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By Rob Kasper | February 12, 1997
CONTINUING a year-old tradition of giving questionable advice about what to feed your lover on Valentine's Day, I suggest the artichoke. That prickly green thing that looks like it is a cousin of the cactus.Every time I cook artichokes at our house, the windows steam up. That is mainly because the best way to cook these spiky plants is to steam them in a pot of lemon juice and water, a process that fills the kitchen with a pleasant aroma and lots of water vapor.The suggestion that artichokes are sexy will probably elicit two reactions from readers, one being derisive laughter, the other being faint interest.
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By ROB KASPER | July 15, 2009
J. Kelly Lane, a Baltimore artist, got a jolt of inspiration recently while walking down the produce aisle of the grocery store. Lane, a painter, was having trouble conjuring up an idea for her next piece. "I was coming up empty," she said." Then I was in the grocery store, Shopper's, and they put out these most beautiful artichokes. And I said, 'That's it!' " Lane told me. She bought an artichoke, took it home and worked its image into a painting called Flag of Artichokia. The work, she said, "has stars, stripes and artichokes."
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
Q: People rave about fresh artichokes, but mine always seem to be bitter and woody when cooked. How do I know a good artichoke and what's the best way to cook one?A: To choose the freshest and most tender artichokes, look for bright green leaves that are closed tightly together, not spreading.Avoid any artichokes that feel soft or have browning around the leaves.A relatively fast and tenderizing cooking treatment is steaming. Trim the stem and pointed spike tips with kitchen shears and remove any tough outer leaves.
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By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 3, 2006
Baby artichokes aren't immature globe artichokes; they're just smaller artichokes that grow nearer the ground instead of at the very top of the plant. They range from walnut- to egg-sized. They lack the thistlelike "choke" nestled in the tender heart near the base. Otherwise, they are just the same as larger artichokes. Baby artichokes are wholly edible once trimmed and cooked, and don't need as much trimming as their larger counterparts. Some people like to cut medium and large baby artichokes into halves or quarters.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | July 22, 1998
A spinach dip like that served at Houston's restaurants in Georgetown and Rockville was the request of Debra Barnes of Glen Burnie. "We have found and tried similar spinach dips but they just don't taste the same," she wrote.Tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe from Elaine Gershberg of Reisterstown."Hope this helps," Gershberg wrote. "I got it from the Internet. This is a knockoff of a popular appetizer served at Houston's, which has branches in Dallas and Chicago. Because Houston's does not give out recipes, this one for the creamy, rich dip made with spinach, artichokes and Romano cheese was developed in the Chicago Tribune kitchens.
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By Spike Gjerde and Spike Gjerde,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2002
This is the first in a monthly series. One of the lowlights of my restaurant career was my brief infatuation several years ago with the cardoon. For reasons lost to me now but probably derived from the exotic ring of its name, I began pestering our produce vendor for this distinctly non-native vegetable, and even added it to the menu of a wine dinner before I was assured of a supply. As the dinner approached, I became more and more insistent, until finally a weather-beaten box appeared at our kitchen door containing what looked to be giant, bleached stalks of celery.
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By Camille Kraeplin and Camille Kraeplin,The Dallas Morning News | July 10, 1991
Long ago, goes the story, mothers used an "artichoke advisory test" to assess their daughters' suitors.The test: The young man was invited to dinner, served an artichoke and, "if he knew how to eat it, the mother knew he was well-bred," says Patty Boman of the California Artichoke Advisory Board.Times have changed. Amorous young men no longer are called suitors. And most people know how to eat artichokes; it's the cooking that gives them pause, Ms. Boman says.Forget the fact that few people have the time to leisurely enjoy a food that's eaten leaf by leaf.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 29, 1995
The cool, misty mornings of late winter and early summer give birth to the maturing artichoke. As a chef, I anxiously await the arrival of artichokes at their peak.An artichoke is the immature flower of a large bush, a member of the thistle family. The heart of the artichoke is the flower base or receptacle, with the leaves being protective bracts of the flower center, better known as the choke.Baby artichokes are almost entirely edible, but as they grow and get larger, the medium and large artichokes develop firmer outer leaves that are quite difficult to eat. The larger artichokes are cooked, then trimmed of these coarse outer leaves and papery choke center, leaving the delicate base or heart and tender inner leaves.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 20, 1999
Everyone wants to prepare delicious food today -- but in simple dishes that can be made with a few ingredients.Evidence of this trend surfaced several years ago when cookbooks that highlighted recipes with modest ingredient lists started to appear. One such book that caught my eye was Rozanne Gold's "Recipes 1-2-3" (Viking, 1996), a collection of dishes with only three ingredients. I was so fascinated by this concept that I began walking down grocery aisles challenging myself to devise inventions with a trio of ingredients.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2003
Without fail at the end of each of my cooking classes, students raise their hands to ask about dishes that can be made in advance. Everyone, from restaurateurs to caterers to home cooks, loves food that can be completely prepared ahead with no last-minute kitchen angst. I certainly am among the legions who appreciate such recipes, especially when entertaining. And, of all the seasons of the year, summer lends itself best to make-ahead creations. Artichokes with a potato, bacon and chive filling, a recent addition to my repertoire, definitely fall into this category.
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 15, 2004
A seasonal vegetable can often serve as inspiration for a recipe. Young spring asparagus, summer heirloom tomatoes and fall's copper-hued sweet potatoes have all been sources of creativity in my kitchen. During the winter months, though, I see less to spark my imagination. But the other day, while looking at winter produce at a local supermarket, I spotted a display of Jerusalem artichokes, or, as they are sometimes labeled, sunchokes. It had been several years since I bought any of the brown knobby tubers, which are not truly artichokes but, rather, members of the sunchoke family.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Felicity Pocock of Baltimore requested a recipe for an "oyster-artichoke soup, or stew, ... which was a standard at a restaurant in New Orleans." Michael Cheswick of Eldersburg responded. "From the Gumbo Shop in New Orleans, oyster-and-artichoke soup for Felicity in Baltimore. The Gumbo Shop on South Front Street is one of the best-kept secrets in New Orleans. During a week's stay, I must have eaten there three or four times. I have served the soup during Super Bowls and at Christmas. ... You can get the Gumbo Shop cookbook online.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2003
Without fail at the end of each of my cooking classes, students raise their hands to ask about dishes that can be made in advance. Everyone, from restaurateurs to caterers to home cooks, loves food that can be completely prepared ahead with no last-minute kitchen angst. I certainly am among the legions who appreciate such recipes, especially when entertaining. And, of all the seasons of the year, summer lends itself best to make-ahead creations. Artichokes with a potato, bacon and chive filling, a recent addition to my repertoire, definitely fall into this category.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2002
LEES FERRY, Ariz. -- If food tastes better outdoors, imagine what it's like with the roaring Colorado River in your ears and the walls of the Grand Canyon looming above. Each year, more than 20,000 people ride rafts, kayaks or dories 277 miles down the mighty river. But unlike explorer John Wesley Powell, who navigated the Colorado in 1869, modern-day adventurers don't have to rough it. Breakfast will be eggs to order or French toast with a side order of melon and plenty of strong cowboy coffee.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
Carol C. Meyers of Towson says she is a cookbook collector but cannot find a recipe for a dish that she had recently at Timothy's Restaurant and Bar on the riverfront in Wilmington, Del. "It was too dark to read the menu, but a few choice complaints got the lights turned on. My son and I ordered the soup du jour and loved it. It was cream-based, with artichokes. Sounds awful, but it was delicious. My children are all big cooks and it would be a coup if I could find them a new recipe." Claire L. Mann of St. Michaels says she enjoys responding to Recipe Finder requests and has sent in recipes on many occasions.
NEWS
June 2, 2002
YES, OK, hurray for President Bush. He decided last week to spend $235 million to buy back oil and gas leases and thereby protect the beaches of Florida's Panhandle and 765,000 acres of the Everglades. It's the right thing to do, and it's popular, as well. Here's what's hard to figure out, though. The White House has pushed and pushed to allow oil companies to begin drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, though so far without success because of opposition in the Senate.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 16, 2000
The hottest trend in restaurants is something called "upscale casual," a strange phrase when you think about it -- hard to define and harder to accomplish. It's an appeal to all those paradoxical feelings Americans have about eating out. We want a laid-back place where we don't have to dress up, a place where we can stop by after work and not spend big bucks. But we're also more sophisticated about food and more health-conscious than we used to be, so we want interesting, fresh food. Rothwells Grille is one of the places that, for the most part, manages this balancing act. The dining rooms are pleasantly unmemorable, with comfortable booths and soothing lighting.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | March 1, 2000
Artichoke dish: a simple pleasure March is a peak month for artichokes. And when it comes to preparing this plant from the thistle family, simple is often better. Consider Artichokes and Balsamic Vinegar (pictured): Prepare, cook and drain 2 large or 4 medium artichokes. Cut each artichoke in half. Remove and discard choke. To serve, arrange each half on a serving plate, cut side up. Spoon 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar into center of each artichoke. Drizzle with extra-virgin olive oil and sprinkle with coarse salt, if desired.
NEWS
By Spike Gjerde and Spike Gjerde,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 17, 2002
This is the first in a monthly series. One of the lowlights of my restaurant career was my brief infatuation several years ago with the cardoon. For reasons lost to me now but probably derived from the exotic ring of its name, I began pestering our produce vendor for this distinctly non-native vegetable, and even added it to the menu of a wine dinner before I was assured of a supply. As the dinner approached, I became more and more insistent, until finally a weather-beaten box appeared at our kitchen door containing what looked to be giant, bleached stalks of celery.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 20, 2002
Last year I sampled a tempting Potato and Artichoke Gratin made by my good friend, June McCarthy. June is the chef to the governor of Ohio and spends much of her time creating interesting dishes, such as this one, to serve at the official residence. The gratin is composed of a layer of creamy mashed Yukon gold potatoes, which are covered with sauteed artichoke hearts and slivered kalamata olives. A topping of golden bread crumbs combined with grated Parmesan cheese and chopped parsley is added before the dish is baked.
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