raw, pureed and even as a cocktail. Yet he believes the future lies in helping other people make food decisions not by mouth but with the click of a mouse.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | December 17, 2006
The Emotion Machine: Common-sense Thinking, Artificial Intelligence and the Future of the Human Mind Marvin Minsky Simon & Schuster / 387 pages / $26 Reality leaves a lot to the imagination," John Lennon once quipped. That may be why the human mind has developed so many different ways of responding to the external world. The brain, according to Marvin Minsky, a professor of media arts and sciences, electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, addresses problems by selecting from its tool kit of resources, which includes instincts, memories, analogies and "common sense.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | September 10, 2006
Artificial intelligence subject of lecture The Anne Arundel Community College Institute for the Future will hold a brown-bag lunch lecture from 1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m. tomorrow in the Center for Applied Learning and Technology, Room 100, 101 College Parkway. The topic will be "Artificial Intelligence in Education: an Emerging Trend and the Broader Future Implications." It will be led by Steven H. White. Registration is required. The event is free. Information: 410-777-2708 or http:--ola4.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
Awards Hongjun Song, an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering, was recently chosen for a McKnight Scholar Award by the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience. Song will receive $75,000 in research funding each year for the next three years to study how stem cells renew themselves, and how adult nerve stem cells become nerves. McKnight awards are granted to young neuroscientists in the early stages of establishing their own independent laboratories.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - This is it. It's real. A decades-old doctoral dissertation has grown into an actual product supported by a fledgling company, which on this early autumn day is being unveiled in a windowless ballroom several stories above the cab-choked streets of Times Square. The guys from Sonum Technologies Inc. are confident, but fidgety. They stand in their booth at the conference, jackets on, feet spread apart, eyes scanning the moving mass of vendors and middle-managers - a legion in golf shirts and dark suits.
NEWS
June 23, 2006
Awards Hongjun Song, an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Cell Engineering, was recently chosen for a McKnight Scholar Award by the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience. Song will receive $75,000 in research funding each year for the next three years to study how stem cells renew themselves, and how adult nerve stem cells become nerves. McKnight awards are granted to young neuroscientists in the early stages of establishing their own independent laboratories.
NEWS
March 20, 2009
Who would have thought that the revival of a creaky TV space opera like Battlestar Galactica would have meaningful lessons to teach about human rights, terrorism and reconciliation? But this complex and intellectually challenging narrative series has delivered all of that and more through four award-winning seasons that will end with its final episode tonight. Battlestar Galactica's explorations of faith, politics and terror have struck so painfully close to home that the United Nations hosted a special panel this week to discuss human rights issues raised by the series.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
Milan Stojanovic has a new tic-tac-toe adversary in his Columbia University laboratory, and after a hundred matches he has yet to beat it. "There's no way," he sighs. Who is this tic-tac titan? A computer, of course. Only here's the twist: its brain is based not on silicon microchips but on molecules of DNA. Strange as it seems, the double helix is turning into a growing draw for computer scientists. DNA is tiny - a trillion molecules squeeze into a single drop of water. It performs chemical reactions at blinding speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
BERKELEY, Calif. - Linda Kozuh thought she had seen it all in this offbeat town. Then she spotted the metallic contraption rolling down Telegraph Avenue near the University of California, Berkeley campus. That craning neck. That single retractable claw. And that computer monitor face - all in a 5-foot-tall package. "You're adorable," concluded Kozuh, poking her face within inches of the strange visitor. Say hello to Slats, the bumbling Bay Area robot that could fail even the most forgiving Star Wars casting call.
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