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NEWS
October 17, 2003
On October 16, 2003, ARTIE XEDOS, beloved husband of the late Helen E. (nee Bender) Xedos, devoted father of Sharon M. Noel, Leon T. Xedos, Darlene F. Greoski, Richard N. and James Xedos. Loving grandfather of Tommy, Lori, Jason, Leslie, Bobby, Zoee and Stacie. Also survived by five great-grandchildrenFuneral service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Ave., on Saturday at 10 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. Friends may call on Friday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Artist Pablo Machioli hangs out in the belly of the letter "B. " Kyle Miller likes to linger in "U," a letter he helped shape from steel and pine. And bus driver Kaliha Taylor waits for her shift to begin while perched on the lower curve of "S. " Baltimore's most distinctive bus stop was unveiled late last month on the side of the Creative Alliance in Highlandtown. The trio of giant letters - which resemble a set piece from "Sesame Street" - has become a favorite spot for residents to lounge or pose for photos.
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NEWS
July 27, 2005
On July 25, 2005, ARTIE BEA HOGGS. Friends may call at the family owned MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST, INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Thursday after 1 P.M. Family will receive friends on Friday at Sharon Baptist Church, 1373 N. Stricker Street at 11:30 A.M., followed by funeral service at 12:30. See www.marchfh.com
ENTERTAINMENT
By Derek Chavis and For The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A wise man once sang the words “If I can make it there, I can make it anywhere! It's up to you New York, New York!” And he wasn't lying! Tonight, we join all of the McKinley High graduates as they are apparently a few months into their adventures in the Big Apple, the only one who seems to be truly enjoying herself is Rachel Berry. Her producer wants to thank her for being such a hard worker and good sport with Santana quitting, so he rewards her with 24/7 access to her very own Town Car. Rachel begins to lose sight of who she is and where she came from, as she tends to do once things are on the up and up for her. She opens the episode with the Petula Clark's 1964 hit song “Downtown,” and the rest of the cast joins in with her in their own respective adventures around the city.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 5, 2004; ARTIE LEE TRAIL; beloved brother of Wilma Trail, John Trail, Fannie Cousins, and Harold, Joyce, Chiquita, Jeanie and Becky Trail. Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue on Thursday and Friday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM. Services will be held Saturday at 11 AM at the funeral home. Internment Mt. Olive Cemetery.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 4, 2004
FORTY-FIVE YEARS ago, after his team won the world championship in sudden death overtime, Arthur Donovan, legendary Baltimore Colt and Falstaff of American football, invested his bonus in a country club without a golf course. But while the Valley Country Club, in the Riderwood area of Baltimore County, might not have had 18 holes and fabulous fairways, it had the grand, 19th-century hilltop manor house and 12 acres of a former dairy farm. With Artie Donovan's winnings from the December 1958 NFL championship, it soon had tennis courts, a snack bar, a clubhouse and the huge swimming pool that more than 400 members, their families and friends still enjoy each summer.
NEWS
July 30, 2005
Artie "Bea" Hoggs, a homemaker and former Baltimore resident, died of a heart attack Monday at Christiana Hospital in Wilmington, Del. She was 85. Artie Barrow was born and raised in Lafayette, Ala., and moved to Baltimore in the early 1940s. She was married in 1944 to the Rev. Oscar C. Hoggs, who is pastor of Salem Thessalonian Baptist Church on Druid Hill Avenue. Mrs. Hoggs lived in the city's Rosemont neighborhood until moving to Bear, Del., in 2001. "She loved cooking and entertaining family and friends, and was known for her cornbread, sweet potato pie and fried chicken that was better than the Colonel's," said a granddaughter, Danielle R. Darring of Bear.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 9, 1990
Art Donovan is standing before me in the considerable flesh, wearing the usual deadpan look on that basset-hound face. "Now you write a good article," he says in his Bronx yawp. And he shakes a meaty fist, the same one that once clubbed its way past a generation of National Football League offensive linemen on Donovan's way to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.Well, OK, Artie, even though I know you were just kidding (you were, weren't you?), here we go:The occasion of our meeting was a taping of "Braase, Donovan and Fans," a production of local sportscaster Tom Davis, who also serves as host.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 26, 1995
Mounted on the back wall of the set for Fell's Point Corner Theatre's production of "Eleemosynary" are two white, fabric-covered trapezoidal shapes. They turn out to be wings, created by an eccentric character named Dorothea, who is convinced that man can fly."The secret of flight lies in the assurance that we are worthy of flying," Dorothea says. Heavily weighted with metaphor, it's a typical line in Lee Blessing's feminist play about three generations of women in an intellectually gifted but emotionally challenged family.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | June 4, 1991
Beware the power of the misbegotten dream. Illusions may be dangerous, but reality can be downright fatal.Jay Gatsby and Willy Loman found out the hard way. Nobody's ever come up with an uptempo musicalversion of "The Iceman Cometh," either.John Guare's play, "House of Blue Leaves," a dark, bizarre, jarringly funny, achingly sad play currently at The Colonial Players of Annapolis, explores the fine line between the regenerative and degenerative powers of dreams. It leaves its audience laughed-out, wrung-out and more than a little stunned by its conclusion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
Every year at the American Craft Council Show in Baltimore, rows and rows of handmade material sit in booths for on-lookers to gaze at and admire. And behind the uniquely crafted jewelry and perfectly glazed ceramic pieces sits an artist, whose work on each piece is extensive. The artists spend hours designing their collections, carving their materials and sewing their pieces together. The show returns to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend to showcase more 650 craft artists from all over the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Derek Chavis and For the Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Welcome back to the wonderful world of "Glee," folks. Let's start with the elephant in the room. You may have realized at some point that something was slightly off. Was it the fact that Artie, Blaine, Tina and Sam were still there? Was it the fact that prom was being talked about prematurely? Was it the fact that Rachel still didn't know anything about "Funny Girl" or that the episode never once addressed the fact that we had spent the last three months away from this lovable cast of characters?
NEWS
August 6, 2013
Some years ago I was flying from Baltimore to Pittsburgh and ended up across the aisle from Artie Donovan ( "Art Donovan, vocal ex-Colts defensive tackle, dies at 89," Aug. 5). I said hello and asked a question. Shortly thereafter all the seats around Artie were filled as he regaled us with story after story. Soon the cabin crew forced us to leave the plane. We all wished we had been on a flight to Los Angeles. I returned that evening, and while checking in for the flight I was in line behind Johnny Unitas . I said hello and noted that this was my Colt day, as I had flown up with Artie.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 5, 2013
The first time I met Artie Donovan, I got all of it - a big serving of his affable nature, his way of taking genuine interest in a complete stranger, a dose of his amazing memory and his way of connecting life experiences with the food and drink that accompanied them. This was 25 years ago. I was supposed to interview Hall of Famer Donovan, but he started off with questions for me instead. He recognized my New England accent. "Where are you from?" he asked. When I told him my native state was Massachusetts, he wanted to know what town.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Jamel Artis ' affinity for Pittsburgh was never a secret. Ever since the Baltimore native's recruitment began, the Panthers were “on top” of his list of potential college destinations. As Artis moved through four schools in five years, the Pittsburgh coaching staff stayed persistent in its recruitment of the 6-foot-6, 230-pound wing.   “They showed that they wanted me more than all the other schools,” Artis said Tuesday. “I was just waiting for the right time.” The right time came last weekend, when Artis - who recently achieved a qualifying SAT score - pledged to the Panthers during his official visit.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 4, 1990
"Some of these games, I don't know," Artie Donovan was saying. "Like Sunday night, they have the Vikings and Packers on television, and I'm supposed to watch that? Who cares? It's like watching Tampa Bay against the Poor Sisters of the Sick. It's a waste of God-given time."Sort of the same as flying to California to be on Johnny Carson, and then not getting brought out until there are two minutes left in the show. That happened to Artie last month."This girl said they'd love to have me back," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Subscribers and friends of Compass Rose Theater Company had major cause for celebration last month with the opening of the troupe's new theater home in the Annapolis Arts District. The redeveloped 2,900-square-foot space at 49 Spa Road now has a full lobby, classroom, library and a large backstage area for performers and dressing rooms, with a ceiling height of 25 feet and a 10-by-25-foot stage. Designed by Severna Park-based theater architect Gary Martinez, the theater comfortably seats 70. Martinez described it as "a dynamic space for a dynamic company," and Lucinda Merry-Browne, founder and artistic director of Compass Rose, called the theater "the realization of the dream of a lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
At the beginning of this film-inspired "Glee," we find Will and Emma dancing around all Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers-like to "You're All the World to Me" in old school black and white. But wait...didn't y'all essentially break up? I'm confused. But that's when we find out it's just a dream. In an effort to make himself feel better after Emma left him at the altar, he's been watching old movies, which serves as the inspiration for this week's theme. To be perfectly honest, I'd kind of forgotten that Will was actually in charge of New Directions and not Finn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By L'Oreal Thompson | December 13, 2012
So apparently this week's episode is supposed to be based on the holiday movie "Love Actually;" thus, the title. But, seeing as how I've never seen it from beginning to end and I don't remember exactly what happens, I can't quite reference the similarities. So you'll have to forgive me. Or find another recap. I won't be offended. If you, however, decide to stay, thank you. So we begin the episode with Artie all banged up and bruised because he fell. Alas, the janitor had not yet applied salt to the sidewalk and our beloved Artie took a tumble.
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