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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Responding to 81 questions from the congressional impeachment committee, President Clinton has again denied that he lied under oath when he testified about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky.The president's written responses were sent yesterday to Rep. Henry J. Hyde, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, whose staff is preparing possible articles of impeachment against Clinton. The articles could include charges of perjury, obstruction of justice and abuse of power.The full House may vote on the matter as early as the middle of next month.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - The other day, I quoted some e-mails calling for the impeachment of President Bush on grounds he misrepresented or lied about an imminent threat from weapons of mass destruction to justify invading Iraq. Why, some other readers immediately asked, didn't I use the "I-word" myself? An e-mailer from Los Angeles wrote: "You seem to be perfectly willing to use the word impeachment when you can attribute it to a reader. Why not go on record in your own words?" Another asked: "Why not mention impeachment yourself in your articles?
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NEWS
By Charles Levendosky | December 15, 1998
THE Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee have made it clear that the impeachment action against President Clinton is a payback for the impeachment articles drawn up against Richard Nixon. Nothing more, nothing less.Committee member Rep. Howard Coble, a North Carolina Republican, gleefully pointed this out Friday in his reference to the Nixon impeachment when the Democrats were in the majority in Congress: "It's a lot easier to throw grenades than to catch them."The GOP's need for revenge was going to corner a Democratic president, any Democratic president -- when the GOP controlled Congress and the time was right.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With three Republican senators saying they will vote to acquit President Clinton on both articles of impeachment, the likelihood grew yesterday that neither article will draw even a simple majority of votes, much less the two-thirds required to convict the president.Before the Senate concluded its second day of closed-door deliberations, the three Republicans -- James M. Jeffords of Vermont, Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and John H. Chafee of Rhode Island -- announced that they would vote to acquit on the perjury charge and the obstruction of justice charge.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott urged Democrats yesterday to "calm down" and not rush forward with a censure deal for President Clinton, saying the Senate must hear a full presentation of the evidence before deciding his fate."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 28, 1998
With serious talk of impeachment on people's lips for the second time in less than 25 years, leave it to History Channel to show us the context.Beginning today, the cable channel will broadcast 25 hours of the 1974 House Judiciary Committee hearings on charges against Richard Nixon stemming from the Watergate burglary and subsequent cover-up.Besides committee chairman Peter Rodino and Maryland congressman (now senator) Paul Sarbanes, a host of familiar faces can be seen in the 24-year-old footage, including several who could figure prominently in any similar proceedings against President Clinton.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For the second time in 24 years, the House Judiciary Committee stands poised to vote one or more articles of impeachment against a sitting president. Memories of the first experience haunt the second.Then as now, a Congress controlled by one party was seeking the ouster of a twice-elected president of the opposition party. Then as now, the president seemed to be his own worst enemy.But President Clinton's defenders in the past few days have repeatedly taken America back to that bleak period in 1974 -- when three impeachment articles were voted against President Richard M. Nixon -- to argue that Clinton should not suffer the same fate.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With three Republican senators saying they will vote to acquit President Clinton on both articles of impeachment, the likelihood grew yesterday that neither article will draw even a simple majority of votes, much less the two-thirds required to convict the president.Before the Senate concluded its second day of closed-door deliberations, the three Republicans -- James M. Jeffords of Vermont, Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania and John H. Chafee of Rhode Island -- announced that they would vote to acquit on the perjury charge and the obstruction of justice charge.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 13, 1999
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland struck a judicious tone yesterday in commenting on President Clinton's Senate impeachment trial, but still raised doubts about the strength of the case being presented by the House Republican prosecutors."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Republicans in the House have boxed themselves into an awkward political corner in their pursuit of President Clinton.If they bring articles of impeachment to the floor of the House of Representatives but then fail to pass them, they will allow the White House to claim total exoneration for the president.Such a claim would be as thin as clam broth, but the fine print soon is forgotten by many Americans. There are a lot of people who should know better who believe Richard M. Nixon was an injured party, not a guilty felon in the Watergate case simply because he was pardoned by President Gerald R. Ford shortly after leaving office.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- With President Clinton's acquittal virtually assured, the Senate rebuffed a motion yesterday for public deliberations, closed its doors and began weighing an impeachment verdict that is expected to be reached by tomorrow.The senators are thought to be far short of the 67 votes needed to convict Clinton of either perjury or obstruction of justice and remove a president for the first time in U.S. history.Away from public view, the mood inside the chamber yesterday turned somber, several senators said, as members who had been sitting silently for nearly a month listening to lawyers' arguments finally got a chance to exchange views on whether the House Republican prosecutors' case justifies Clinton's removal.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Paul West and Karen Hosler and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Rejecting Democratic protests, Senate Republicans imposed rules last night for President Clinton's impeachment trial that could lead to testimony by Monica Lewinsky before the Senate -- at least by videotape.The rules, approved by a mostly party-line vote, set the stage for the public release of videotaped depositions of the witnesses approved Wednesday, including Lewinsky.The procedures also leave open the prospect that the Senate could approve a "findings of fact" motion that would say Clinton lied under oath and "obstructed and impeded justice" when he testified to a federal grand jury and took certain actions in the Paula Corbin Jones sexual misconduct case.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The bipartisan glow that surrounded the opening of President Clinton's Senate impeachment trial may be about to go out.Barely three weeks since the senators agreed unanimously to begin the trial, they are scrambling to avoid what threatens to be an undignified break today into two battling camps.A sharp partisan divide is propelling the Senate toward two key votes, with the outcome to fall almost strictly along party lines.A Democratic motion to dismiss the impeachment charges, never given much chance of passing, is not expected to draw even one Republican vote.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Legend has it that Sen. Robert C. Byrd fiddled his way into public office.As a young candidate for the state legislature, Byrd would ride around the West Virginia hills with his fiddle and bow, so charming crowds with tunes like "Cripple Creek" and "Rye Whiskey" that they stayed for his campaign message and have elected him ever since.Five decades later, the fiddle is long retired. But Byrd still often calls the tune in the U.S. Senate.His surprise announcement Friday that he would seek a quick end to the impeachment trial of President Clinton, because he considers it a futile and destructive exercise, marked a swift change in the dynamic on the Senate floor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 22, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's legal team ended yesterday a three-day defense that appeared to turn the tide decisively in his favor, concluding a relentless dissection of the charges with a personal, passionate appeal for senators to end a national "nightmare."In an extraordinary, emotional conclusion, retired Arkansas Sen. Dale Bumpers alternately humored, flattered and entertained his former Senate colleagues, asking them not only to leave the president in office but to show a touch of compassion for a man and his family who have suffered through "nothing but sleepless nights and mental agony."
NEWS
January 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Few points of difference between the two sides in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton are as potentially decisive as their divergent views about the lawsuit that started the scandal: the Paula Corbin Jones sexual misconduct case. The president's defense team began outlining its view yesterday. Lyle Denniston of The Sun's national staff examines the differences.Jones' lawsuit was dismissed in April by a judge, and her appeal ended Dec. 2 after the suit had been settled out of court.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Charging toward a showdown on the Senate floor, the White House formally responded yesterday to the House articles of impeachment, contending that they are unconstitutionally vague, illegally worded and completely false.But the president's lawyers declined to file motions that might have delayed the start of opening arguments, scheduled for Thursday."We believe the public has had enough of this," said Joe Lockhart, the White House spokesman. "We're at the final stage of this process, and we can do it two ways: We can do it fairly and expeditiously, or we can do it fairly in a process that's open-ended and takes months and months."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Susan Baer contributed to this article | December 30, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As senators struggled yesterday to decide how quickly to conduct a trial of President Clinton, leaders of the House impeachment drive argued for the chance to make a full presentation of their case, complete with testimony from witnesses.Trent Lott, the Senate majority leader, floated a proposal for a two-week trial next month that would conclude with a vote on whether to remove Clinton from office. If less than the necessary two-thirds of the Senate voted to convict, a lesser sanction, such as censure, could be taken up."
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 13, 1999
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland struck a judicious tone yesterday in commenting on President Clinton's Senate impeachment trial, but still raised doubts about the strength of the case being presented by the House Republican prosecutors."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 12, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Charging toward a showdown on the Senate floor, the White House formally responded yesterday to the House articles of impeachment, contending that they are unconstitutionally vague, illegally worded and completely false.But the president's lawyers declined to file motions that might have delayed the start of opening arguments, scheduled for Thursday."We believe the public has had enough of this," said Joe Lockhart, the White House spokesman. "We're at the final stage of this process, and we can do it two ways: We can do it fairly and expeditiously, or we can do it fairly in a process that's open-ended and takes months and months."
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