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By Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
Today The Baltimore Sun is introducing a new typeface that will replace the current font used for the text of stories. The typeface is designed to improve the legibility of text in two ways: It prints a little darker and there is more space in between lines. The space between lines is intended to make reading easier by creating a less cramped appearance. Some other minor changes will accompany this design update, such as a bolder version of the same typeface for writers' names at the beginning of articles.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
Thank you to The Sun for your hard-hitting, front page article highlighting the abuse of power by some members of the Baltimore City Police Department ("Undue force," Sept. 28). "A disturbing pattern" and "frightful human toll" are apt expressions used in the article to which we must add "unacceptable racist practices against African Americans" to seemingly describe a culture in the Baltimore City Police Department which we all know continues to this day. We citizens of Baltimore need proof that severe measures are being taken to correct Baltimore's "national reputation of not being a professional and effective department," as you state in the article.
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thank you so much for your article on Catonsville United Methodist Church's beautification project ("Replacing old trees part of plan for future," Catonsville Times, March 19). You did a wonderful job explaining our mission in both replacing the trees and for the new Prayer Garden. As we discussed, I think the Catonsville Times' readership is a knowledgeable group that looks for you to give them insight into important issues in our community. Your reporting inputs from Councilman Tom Quirk and Jim Himel of the Catonsville Tree Canopy Project hopefully gave readers an even better understanding of how this project will benefit the Greater Catonsville community.  Ken Erickson,  facilities manager Catonsville United Methodist Church 
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Earlier today I commented on an article by Anne Curzan on people's objections to legitly , suggesting that you might want to lighten up.  But I know that slang leaves some of you tetchy, and, ever the helpful editor, I'd like to offer some relief.  Send me some of the slang words and cant phrases that go up your nose. I will use them in posts at this site. Once the Young People witness a palpable geezer adopting them, that will be the end. Think that that is just too cray-cray to work?
NEWS
July 12, 2011
Re: "Teenagers in The White House," (July 10), it's interesting how one example of teenagers in the White House was left out of the compilation. While names like Monroe, Lincoln, Carter and Clinton are cited, the Bush twins are totally ignored. But it's not really surprising, seeing what side of the political fence The Baltimore Sun is on, practically choking up in their descriptions of the Obama clan. Cheryl Herman, Pikesville
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 13, 2013
Editor:  I am writing in regards to the recent article published in The Aegis about the Civil War and my complete distaste for it. While I enjoy reading stories and articles about history, your article seemed to revere the Confederate soldiers. It is a complete a slap in the face to ANY American whose ancestors were slaves!  As I read it I wondered if you would have written the article for a Nazi soldier in the same fashion.  When anyone tries to whitewash the Holocaust they are immediately shunned, as they should be!
NEWS
December 5, 1997
Diana K. Sugg, a reporter for The Sun, was named winner yesterday of the 1997 A. D. Emmart Memorial Prize for "The Forever Children," a March 23 article on an aging man's struggle to care for his 43-year-old disabled son.Her article also won the 1997 Community Media Excellence Award, one of two awards given annually by The Arc of the United States, a national organization on mental retardation.The Emmart prize of $1,000 honors writing in the humanities published in a Maryland general-readership newspaper or magazine.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
The on-again, off-again public spat between Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is on again, prompted by a blistering letter Jessamy sent to Esquire magazine deriding its laudatory article about O'Malley. Jessamy's two-page letter, sent to Esquire on Friday, is in response to an article in the magazine's "Best and Brightest" issue dubbing O'Malley "the best young mayor in America." The issue hit the newsstands last week. The magazine piece says O'Malley is dashing, frenetic and constructively explosive, while it says Jessamy "embodies the old-line culture of excuses."
NEWS
By Daniel Hernandez and Daniel Hernandez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 2003
VENICE, Calif. - This semester's final edition of Venice High School's student newspaper hit the stand last week, with one article conspicuously absent. Instead, the top headline read: "The Oarsman is Censored." For months, two Oarsman reporters collected records for a planned investigative story about a teacher who, a decade ago, had a relationship with a movie actor when the teacher was in her late 20s and the actor was a teen-ager. Their story used court filings, police records and other documents to detail the relationship between Terminator 2 star Edward Furlong and Jacqueline Domac, who teaches health at the school.
NEWS
By James Rainey and James Rainey,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2008
A Los Angeles Times article about a brutal 1994 attack on rap superstar Tupac Shakur was partially based on documents that appear to have been fabricated, the reporter and editor responsible for the article said Wednesday. Reporter Chuck Philips and his supervisor, Deputy Managing Editor Marc Duvoisin, issued statements of apology Wednesday afternoon. The statements came after the Times took withering criticism for the Shakur article, which appeared on latimes.com last week and two days later in the newspaper.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
A recent article at Slate  by Gretchen McCulloch, "Why Do You Think You're Right About Language? You're Not,"  prompts some fruitful thinking about idiolects.  An idiolect is " not just vocabulary; it's everything from how we pronounce certain words to how we put them together to what we imagine they mean. " It's the whole set of associations from regional origins, family habits of language, education, reading, and jobs.  And English, the macro language, is the sum total of all our respective idiolects; it's crowdsourced.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Louise Mullan Flanigan, who owned and operated the Ambassador Gift Shop for six decades in a landmark Tuscany-Canterbury apartment house her father built, died Saturday in her sleep of undetermined causes at Blakehurst Retirement Community. She was 101 and had lived in Guilford. Born Clementine Louise Mullan in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Thomas F. Mullan, a builder, and his wife, Clementine L. Mullen, a homemaker. Her father was an original owner of the Baltimore Colts and was later treasurer of the Baltimore Orioles, beginning in the 1954 season.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
At Poynter today we find an item about how far a newspaper correction should go .  An editor at the Toronto Star  inserted an error into a reporter's article. The correction identified the error but not who perpetrated it, and the newspaper's ombudsman, Kathy English, has commented on the matter , suggesting that greater transparency would be appropriate.  The Star , like many newspapers, takes collective responsibility for what it publishes and does not go in for finger-pointing when it corrects errors.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Pilots use checklists before they take off. Surgeons use checklists before they operate. Checklists are a good idea, and copy editors might well benefit from them. Mignon Fogarty, the indefatigable Grammar Girl, has introduced a checklist for editors  that you are well advised to take into consideration.  But The Old Editor fears that in your attention to individual trees you might lose your way in the forest. Thus, in addition to Grammar Girl's micro-editing checklist, you might benefit from The Old Editor's macro-editing checklist.    FOCUS If the opening is a summary paragraph, does it say one thing  clearly and directly?
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Thank you so much for your article on Catonsville United Methodist Church's beautification project ("Replacing old trees part of plan for future," Catonsville Times, March 19). You did a wonderful job explaining our mission in both replacing the trees and for the new Prayer Garden. As we discussed, I think the Catonsville Times' readership is a knowledgeable group that looks for you to give them insight into important issues in our community. Your reporting inputs from Councilman Tom Quirk and Jim Himel of the Catonsville Tree Canopy Project hopefully gave readers an even better understanding of how this project will benefit the Greater Catonsville community.  Ken Erickson,  facilities manager Catonsville United Methodist Church 
NEWS
March 25, 2014
I enjoyed the article on Maryland's efforts to persuade federal officials to move the new FBI headquarters to Maryland ( "Md. in battle for FBI offices," March 24). According to the article, some 11,000 employees would work in the new headquarters which would be a real plum for the state. Virginia, of course, is also eager to see the new headquarters located in Northern Virginia. Not to worry, Gov. Martin O'Malley has assigned to Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown the responsibility to land the new headquarters.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
A Baltimore trial lawyer is again calling for the board that regulates Maryland physicians to investigate Dr. Ghevont W. Wartanian, an obstetrician-gynecologist who has been hit with 18 malpractice suits during the past two decades. The lawyer, Daniel M. Clements, said he was filing the formal request for an investigation on behalf of a half-dozen women who came forward as the result of a front-page article in The Sun last week about the doctor's malpractice history. The article raised questions about the way Maryland regulates physicians.
NEWS
August 7, 2007
ARTICLE, PG 1D
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Despite all the opinions I have read recently, I was still stunned by the anti-marijuana-legalization screed in your paper arguing we should continue marijuana prohibition because alcohol prohibition was so successful ("Supporters of marijuana legalization misread history," March 11). Say what? Do the editors even read the stuff your op-ed writers send in before you publish it? Because I can't think of one other person who has ever argued that Prohibition was a success. And I'm not talking about starry eyed liberals.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
The article, "Firefighter recruits at issue at BWI Airport" (March 5), brought to light the issue of a recent all-white firefighter recruitment class at the Baltimore-Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport. A comment was made that "The complaints are the latest in a series of claims from black firefighters that they don't get equal consideration in recruitment at fire departments throughout the region. " If the nine white recruits were the most experienced and qualified for the job, as the article implies, then the people making the comment don't want equal considerations in recruitment for minority recruits, they want quotas.
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