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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 1999
I've got good news, bad news, good news and, then, even more good news.The first news is that the complete recorded legacy of Arthur Rubinstein (1887-1982), perhaps this century's most beloved pianist, will be reissued in October in its entirety as the "Rubinstein Collection." It's an unprecedented 94-CD compilation of all 706 recordings of 347 compositions made by the pianist between 1928 and 1976.The bad news is that this deluxe edition from BMG Classics, which contains many performances aficionados may already possess in various LP and CD incarnations, comes with a price tag of about $1,500.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
It looks a little bit like a body board, and it does ride the waves — sound waves, that is. Meet the harpejji, a fretted string instrument invented and built in the Baltimore area. Coldplay bought one. A.R. Rahman, who composed the score to "Slumdog Millionaire," purchased several of the instruments. A huge global audience saw Rahman play one during the Academy Awards ceremony last February, in a performance of the song "If I Rise" from his score to "127 Hours. " And Jordan Rudess, keyboardist of prog-metal group Dream Theater, plans to feature the harpejji (pronounced "har-PEH-jee")
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NEWS
July 11, 2003
On Tuesday, July 8, 2003, MINNIE RUBINSTEIN (nee Tabackman), beloved wife of the late Louis Rubinstein, devoted mother of Robert Rubinstein of Southbury, CT, Arthur Rubinstein of Baltimore, MD, Harold Rubinstein of Dallas, TX, Ted Rubinstein of Baltimore, MD and the late Bernard Savitch, devoted sister of the late Joseph Tabackman, Ella Corb and Nathan Tabackman. Also survived by six loving grandchildren and nine loving great-grandchildren. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Thursday, July 10 at 1 P.M. Interment Har Zion Tifereth Israel Congregation Cemetery, Rosedale.
NEWS
July 11, 2003
On Tuesday, July 8, 2003, MINNIE RUBINSTEIN (nee Tabackman), beloved wife of the late Louis Rubinstein, devoted mother of Robert Rubinstein of Southbury, CT, Arthur Rubinstein of Baltimore, MD, Harold Rubinstein of Dallas, TX, Ted Rubinstein of Baltimore, MD and the late Bernard Savitch, devoted sister of the late Joseph Tabackman, Ella Corb and Nathan Tabackman. Also survived by six loving grandchildren and nine loving great-grandchildren. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Thursday, July 10 at 1 P.M. Interment Har Zion Tifereth Israel Congregation Cemetery, Rosedale.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 19, 1991
Every great artist is said to be irreplaceable. But the death of pianist Rudolf Serkin earlier this month at the age of 88 is an irreplaceable loss in the most prosaic sense: There is literally no one to take his place as the reigning elder statesman of the piano. In fact -- in the United States at least -- there are no pianistic elder statesmen at all.In the last nine years three of the century's greatest pianists have died: Arthur Rubinstein (1982); Vladimir Horowitz (1989); and now Serkin.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 2, 1995
The two Brahms Sonatas occupy a place in the repertory for cello and piano superior even to the five of Beethoven. Their emotional and dramatic range was unprecedented and remains unequaled. The Brahms sonatas are to the cellist what Mozart's Don Giovanni and Wagner's Wotan are to the baritone -- opportunities to seize center stage from the tyrannical sway of the violin and the tenor.There has never been a shortage of recordings of these pieces: several new ones make a fine impression, and one that is newly reissued can be warmly welcomed back.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 8, 1992
The RCA logo of little Nipper listening with surprise to his master's voice on an acoustical horn omits an important detail from the original painting: Nipper is seated on master's coffin.That is, of course, the most important fact about records: Long after he or she is dead, records make it possible for the musician to keep playing. And such is the nature of musical celebrity that record companies scour their vaults and those of broadcast archives for performances by famous departed artists.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
It looks a little bit like a body board, and it does ride the waves — sound waves, that is. Meet the harpejji, a fretted string instrument invented and built in the Baltimore area. Coldplay bought one. A.R. Rahman, who composed the score to "Slumdog Millionaire," purchased several of the instruments. A huge global audience saw Rahman play one during the Academy Awards ceremony last February, in a performance of the song "If I Rise" from his score to "127 Hours. " And Jordan Rudess, keyboardist of prog-metal group Dream Theater, plans to feature the harpejji (pronounced "har-PEH-jee")
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 1991
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its music director, David Zinman, concluded what may have been its best Summerfest series ever Saturday with the best concert of the festival. The chief reason was an extraordinary Beethoven's "Emperor Concerto" that featured the pianist Nelson Freire.In the opinion of many piano aficionados -- including this writer -- Freire is the undisputed heir to the late Arthur Rubinstein. There is the same physical beauty of the playing -- gorgeous tone from top to bottom at all dynamic levels -- and a kind of technique that makes playing the piano seem as natural and as easy as breathing.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 5, 1990
Last night in Shriver Hall the Cantilena Piano Quartet played a sleepy program in a sleepy manner. The piano quartets of Aaron Copland and Gabriel Faure (No. 1 in C Minor) are fairly strong pieces, but combining them with the Vincent D'Indy piano quartet made for an evening that sometimes felt like swimming upstream in syrup. It was a snoozerama.The playing didn't help matters. The ensemble of the Cantilena players (pianist Frank Glazer, violinist Edna Michell, violist Philipp Naegele and cellist Steven Thomas)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 1999
I've got good news, bad news, good news and, then, even more good news.The first news is that the complete recorded legacy of Arthur Rubinstein (1887-1982), perhaps this century's most beloved pianist, will be reissued in October in its entirety as the "Rubinstein Collection." It's an unprecedented 94-CD compilation of all 706 recordings of 347 compositions made by the pianist between 1928 and 1976.The bad news is that this deluxe edition from BMG Classics, which contains many performances aficionados may already possess in various LP and CD incarnations, comes with a price tag of about $1,500.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 2, 1995
The two Brahms Sonatas occupy a place in the repertory for cello and piano superior even to the five of Beethoven. Their emotional and dramatic range was unprecedented and remains unequaled. The Brahms sonatas are to the cellist what Mozart's Don Giovanni and Wagner's Wotan are to the baritone -- opportunities to seize center stage from the tyrannical sway of the violin and the tenor.There has never been a shortage of recordings of these pieces: several new ones make a fine impression, and one that is newly reissued can be warmly welcomed back.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 8, 1992
The RCA logo of little Nipper listening with surprise to his master's voice on an acoustical horn omits an important detail from the original painting: Nipper is seated on master's coffin.That is, of course, the most important fact about records: Long after he or she is dead, records make it possible for the musician to keep playing. And such is the nature of musical celebrity that record companies scour their vaults and those of broadcast archives for performances by famous departed artists.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | May 19, 1991
Every great artist is said to be irreplaceable. But the death of pianist Rudolf Serkin earlier this month at the age of 88 is an irreplaceable loss in the most prosaic sense: There is literally no one to take his place as the reigning elder statesman of the piano. In fact -- in the United States at least -- there are no pianistic elder statesmen at all.In the last nine years three of the century's greatest pianists have died: Arthur Rubinstein (1982); Vladimir Horowitz (1989); and now Serkin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 14, 1995
That Jerzy Semkow is a much-underrated conductor was demonstrated last night in Meyerhoff Hall. The Polish-born conductor's reading of Brahms Symphony No. 4 in E Minor with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was the finest performance of the piece this listener has heard the BSO give in the nine years he's been regularly attending its concerts.It was a taut performance that captured the dark side of the work without eschewing warmth. The first movement was driven with a powerful sense of destination.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 13, 1995
In the second half of his recital yesterday afternoon at the Baltimore Museum of Art, pianist Mark Markham equaled a world record. His performance of Liszt's gargantuan, sprawling Sonata in B Minor took less than 26 minutes -- most take about a half-hour -- beat by a nose those of the young Vladimir Horowitz and Arthur Rubinstein and equaled that of the redoubtable Martha Argerich.Markham's performance was not a flashy stunt but a profoundly musical return to the grand manner in which the B Minor Sonata used to be played.
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