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By Bill Dwyre and Bill Dwyre,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2006
NEW YORK -- For 21 years at the U.S. Open, he had left them cheering. Yesterday, Andre Agassi left them crying. Standing and crying, no less. The inevitable had happened. At age 36, he was playing in his last pro tennis tournament. He had won here twice during a career that made him rich, famous and, in the latter years, a sort of legendary ambassador of good sport and good will. He came here with a disc injury in his back that would have most grown men crying for their mommies. Despite that, he had won first- and second-round thrillers, both long and physically taxing matches.
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By Diane Pucin, Tribune newspapers | September 11, 2010
NEW YORK — It wasn't the final point of the match, the winning forehand from Kim Clijsters that couldn't be chased down by a dispirited and slow-footed Venus Williams, that brought 23,000 people to their feet at Arthur Ashe Stadium on Friday. That was just about expected because second-seeded and defending champion Clijsters had gained such momentum from another shot, a luxurious lob that sailed just beyond the racket of Williams and skipped off the baseline as Williams waved her racket helplessly.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
NEW YORK - No. 1 seed Kim Clijsters walked the Arthur Ashe Stadium court, spreading her hands skyward, testing the moisture in the air. She wanted to play - oh, how both she and No. 5 Amelie Mauresmo wanted to play. It was the same way last night for No. 4 Andy Roddick and Xavier Malisse, and for No. 8 Rainer Schuettler and No. 12 Sjeng Schalken. But the mist - that moist, almost invisible moisture that creeps in under umbrellas to dampen faces and onto the white lines at the National Tennis Center, making them too slippery for U.S. Open play - had its way again.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra has been coping with firsts all week and handling them: She won a wildcard entry into the U.S. Open to claim her first main-draw spot in a Grand Slam tournament and then breezed through her first two matches beating two women ranked inside the Top 100, including one inside the Top 20. But Saturday afternoon in the Open's third round a handful of firsts were just too many for the 18-year-old. Playing on Arthur Ashe Stadium's Center Court for the first time against No. 14 seed and past Open champion Maria Sharapova in winds of approximately 25 mph, Capra went down, 6-0, 6-0. It was Sharapova's first career shutout at a Grand Slam and it was the first double-0 score in the third round of the Open since 1984 when Martina Navratilova beat Jennifer Mundel, 6-0, 6-0. Still, Capra was smiling when she entered the post-match interview room.
NEWS
By Diane Pucin, Tribune newspapers | September 11, 2010
NEW YORK — It wasn't the final point of the match, the winning forehand from Kim Clijsters that couldn't be chased down by a dispirited and slow-footed Venus Williams, that brought 23,000 people to their feet at Arthur Ashe Stadium on Friday. That was just about expected because second-seeded and defending champion Clijsters had gained such momentum from another shot, a luxurious lob that sailed just beyond the racket of Williams and skipped off the baseline as Williams waved her racket helplessly.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- Venus Williams dances off the Arthur Ashe Stadium court after her passage into the U.S. Open quarterfinals. Her hair clattering, as the 1,800 red, white and blue beads braided into it knock against each other.Welcome to the world of Venus, where life on and off the court seems to be a game in which only Williams knows the rules."I'm completely different from anyone else," says Williams, 17. "I can't help it. I just am. Tiger Woods is something different in golf and I also am different.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2010
Ellicott City's Beatrice Capra has been coping with firsts all week and handling them: She won a wildcard entry into the U.S. Open to claim her first main-draw spot in a Grand Slam tournament and then breezed through her first two matches beating two women ranked inside the Top 100, including one inside the Top 20. But Saturday afternoon in the Open's third round a handful of firsts were just too many for the 18-year-old. Playing on Arthur Ashe Stadium's Center Court for the first time against No. 14 seed and past Open champion Maria Sharapova in winds of approximately 25 mph, Capra went down, 6-0, 6-0. It was Sharapova's first career shutout at a Grand Slam and it was the first double-0 score in the third round of the Open since 1984 when Martina Navratilova beat Jennifer Mundel, 6-0, 6-0. Still, Capra was smiling when she entered the post-match interview room.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | September 4, 1998
NEW YORK -- Mary Pierce is sitting with friends in the players lounge at the U.S. Open when she's interrupted. She and Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar have been an item for about a year, and rumors have been swirling.Are you and Alomar engaged, she's asked?"Don't you know?" said Pierce, who was in good spirits after advancing to the third round with a 6-1, 6-1 victory over Cara Black. "Don't you know? We're already married with two children."And then she laughed happily as she flashed her left hand, on which she is wearing a ring with seven diamonds.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2012
Football and tennis don't share much in common except perhaps that Raven tackle Bryant McKinnie is crazy about both. So much so that it got McKinnie into the famously gossipy Page Six section of the New York Post. The Post found the big man at Arthur Ashe Stadium on Saturday -- just as he headed into a contract dispute with the team that pays his bills. He was there to watch his good friend Serena Williams in the US Open quarterfinals. "According to a spy, McKinnie, an 11-year NFL vet, 'loves to pick up a racket on his off days . . . often with Serena and Venus Williams.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 9, 2009
NEW YORK - -Third-seeded Rafael Nadal withstood a first-set barrage by Gael Monfils and advanced to the U.S. Open quarterfinals Tuesday night at Arthur Ashe Stadium with a 6-7 (3), 6-3, 6-1, 6-3 win. Nadal's comeback saved him from experiencing the same result as second-seeded Andy Murray, who exited with a lifeless performance in a 7-5, 6-2, 6-2 loss to 16th-seeded Marin Cilic of Croatia. Murray, who was a finalist here last year, called it the "worst match of his life." And with those results, Nadal moves ahead of Murray and back to the No. 2 spot in the ATP computer rankings.
SPORTS
By Bill Dwyre and Bill Dwyre,Los Angeles Times | September 4, 2006
NEW YORK -- For 21 years at the U.S. Open, he had left them cheering. Yesterday, Andre Agassi left them crying. Standing and crying, no less. The inevitable had happened. At age 36, he was playing in his last pro tennis tournament. He had won here twice during a career that made him rich, famous and, in the latter years, a sort of legendary ambassador of good sport and good will. He came here with a disc injury in his back that would have most grown men crying for their mommies. Despite that, he had won first- and second-round thrillers, both long and physically taxing matches.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
NEW YORK - No. 1 seed Kim Clijsters walked the Arthur Ashe Stadium court, spreading her hands skyward, testing the moisture in the air. She wanted to play - oh, how both she and No. 5 Amelie Mauresmo wanted to play. It was the same way last night for No. 4 Andy Roddick and Xavier Malisse, and for No. 8 Rainer Schuettler and No. 12 Sjeng Schalken. But the mist - that moist, almost invisible moisture that creeps in under umbrellas to dampen faces and onto the white lines at the National Tennis Center, making them too slippery for U.S. Open play - had its way again.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1997
NEW YORK -- Venus Williams dances off the Arthur Ashe Stadium court after her passage into the U.S. Open quarterfinals. Her hair clattering, as the 1,800 red, white and blue beads braided into it knock against each other.Welcome to the world of Venus, where life on and off the court seems to be a game in which only Williams knows the rules."I'm completely different from anyone else," says Williams, 17. "I can't help it. I just am. Tiger Woods is something different in golf and I also am different.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 11, 2009
NEW YORK -- For one set Thursday, Marin Cilic frolicked on the Arthur Ashe Stadium court. He hit crazy, curving backhands and had sixth-seeded Juan Martin del Potro muttering under his breath. But there was a second set. It was then that del Potro found his game on a gloomy afternoon where the wind played tricks with the ball. Del Potro did too, moving Cilic from side to side. By the end, Cilic was left slapping aimless volleys into the net and making useless challenges to balls well wide.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2003
NEW YORK - No. 2 seed Roger Federer, in a midnight blue sweat shirt and gray sweat pants, looked like Prince Valiant of the old comic strip yesterday, as he strolled around Arthur Ashe Stadium in the rain. His brown, chin-length hair was loose, a change from the tied-back look he has during matches. And he was smiling, obviously having a good time as he batted tennis balls to fans who had stayed in their seats during a rain delay that stretched from early afternoon to evening. Federer could afford to be playful because he had won his third-round match late Sunday night before the rain came.
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