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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 21, 1999
Attention must be paid," Linda Loman says of her husband Willy in one of the most famous speeches in "Death of a Salesman." That line was first spoken on stage a half century ago, but thanks to a powerful new Broadway revival starring Brian Dennehy, attention is once again centering on Arthur Miller's modern classic.The reason isn't merely because of the strength of the production. It's because in this monumental drama, Miller introduced themes that would resonate not only with audiences 50 years later, but throughout much of his subsequent work.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Bay Theatre Company in Annapolis caps its 2012-2013 season with Arthur Miller's "The Price," a play that may be among the lesser-known of his works but nonetheless strikes a nerve with contemporary audiences. Miller's rarely staged, insightful play examines two estranged brothers meeting after 16 years to sell off the household contents of their dead parents, long stored in the attic of a Manhattan brownstone that is now scheduled for demolition. Bay Theatre dubs the work "Miller's last play of note" — it came two decades after his 1947 "All My Sons" and 1949 "Death of a Salesman" — yet its subject, family dynamics, is timeless.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 21, 2000
Arthur Miller's latest play, "The Ride Down Mt. Morgan," is a current Tony Award nominee, but area audiences can see the esteemed playwright's first Broadway success at Washington's Arena Stage. "All My Sons," Miller's 1947 drama about a family devastated by the double tragedy of a son missing in action and a serious lapse of business ethics, opens Friday. Broadway veterans M. Emmet Walsh and Beth Fowler star under Molly Smith's direction. Pavel Dobrusky, who designed the set and lighting, says that as the secrets of this seemingly average middle-American family begin to emerge, his set "will reveal the horror that lies beneath the serene facade."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
When actor Carl Schurr takes the stage tonight in Everyman Theatre 's production of "All My Sons," perhaps he will dedicate his performance to Cherry Watson. Cherry — and not even Schurr knows whether Cherry is a he or a she — was young Carl's imaginary friend in the 1940s. It was Cherry who helped the 4-year-old hang an invisible curtain in the archway leading to the living room of Schurr's home in Port Huron, Mich., creating a proscenium arch. It was Cherry who helped him put on plays for his parents and older sister.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 5, 1991
If Arthur Miller's "Clara" is indicative of what's to come, the General Motors Playwrights Theater could be the Masterpiece Theatre of American drama.The Playwrights Theater is a new series of one-act plays hosted by Lauren Bacall and presented by the Arts and Entertainment cable network. The series debuts at 9 tonight and will continue with one new play a month at least through May.What a wonderful launch Miller's "Clara" provides for such a series.The play is essentially a two-man performance: William Daniels plays police Lt. Fine (no first name given)
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Arthur Miller, widely regarded as America's foremost living playwright, died Thursday night at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 89. The cause was congestive heart failure, said Julia Bolus, his assistant. The legendary writer's 1949 Pulitzer Prize-winning work, Death of a Salesman - in which he used the relationship between a disillusioned salesman named Willy Loman and his sons to illuminate fallacies underlying the American dream - is among this country's best-known plays. In its most famous line, the salesman's wife exhorts: "Attention must be paid."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1992
Not many plays have a single word that sums up the message the actors wish to impart to the audience.One exception is Arthur Miller's drama "Playing for Time," to be performed by the South Carroll High School Stagelighters at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20 and 21 at the school in Winfield."
FEATURES
By Howard Kissel and Howard Kissel,New York Daily News | June 16, 1992
In January, Arthur Miller was honored by the National Arts Club. As a host of friends -- ranging from Robert Whitehead, who has produced many of his plays, to the novelist Louis Auchincloss -- paid him tribute, Mr. Miller sat with a bemused smile.At the end of the evening, Mr. Miller, a tall man unbowed by either his 76 years or a career with more than its share of vicissitudes, acknowledged their affectionate remarks and ended his own by comparing the current state of the theater with the condition of Italy in the Middle Ages.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 22, 1999
"None of us is alone. We're members of history," a character says in "Incident at Vichy.""We are symbols," another answers.That exchange typifies this rarely produced 1964 play by Arthur Miller. One of the playwright's most blatantly political works, it is receiving a competent production at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. But the cast's efforts cannot disguise the didacticism of the text.The plot focuses on nine men and a boy who are rounded up by the collaborationist government in Vichy, France, in 1942.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 1999
Moonlight Troupers brings us extraordinary theater in its production of Arthur Miller's powerful drama "All My Sons," now on the boards at Anne Arundel Community College.The troupe has put together skilled and professional staging and paid meticulous attention to detail that extends to the sets, lighting and the Glenn Miller music heard as the play begins.Director Barbara Marder deserves high praise for this artistic triumph. Robert Kauffman's set design, lighting and technical expertise contribute to the success of the production.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 18, 2007
Rita and Arthur Miller used to believe that honesty, hard work and filing taxes on time would keep you on society's good side. They believed this until about 2001, when, in the parallel universe known as the alternative minimum tax, the government began seeking more than $100,000 in tax on income that the couple never received. Six years later, the amount has doubled, and the couple will probably have to liquidate their retirement savings and maybe sell their townhouse to pay the bill.
TOPIC
February 13, 2005
The World Israel and the Palestinians announced that they would cease violence in a landmark summit that appeared to offer the most hope for peace in the Middle East since 1993, when then-Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat sealed the Oslo peace accord with a famous handshake on the White House lawn. The accord sputtered for years until the Palestinian uprising broke out in 2000. North Korea declared that it had "manufactured nuclear weapons" and called for bilateral negotiations with the United States.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
WORLD N. Korea demands U.S. talks A day after declaring that it possessed nuclear weapons, North Korea demanded one-on-one talks with the United States over its weapons program. Washington rejected the demand, saying talks must include North Korea's neighbors. [Page 1a] Rumsfeld visits Iraq Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld made a surprise visit to Mosul and Baghdad yesterday, meeting with U.S. and Iraqi troops. Meanwhile, a truck bomb blew up outside a mosque in Baghdad, killing at least 23 people.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
IT'S A GOOD BET that many if not most of the obituaries for Arthur Miller will work in one of the playwright's most well-known and anguished lines: "Attention must be paid." That's Linda Loman saying it, wife of Willy and mother of Biff and Happy, and she is bringing to it a mixture of distress and outrage over the hand her husband has been dealt. She had faith in him, even if he didn't - and what about everyone else? Death of a Salesman is about a discarded life, and it is a particularly American story.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Arthur Miller, widely regarded as America's foremost living playwright, died Thursday night at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 89. The cause was congestive heart failure, said Julia Bolus, his assistant. The legendary writer's 1949 Pulitzer Prize-winning work, Death of a Salesman - in which he used the relationship between a disillusioned salesman named Willy Loman and his sons to illuminate fallacies underlying the American dream - is among this country's best-known plays. In its most famous line, the salesman's wife exhorts: "Attention must be paid."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 11, 2004
I know Miller's people," says Howard Witt. The actor is referring to Arthur Miller. His knowledge of the playwright's characters comes from appearing in repeated productions of Miller's plays, most notably in the 1999 Broadway revival of Death of a Salesman. Witt's portrayal of Charley, the title character's neighbor, earned him a Tony Award nomination; he will re-create that performance on London's West End this spring. Witt is discussing Miller now because, beginning tonight in Center Stage's production of The Price, he will portray Gregory Solomon, an 89-year-old Russian-Jewish immigrant antiques dealer who attempts to put a value on the estate left to two estranged brothers.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 8, 1999
Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "Death of a Salesman," turns 50 on Wednesday. The occasion will be marked by the opening of a new Broadway revival, as well as the release of an anniversary edition of the script, published by Penguin Books, with a new preface by the playwright. Here are some "Salesman" facts and figures: Miller wrote the first act in one day and the second in six weeks.He subtitled the play: "Certain Private Conversations in Two Acts and a Requiem."The play opened at Broadway's Morosco Theatre on Feb. 10, 1949, and ran for 742 performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 11, 2004
I know Miller's people," says Howard Witt. The actor is referring to Arthur Miller. His knowledge of the playwright's characters comes from appearing in repeated productions of Miller's plays, most notably in the 1999 Broadway revival of Death of a Salesman. Witt's portrayal of Charley, the title character's neighbor, earned him a Tony Award nomination; he will re-create that performance on London's West End this spring. Witt is discussing Miller now because, beginning tonight in Center Stage's production of The Price, he will portray Gregory Solomon, an 89-year-old Russian-Jewish immigrant antiques dealer who attempts to put a value on the estate left to two estranged brothers.
NEWS
June 6, 2002
The Grapes of Wrath - the very name is enough to summon the taste of dust and despair. John Steinbeck, whose centennial is being observed this year, won the Pulitzer Prize for the novel, which perhaps is his most famous work. Celebrated as a novelist and a writer of short stories, he was also a journalist - one who kept watch with the novelist's eye, finding enduring truths in the day-to-day events around him. During World War II, he reported from Italy and North Africa for the New York Herald Tribune.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 21, 2000
Arthur Miller's latest play, "The Ride Down Mt. Morgan," is a current Tony Award nominee, but area audiences can see the esteemed playwright's first Broadway success at Washington's Arena Stage. "All My Sons," Miller's 1947 drama about a family devastated by the double tragedy of a son missing in action and a serious lapse of business ethics, opens Friday. Broadway veterans M. Emmet Walsh and Beth Fowler star under Molly Smith's direction. Pavel Dobrusky, who designed the set and lighting, says that as the secrets of this seemingly average middle-American family begin to emerge, his set "will reveal the horror that lies beneath the serene facade."
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