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By Lawrence K. Altman and Lawrence K. Altman,New York Times News Service | November 20, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A major new study of a cholesterol-lowering drug has found that it can shrink the fatty deposits in coronary arteries that are linked to heart attacks.The findings, in a study of the drug lovastatin, hold the promise that significant progress can ultimately be made in reducing the toll from heart disease, the leading killer in the United States and most developed countries.The results of the study add to the evidence that a low-fat diet and drugs can halt and reverse the buildup of fatty deposits, or plaque, in arteries in a process known as atherosclerosis, but it is the first suggestion that a single drug could have that effect.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Work will begin Thursday on a long-planned project to expand a portion of Route 29 in Howard County that is considered a "major commuter bottleneck" near Columbia's town center, officials said. The $32.7 million project will see three miles of northbound Route 29 widened from two to three lanes from just north of Route 32 to just south of Route 175. The work will also remove direct access points from residential streets onto Route 29 in the area, furthering the transition of the road into a controlled-access highway.
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NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 5, 2003
A small clinical trial has shown for the first time that it is possible to use drugs to remove plaque from clogged arteries, a finding that could lead to radically new ways to treat heart disease, the No. 1 killer in the United States. Infusions of a genetically engineered mutant form of high-density lipoprotein, the so-called good cholesterol, over a five-week period were shown to reduce plaque volume in patients suffering from chest pain. "This is an extraordinary and unprecedented finding," said Dr. Steven E. Nissen of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, who led the study reported in today's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, Kevin Rector and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
A nearly 120-year-old retaining wall that has troubled Charles Village residents for decades collapsed Wednesday amid a month's worth of rain, dumping street lights, sidewalks and half a dozen cars onto the CSX rail tracks below. No injuries were reported. City officials evacuated 19 adjacent homes along East 26th Street and urged residents to avoid the area in case of lingering instability. The landslide halted CSX rail traffic through what is a main artery to the port of Baltimore.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2003
Rob Alford, veteran heart patient, became a pioneer last week when tiny tubes were threaded into his clogged arteries. Doctors believe the devices could transform cardiac medicine. On Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug-coated stent that keeps scar tissue from choking newly unclogged arteries. The next day, Alford, a 50-year-old Bel Air resident, became one of the first patients in the country outside a clinical trial to get the new treatment. "This is the hottest thing in cardiology in years," said Dr. Mark Midei, the St. Joseph Medical Center physician who treated Alford.
SPORTS
January 5, 1991
Denver head coach Dan Reeves got a clean bill of health after a follow-up examination of his heart condition. A coronary angiogram -- involving inserting a tube into Reeves' heart, putting dye through it, and checking for blockage in the arteries around the heart -- was performed Thursday.In August, Reeves had chest pains and was diagnosed with blockage of the arteries. The next day he was flown to a hospital in Redwood City, Calif., where a procedure was performed to open up the arteries.
NEWS
November 17, 2008
Heavy children have arteries of a 45-year-old obesity The arteries of many obese children and teenagers are as thick and stiff as those of 45-year-olds, a sign that such children could have severe cardiovascular disease at a much younger age than their parents unless their condition is reversed, researchers said Tuesday. "It's possible that they will have heart disease in their 20s and 30s," said Dr. Geetha Raghuveer of the University of Missouri at Kansas City, who led the study presented at a New Orleans meeting of the American Heart Association.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 24, 2006
Wire mesh tubes called stents are widely used to prop open previously blocked coronary arteries - and they're often coated with drugs, which are thought to help keep the arteries open even more effectively. Recent studies, however, have shown that, in many cases, the arteries narrow again despite the drugs. Some physicians also suspect that drug-eluting stents are more dangerous than uncoated stents and that stents in general may irritate vessel walls. A small study presented at a national cardiologists' meeting and reported online on the New England Journal of Medicine Web site suggests an alternative for keeping the vessels from closing - coating the balloon used for angiography with a drug that inhibits plaque formation.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2003
We know that ozone pollutes the air, seeps into the lungs and prompts health alerts that keep people indoors. Now add this to your ozone worry list - your body creates ozone, and it may cause heart disease. California researchers say the same ozone formed by the body's immune system to fight off infections in the bloodstream - a function discovered a year ago - may contribute to atherosclerois, a major killer. Although breathing ozone may hurt your respiratory system, it isn't damaging your arteries, according to researchers from the Scripps Research Institute in LaJolla.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 25, 1994
The first physical explanation of why blacks are prone to high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and strokes has been announced by researchers who say the findings may open the door to the development of new treatments.University of Georgia scientists found that arteries from black patients with severe heart disease were unable to return quickly to normal size after they had constricted in response to stress or medications. This relaxation is impaired, they found, because cells lining the arteries do not produce chemicals that stimulate enlargement.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
From its humble origins on the shores of the Patapsco River in industrial and rail-clogged South Baltimore, Charles Street transforms itself during its 10.9-mile journey through the heart of the city as it heads north through the fashionable and wealthy neighborhoods of Guilford, Homeland, Woodbrook, Murray Hill and into Baltimore County. Charles Street β€” less glamorously known as state Route 139 above North Avenue β€” courses its way through Mount Vernon Place, around the Washington Monument, the first erected to the nation's first president.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. - Just before Wednesday's workout began at the Ed Smith Stadium Complex, Orioles manager Buck Showalter called for 10-year-old Johnny Oates II and his younger brother Jackson to hop the fence and join the team on the field. The siblings quickly sprinted to Showalter, who introduced them to the players circling around, most of them starters. That's when Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts spoke up. β€œLet's show them what we have in common,” Roberts said with a smile before both he and Johnny lifted their shirts to reveal large vertical scars along the middle of their chests.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Owls can rotate their heads a dizzying 270 degrees, allowing them to see what's happening behind them while perched on a tree branch or barn beam. This evolutionary adaptation helps the birds keep their fixed-socket, binocular eyes trained on the scurrying mice and other small prey they hunt. But how exactly do their necks seemingly defy the limitations of bones and blood vessels as they swivel around like a submarine periscope? Fabian de Kok-Mercado, a Johns Hopkins-trained medical illustrator and an owl enthusiast, was curious.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton recently received a gag gift of protective headgear after she suffered a concussion and blood clot near her brain after a fall. While Clinton can now make light of the injuries, a blood clot can be a serious health risk that can lead to death. Dr. James L. Frazier, III, a neurosurgeon at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, talks about the dangers. What causes a blood clot to form in the brain? A blood clot or thrombus can form in the arteries that supply blood to the brain.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
HEALTH
By Robert Little and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 15, 2010
St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, whose cardiology business is a focus of a continuing federal health-care fraud investigation, has notified hundreds of its heart patients that they may have received expensive and potentially dangerous coronary implants they didn't need. An internal review, begun last May at the behest of federal investigators and in response to a patient complaint, has turned up 369 patients with stents that appear to have been implanted in their arteries unnecessarily, CEO Jeffrey K. Norman said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 25, 2007
After more than a decade-long decline, is heart bypass surgery poised for a comeback? Some doctors say it may be time to give bypass operations a second look, including some cardiologists who specialize in the far more popular alternative - using stents to keep coronary arteries propped open. No one is predicting a sudden surge back to bypass, which is still a far more invasive and initially riskier way to treat plaque-clogged heart arteries, a condition that afflicts millions of Americans.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2001
Vice President Dick Cheney's recent problem with a clogged "stent" didn't surprise doctors who use the devices to reopen arteries of the heart. Many said they wouldn't be surprised if the stent clogs again, sending him back to the hospital for further treatment. But if that happens, it is likely that doctors will treat Cheney's problem with radioactive pellets, a new therapy for the heart borrowed from the world of oncology. The pellets have been used for many years to shrink tumors of the prostate and brain.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | michael.dresser@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Casey Kim points to the spot where the body of a woman hit by a car on U.S. 40 landed by the mailbox just in front of his Rosedale store in August 2006. Kim, owner of On Lok Liquors, said the victim, 38-year-old Melissa Dawn Sullivan of Baltimore, was one of four people killed in separate pedestrian crashes just outside his door since he took over the business six years ago. For more than five years , it has been the most dangerous spot on one of Maryland's most hazardous highways for people on foot.
NEWS
November 17, 2008
Heavy children have arteries of a 45-year-old obesity The arteries of many obese children and teenagers are as thick and stiff as those of 45-year-olds, a sign that such children could have severe cardiovascular disease at a much younger age than their parents unless their condition is reversed, researchers said Tuesday. "It's possible that they will have heart disease in their 20s and 30s," said Dr. Geetha Raghuveer of the University of Missouri at Kansas City, who led the study presented at a New Orleans meeting of the American Heart Association.
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