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Artificial Heart

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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
A fist-sized contraption of plastic and metal kept 63-year-old Grant Feusner alive for five weeks earlier this year, pumping blood from his chest to his brain, kidneys and muscles. Doctors had removed most of Feusner's heart, ballooned with disease and too weak to nourish his organs with oxygen and nutrients. It wasn't the first time Feusner's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had implanted such a device. Artificial hearts are designed to be used as a bridge from heart failure to heart transplant.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
Teresa Bartlinski, the Catonsville child whose life and courage captivated people worldwide, was borrowed from heaven to teach all a lesson in God's love, the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley said Saturday at her funeral. The 6-year-old girl, adopted from China by Ed and Ann Bartlinski, would throw her arms around strangers and ask how many flowers she could pick in heaven. On the day she received her first Holy Communion, she told her parents she was marrying Jesus. Now, Whatley, the parish priest at St. Mark Church, said Teresa can collect her "crown of glory, the crown of triumph.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
As they cradled her lifeless body Monday, Ed and Ann Bartlinski tried to picture their 6-year-old daughter on a bicycle pedaling toward heaven, to celebrate her life as a miracle, rather than see her death as a sign of unanswered prayers. Teresa Bartlinski, an effervescent child abandoned after birth in a village on the banks of China's Yellow River, died at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after doctors attempted to implant an artificial heart in her chest. Three years after her adoption by the Catonsville family, Teresa had already outlived everyone's expectations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Services for 6-year-old Teresa Bartlinski will be held at St. Mark Church in Catonsville on Friday and Saturday, the family's pastor said Tuesday. Viewings for the child, who died Monday at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, will be held Friday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., the Rev. Christopher J. Whatley said. The church is at 30 Melvin Avenue. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday. A burial in Woodlawn will follow. Teresa, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, died after an unsuccessful attempt by doctors to implant an artificial heart in her chest.
NEWS
By Richard A. Knox and Richard A. Knox,Boston Globe | May 14, 2000
Designing an artificial heart seems like a straightforward engineering problem. The heart, after all, is not a space shuttle. It has just one job to do: pump blood. But the agonizing early-1980s experiences of the first few people to have their failing hearts replaced by machines showed that it was anything but straightforward. The first artificial heart recipient, Utah dentist Barney Clark, died after 112 miserable days on a heart pump powered by a bedside box the size of a washing machine.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2006
Federal regulators approved yesterday the first fully implantable artificial heart, which is to be used by dying heart failure patients who are not eligible for transplants. The device, called AbioCor, was tested in 14 patients who lived an average of five months after receiving the mechanical heart. The Food and Drug Administration said it approved the artificial heart for humanitarian use, which means the device was not tested in large clinical trials but might benefit 4,000 or fewer people a year.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1982: Barney Clark: gets artificial heart1984: AIDS virus isolated1992: Dan Quayle chastizes single mom "Murphy Brown"
NEWS
January 15, 1993
Artificial heart:Artificial heart: Sharoyn Loughran, an Arizona woman who Monday became the nation's first artificial heart recipient in nearly two years, was taken off a respirator yesterday and listed in critical but stable condition.Ms. Loughran, 46, was awake but weak and was awaiting a human heart at the University of Arizona Medical Center, a hospital spokesman said. Her CardioWest air-driven heart was functioning properly.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
1982: Great Britain wins Falklands war1982: Barney Clark receives an artificial heart ...1983: ... He dies after 112 daysPub Date: 12/08/99
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1991
The Food and Drug Administration has given a Houston hospital approval to begin experimental use of a portable, battery-powered mechanical device to help a failing heart pump blood until a heart donor can be found.With the new device, the damaged organ stays in place.After patients awaiting heart transplants get the pump implanted, they are expected to be freely mobile because they will not be tethered to a cumbersome external console, as with earlier versions of the device and the Jarvik-7 artificial heart.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
As they cradled her lifeless body Monday, Ed and Ann Bartlinski tried to picture their 6-year-old daughter on a bicycle pedaling toward heaven, to celebrate her life as a miracle, rather than see her death as a sign of unanswered prayers. Teresa Bartlinski, an effervescent child abandoned after birth in a village on the banks of China's Yellow River, died at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after doctors attempted to implant an artificial heart in her chest. Three years after her adoption by the Catonsville family, Teresa had already outlived everyone's expectations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for rain and a high temperature near 84 degrees. Tonight is expected to be rainy, with a low temperature around 74 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Police investigated cannibalism suspect in machete report : Three weeks before Alexander Kinyua was charged with dismembering a family friend and eating some of the body parts, police at Morgan State University investigated a report that the suspect had a machete in his dorm room, school officials confirmed Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
A fist-sized contraption of plastic and metal kept 63-year-old Grant Feusner alive for five weeks earlier this year, pumping blood from his chest to his brain, kidneys and muscles. Doctors had removed most of Feusner's heart, ballooned with disease and too weak to nourish his organs with oxygen and nutrients. It wasn't the first time Feusner's doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center had implanted such a device. Artificial hearts are designed to be used as a bridge from heart failure to heart transplant.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2006
Federal regulators approved yesterday the first fully implantable artificial heart, which is to be used by dying heart failure patients who are not eligible for transplants. The device, called AbioCor, was tested in 14 patients who lived an average of five months after receiving the mechanical heart. The Food and Drug Administration said it approved the artificial heart for humanitarian use, which means the device was not tested in large clinical trials but might benefit 4,000 or fewer people a year.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
In a landmark operation that could lead to the saving of thousands of lives, doctors in Kentucky have implanted the world's first self-contained mechanical heart. It took seven hours for surgeons at the University of Louisville to implant the titanium-and-plastic pump, made by Abiomed Inc. of Danvers, Mass. Cardiologists and others who daily see the results of congestive heart failure - which kills about 46,000 Americans each year - called implantation of the AbioCor artificial heart a major scientific advance.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Doctors determined that Teresa Bartlinski, the 6-year-old Catonsville girl struggling to accept a donor's heart, will be re-listed on the transplant list. The family announced on their blog, ourplacecalledhome.blogspot.com, that Teresa will remain on life support at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia until Monday when she will receive an artificial heart to bridge the time until another donor heart is available. The child, who was born in China with a congenital heart disease, waited for nearly a year for the heart transplant she received less than two weeks ago. Teresa was adopted by a devout Roman Catholic family from Catonsville that has enlisted their church, St. Mark, and community to pray for a miracle.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 31, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - The government has given the go-ahead to a Massachusetts company to try its artificial heart in humans. Abiomed Inc. said yesterday it had received Food and Drug Administration approval to test AbioCor - the first totally implantable artificial heart - in five patients at five medical centers around the nation. The first device likely will be implanted during the first half of this year, said Edward Berger, the company's vice president for government and external relations.
NEWS
By Richard A. Knox and Richard A. Knox,Boston Globe | May 14, 2000
Designing an artificial heart seems like a straightforward engineering problem. The heart, after all, is not a space shuttle. It has just one job to do: pump blood. But the agonizing early-1980s experiences of the first few people to have their failing hearts replaced by machines showed that it was anything but straightforward. The first artificial heart recipient, Utah dentist Barney Clark, died after 112 miserable days on a heart pump powered by a bedside box the size of a washing machine.
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