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NEWS
December 28, 2012
A shocking and dastardly literary crime has been perpetrated upon a heretofore unsuspecting citizenry. How could you allow The Sun to publish such a travesty about the fictional sleuth Sherlock Holmes ("On the case," Dec. 23)? Contrary to what the writer claims, Sherlock Holmes was not the first consulting detective in modern literature, and Arthur Conan Doyle did not invent the police procedural. In fact, a character named C. Auguste Dupin was on the case nearly five decades before Holmes made his first appearance.
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NEWS
December 28, 2012
A shocking and dastardly literary crime has been perpetrated upon a heretofore unsuspecting citizenry. How could you allow The Sun to publish such a travesty about the fictional sleuth Sherlock Holmes ("On the case," Dec. 23)? Contrary to what the writer claims, Sherlock Holmes was not the first consulting detective in modern literature, and Arthur Conan Doyle did not invent the police procedural. In fact, a character named C. Auguste Dupin was on the case nearly five decades before Holmes made his first appearance.
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FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune Newspapers | November 27, 2009
Say goodbye to the deerstalker hat, the twee houndstooth Inverness overcoat and the oversized magnifying glass. Sherlock Holmes in the 2009 big-budget rendition of Arthur Conan Doyle's famed detective is most certainly no sexless, stuffy Victorian gentleman. This Sherlock Holmes - as played by the turbo-speed Robert Downey Jr. - is a bare-knuckle brawler, a martial arts devotee with a mind that whizzes along like a Ferrari and a penchant for falling into a disheveled slough of depression between cases.
NEWS
January 5, 1997
Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He attended Jesuit schools and entered the University of Edinburgh, where he studied medicine. It was there he came across Dr. Joseph Bell, whom he later used as a model for his Sherlock Holmes character.He began writing only after attempts at a medical career failed. In 1888 he published his first book featuring Holmes, "A Study in Scarlet." By 1891 his character had a large following and though Doyle wanted to write more serious literature, saying that Holmes "takes my mind from better things," the author wrote two dozen stories about his most famous character.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
They gather together every other month for an evening of mystery and crime. These salespeople, lawyers, government workers, psychiatrists, bank employees and others seem an unlikely group to wallow in such debauchery.But their wallowing takes them back to earlier times. Much earlier. Those who gather are Sherlock Holmes aficionados, and darn proud of it, thank you. Now, one such group in Baltimore is celebrating 50 years of coming together to enjoy, dissect and discuss that "great Victorian detective" Sherlock Holmes and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 6, 2000
The Doctor and the Detective: A Biography of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle" by Martin Booth (St. Martin's Minotaur, 371 pages, $27.95) Though his immensely varied and phenomenally constructive life was often eclipsed by his virtually miraculous Sherlock Holmes story, Doyle was a sublime Victorian polymath. Martin Booth, author of 12 novels and, among other books, a history of opium, has produced a biography that gives fair, balanced and fascinating measure to the whole man. A delightful exploration even for readers indifferent to Holmes -- if such people exist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 7, 2002
Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Novels, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 496 pages, $12.95) and Sherlock Holmes: The Complete Illustrated Short Stories, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chancellor / Sterling Press, 991 pages, $12.95) I have known people -- even one or two who are not pathological anglophobes--who just don't get what A. Conan Doyle is all about. Pity. I am hopelessly an enthusiast. The short stories and one of the novels -- I think it was The Hound of the Baskervilles -- were read to me by my father before I could read them myself.
NEWS
March 1, 2004
In celebration of Sherlock Holmes' 150th birthday, members of Watson's Tin Box, a local scion society of the Baker Street Irregulars, will introduce visitors to Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. March 25 at the Miller branch library. "We are a Sherlockian society. We study and talk about and have fellowship with other people who like Sherlock Holmes stories," said society member Ralph Adams, who lives in Ellicott City and volunteers at the library. The group does not do detective work in the style of Holmes.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment on his blog, You Don't say, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: EXIGUOUS Something that is small in size or amount, or meager, is exiguous (ex-IG-you-us). The word comes from the Latin exiguus, "scanty," and in turn from the verb exigere, "to measure out" or "to weigh exactly.
NEWS
January 5, 1997
Arthur Conan Doyle was born in 1859 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He attended Jesuit schools and entered the University of Edinburgh, where he studied medicine. It was there he came across Dr. Joseph Bell, whom he later used as a model for his Sherlock Holmes character.He began writing only after attempts at a medical career failed. In 1888 he published his first book featuring Holmes, "A Study in Scarlet." By 1891 his character had a large following and though Doyle wanted to write more serious literature, saying that Holmes "takes my mind from better things," the author wrote two dozen stories about his most famous character.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
They gather together every other month for an evening of mystery and crime. These salespeople, lawyers, government workers, psychiatrists, bank employees and others seem an unlikely group to wallow in such debauchery.But their wallowing takes them back to earlier times. Much earlier. Those who gather are Sherlock Holmes aficionados, and darn proud of it, thank you. Now, one such group in Baltimore is celebrating 50 years of coming together to enjoy, dissect and discuss that "great Victorian detective" Sherlock Holmes and his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
NEWS
November 18, 2007
A gift: The Enoch Pratt Free Library announced last week that it is giving every Baltimore public school teacher, about 6,000 educators, a copy of the children's book The Three Questions. This beloved tale is one of the favorite books of Andres Alonso, new chief executive officer of Baltimore City public schools. "We would like to welcome Dr. Alonso to Baltimore by presenting this gift to our dedicated educators across the city," said Carla D. Hayden, executive director of the library. New on the shelf "A Slave No More" by David W. Blight -- Harcourt Slave narratives, some of the most powerful records of our past, are extremely rare, with only 55 post-Civil War narratives surviving.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Slipping Into Darkness Peter Blauner The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes: The Novels Arthur Conan Doyle, edited by Leslie S. Klinger W.W. Norton & Co. / 992 pages / $49.95 This book would have scored major points on appearance alone, with a handsome cover and well-designed slipcase. But it only takes a single glance inside the pages to behold Klinger's scholarship and breadth of knowledge of all things Holmesian (also in evidence in 2004's two-volume set of the complete short stories)
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